Alberta, Canada: The Final

30 June – 22 July, 2016 – In the meantime we had booked our flights back to Europe. Somehow ┬áthis trip didn’t feel as it should anymore, we didn’t get excited about anything anymore and we felt more and more exhausted. Until lately we had been so lucky with everything – meeting the right people, the weather was mostly as we liked it, we cycled through exciting and diverse landscapes. But the last months were different. We didn’t enjoy anything anymore: not our freedom and not our surroundings. We were tired of travelling and pitching the tent every day somewhere else in the rain and the cold. The few people we met weren’t really what we had expected and hoped for. On top we both became quite depressive – usually we were able to motivate each other as one usually was better off, but that was different this time. And as we were not on a race nor had to prove ourselves that we are the tough guys we booked flights back to Europe.

Leaving Edson campground
Leaving Edson campground

dscf3181

But until then we still had a few weeks to enjoy cycling – as that was something we really enjoyed: being outside and pedalling. We were now headed towards Jasper and Banff National Park. Not realising that it was Canada weekend and usually everyone takes this long weekend off we were pedalling with thousands of motorised tourists into the park. The views were beautiful but the traffic horrendous. We also didn’t realise that it was quite expensive to enter the park and that we had to pay the same fees as the cars as you are paying by head and not vehicle. Even worse we were told that all campsites are full and that there is no way we could get a camp spot anywhere.

dscf3198

We're not the only ones :-(
We’re not the only ones ­čśŽ

dscf3215

With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park
With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park

While we were discussing what to do one of the park rangers approached us and offered us to camp next to their cabin besides a campsite. We happily accepted and cycled to said campsite only to hear that a black bear has been regularly visiting the site lately and that we needed to be very careful. Nonetheless we pitched our tent next to the rangers’ cabin and felt so lucky as we could warm up ourselves inside and even used their kitchen and bathroom while it rained cats and dogs outside.

dscf3229

Unfortunately people still get out of their vehicles when they see animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies
Unfortunately people still got out of their vehicles when spotting animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies

It rained all night but our tent luckily stayed dry inside. By 10am the sun had managed to push back the clouds and we moved on. Next stop was Jasper where we wanted to stay a few days to make some day trips into the wilderness. The landscape within the park was absolutely beautiful and we tried to not get upset about all these many cars passing by. Suddenly we saw a few huge moose walking through a lake towards us. A beautiful sight and we were the first ones to stop. After a few minutes and by the time the animals were right beside us about 50 cars had stopped next to the road and more than hundred people took selfies with these animals as if they were some tamed pets.

Yes, there is still some traffic
Yes, there is still some traffic

p1260522

dscf3436

Yes, still some traffic

dscf3407
Huge cargo train in the background

dscf3278 dscf3308 dscf3311

In Jasper we were lucky that the campsite always reserved a few spots for cyclists and hikers as we didn’t want to wild camp. There we met Greg, a Canadian teacher at a First Nation School, with whom we would spend more time over the coming days. We also met Willi, Anne and Arthur – a wonderful German family who invited us twice for dinner just because they admired what we were doing. They also took us in their car to beautiful Maligne lake where we hiked for a few hours.

p1260562

dscf3484

Maligne Lake...
On the way to Maligne Lake

p1260563

The Germans in their canoes
Canoeing is a big business at Maligne Lake
Rain drops falling
Rain drops falling
With Anne, Willi and Arthur
With Anne, Willi and Arthur

From now on there was exactly one road through the National Park. Traffic lessened a bit the further we went into the park and cycling was extremely rewarding: the landscapes would change constantly, we saw quite some wildlife including bears and usually managed to arrive at one of the beautiful wilderness campsites on time. These campsites are very basic, all you get is outhouses, firewood and if you are very lucky drinking water.  There are usually tables and benches at every pitch which saved us from cooking and eating on the ground. Often you hardly see any other campers as the campgrounds are big and spread out in a forest.

dscf3728 dscf3742 p1260612 p1260606

dscf3849 dscf3864 dscf3977 dscf4053 dscf4061 dscf4091 p1260632 p1260634

dscf4121 dscf4131 dscf4197

dscf4250 dscf4279 dscf4365 dscf4402 dscf4416 dscf4487 dscf4506 dscf4529 dscf4589

At Lake Louise we met Greg again. We had arrived in the late afternoon and were lucky enough to get the last camp spot at a local campground (we desperately needed showers after a few days cycling without any facilities). Too tired to cook ourselves we treated ourselves to a dinner out where Greg already pleasurably munched on his huge hamburger. He had just arrived and wanted to stay at the hostel – but that was full so he was forced to camp out once more. As we knew that the only campground was full we offered him to pitch his tent next to ours. And so we stayed together for a few more days at Lake Louise where he hiked and we cycled to Lake Moraine and Lake Louise. Due to too many cars the police had closed the 15km-long road to Lake Moraine and we happily cycled up the mountain and to a beautiful and relatively quiet site. Since I’ve met Johan he had told me he wanted to go skiing with me in Canada and show me Lake Louise. This seemed for him a very nice and romantic place many years ago. He had been there with his grandmother at the age of 12 – more than 40 years ago. However, things have changed in the meantime and thousands of tourists made this once for him so special place a disappointing one and we cycled back quickly after we had managed to take a few photos.

Time for a good drip coffee
Time for a good drip coffee…
...with some porridge.
…with some porridge.
Peaceful Lake Moraine
Peaceful Lake Moraine
...and busy Lake Louise
…and busy Lake Louise

By the time we arrived in Banff we had passed a few more summits, saw absolutely beautiful crystal-clear lakes from high above and had even enjoyed a few sunny summer days. The day we arrived in Banff it would just pour again, for days in a row. Thankfully the campground managers gave us a tarp so we were able to cook. But we did not go on hikes or did any other tours and after two days we moved on quickly towards Calgary.

dscf4827 dscf4839 dscf4858

dscf4882 dscf4888 dscf4902

Final picture in the National Park
Final picture in the National Park

Johan’s uncle Reinier emigrated to Canada in the early ’50s and this was our chance to visit his family abroad. Reinier is married with three sons and as we had about a week left we could meet most of Johan’s family. From Anchorage we had sent a huge package with our spare parts, some new clothes and presents from people we met on the road to get rid of some of the heavy stuff we didn’t need. While enjoying dinner with Reinier and his wife Ann we were looking forward to our treasures only to hear, that they had given everything to the “Bibles with a Mission” thrift shop. When the package had arrived a few months ago they didn’t remember anymore what to do with it and where it came from, so they thought they better bring it to the bible shop where they used to work once per week. Shocked with disbelieve we needed a few days to get over it. In the end all got settled in a good way and we left without any hard feelings. We had been treated very well in Calgary – Johan even got his favourite Dutch dish cooked – and were sad to leave them behind, not knowing if and when we would see them again.

dscf4935 dscf4950

p1260789

With Johan's family
With Johan’s family

p1260803 p1260806

From a big mess...
From a big mess…
...to four well-organised packages.
…to four well-organised packages.
Final photo before takeoff
Final photo before takeoff

Alberta, Kanada: Das Finale

30. Juni – 22. Juli 2016 – Zwischenzeitlich hatten wir unsere Fl├╝ge zur├╝ck nach Europa gebucht. Irgendwie f├╝hlte sich diese Reise nicht mehr richtig an, wir freuten uns ├╝ber nichts und niemanden mehr und waren auch k├Ârperlich ziemlich ausgelaugt. Bis vor kurzem hatten wir noch mit so vielen Dingen immer Gl├╝ck: wir trafen auf die richtigen Menschen, das Wetter war fast immer so, wie wir es uns vorgestellt hatten und wir fuhren durch aufregende und abwechslungsreiche Landschaften. Die letzten Monate waren anders. Wir genossen eigentlich gar nichts mehr: nicht unsere Freiheit und noch viel weniger unserer Umgebung. Wir waren richtiggehend reisem├╝de und hatten so gar keine Lust mehr, unser Zelt jeden Tag woanders aufzustellen. Dazuhin noch bei Wind und Regen. Die wenigen Menschen, die wir unterwegs trafen waren auch nicht so, wie wir erhofft hatten. Das alles machte uns ziemlich depressiv. Normalerweise k├Ânnen wir uns gegenseitig motivieren, da es meistens einem von uns besser ging, doch auch das war jetzt nicht mehr der Fall. Und da wir an keinem Wettrennen teilnahmen noch uns irgendetwas beweisen mussten buchten wir also Fl├╝ge zur├╝ck nach Europa.

Leaving Edson campground
Am Campingplatz in Edson

dscf3181

Aber noch durften wir ein Paar Wochen Radeln, denn das machte uns noch immer Spa├č: drau├čen sein und in die Pedale treten. Wir befanden uns mittlerweile auf dem Weg zum Jasper und Banff Nationalpark in den Rocky Mountains. Wir waren uns allerdings nicht bewusst, dass wir genau am Kanada-Tag-Wochenende unterwegs waren – ein langes Wochenende, an dem alle Kanadier anscheinend in den Park wollten und wir so gemeinsam mit tausenden motorisierten Touristen in den Park einrollten. Wir hatten einmalige Aussichten bei extremem Verkehr. Uns war auch nicht wirklich klar, wie teuer es eigentlich war, um Zeit im Park zu verbringen und ├Ąrgerten uns ein bisschen dar├╝ber, dass wir genauso viel bezahlen mussten, wie alle Autofahrer auch. Denn hier wird nach Kopf und nicht nach Fahrzeug bezahlt. Noch nerviger war, dass alle Campingpl├Ątze voll waren und noch nicht einmal f├╝r unser kleines Zelt ein Platz frei war.

dscf3198

We're not the only ones :-(
Wir sind nicht allein┬á­čśŽ

dscf3215

With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park
Mit unserer Warm Shower Gastgeberin Sue und ihrer Tochter in Hinton – letzte Stadt vor dem Nationalpark.

W├Ąhrend wir uns ├╝berlegten, was wir tun sollten, kam ein Ranger auf uns zu und bot uns an, neben ihrer H├╝tte auf dem nahegelegenen Campingplatz zu ├╝bernachten. Wir akzeptierten sofort. Am Campingplatz warnten sie uns allerdings vor einem Schwarzb├Ąren, der derzeit hier sein Unwesen trieb. Trotzdem stellten wir unser Zelt neben dem H├Ąuschen der Ranger auf und waren froh dort zu sein, da wir sowohl Bad als auch K├╝che mitbenutzen durften w├Ąhrend es drau├čen wieder einmal in Str├Âmen regnete.

dscf3229

Unfortunately people still get out of their vehicles when they see animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies
Trotz zahlreicher Warnungen verlassen viele ihre Autos, nur um tolle Selfies zu schie├čen.

Es regnete die ganze Nacht durch, aber unser Zelt blieb trocken. Gegen 10 Uhr setzte sich die Sonne endlich durch und wir konnten im Trockenen weiterradeln. Unsere n├Ąchste Destination war Jasper, wo wir ein Paar Tage bleiben wollten, um von dort Tagestouren in die Umgebung zu machen. Die Landschaft um uns herum war fantastisch und wir versuchten, die vielen Autos auszublenden und uns nicht aufzuregen. Pl├Âtzlich sahen wir in der Ferne einige Elche, die in unsere Richtung durch einen See hindurch stapften. Auch das war wundersch├Ân anzusehen und wir waren auch die ersten, die die Elche bemerkt hatten. Innerhalb k├╝rzester Zeit hielten allerdings mindestens 50 Autos am Stra├čenrand und sicher ├╝ber 100 Menschen machten Selfies mit den Elchen, als w├Ąren sie irgendwelche zahmen Haustiere.

Yes, there is still some traffic
Ja, ja, immer noch viel Verkehr

p1260522

dscf3436

Yes, still some traffic

dscf3407
Ewig langer Frachtzug im Hintergrund

dscf3278 dscf3308 dscf3311

In Jasper hatten wir Gl├╝ck, dass der Campingplatz immer einige Pl├Ątze f├╝r Radler und Wanderer freihielt und wir mussten nicht wild zelten. Dort trafen wir Greg, einen kanadischen Lehrer an einer First Nation Schule, den wir die n├Ąchsten Tage noch ├Âfters treffen sollten. Wir haben auch Willi, Anne und Arthur getroffen – eine supernette deutsche Familie, die uns zweimal zum Abendessen eingeladen hatte, weil sie von unserer Reise so beeindruckt waren. Wir fuhren mit ihnen auch zum wundersch├Ânen Lake Maligne, wo wir ein bisschen wanderten.

p1260562

dscf3484

Maligne Lake...
Auf dem Weg zum Maligne Lake

p1260563

The Germans in their canoes
Mit der Vermietung von Kanus wird am Maligne Lake viel Geld verdient
Rain drops falling
Es regnet…
With Anne, Willi and Arthur
Mit Anne, Willi und Arthur

Ab jetzt gab es f├╝r uns nur noch eine Stra├če durch den Nationalpark. Der Verkehr war deutlich geringer je weiter wir in den Park hineinfuhren und das Radeln hat hier wieder sehr viel Spa├č gemacht: die Landschaft ├Ąnderte sich st├Ąndig, wir sahen einige wilde Tiere einschlie├člich B├Ąren und schafften es immer rechtzeitig zu einem der Wildnis-Campingpl├Ątze. Diese Campingpl├Ątze sind sehr einfach, meist gibt es nur ein Plumpsklo, Feuerholz und wenn wir Gl├╝ck hatten Trinkwasser. Auf jedem Stellplatz standen B├Ąnke und ein Tisch und so mussten wir nicht auf dem Boden kochen und essen. Wir haben nur sehr selten andere Camper gesehen, da sich die Pl├Ątze meist auf einer gro├čen Fl├Ąche im Wald verteilten.

dscf3728 dscf3742 p1260612 p1260606

dscf3849 dscf3864 dscf3977 dscf4053 dscf4061 dscf4091 p1260632 p1260634

dscf4121 dscf4131 dscf4197

dscf4250 dscf4279 dscf4365 dscf4402 dscf4416 dscf4487 dscf4506 dscf4529 dscf4589

In Lake Louise trafen wir wieder auf Greg. Wir kamen am sp├Ąten Nachmittag an und ergatterten uns den letzten freien Campingplatz (es war an der Zeit f├╝r uns, mal wieder zu duschen). Da wir zu m├╝de waren, um selbst zu kochen, g├Ânnten wir uns ein Abendessen im Restaurant. Dort sa├č dann schon Greg, der gen├╝sslich seinen Hamburger verschlang. Er war eben erst angekommen und wollte eigentlich im Hostel ├╝bernachten, das war aber schon voll. Nun musste er also auch wieder zelten. Da wir wussten, dass er auch auf dem Campingplatz keine Chance hatte, boten wir ihm an, sein Zelt bei uns aufzuschlagen. Und so verbrachten wir ein Paar gemeinsame Tage in Lake Louise, Greg wandernd und wir radelnd: Nach Lake Moraine und zum See Louise. Da die Parkpl├Ątze bei den Seen bereits ├╝berf├╝llt waren, schloss die Polizei kurzerhand die Stra├če zum Lake Moraine und wir konnten fast alleine die 15km zum See hochradeln. Seit ich mit Johan zusammen bin wollte er mit mir nach Kanada zum Skifahren reisen und mir Lake Louise zeigen. Er hatte hieran sch├Âne und romantische Erinnerungen. Allerdings war er dort im Alter von 12 Jahren mit seiner Gro├čmutter und das ist immerhin schon mehr als 40 Jahre her. In der Zwischenzeit hat sich dann doch einiges ver├Ąndert und von Romantik ist mit Tausenden von Touristen nicht mehr viel ├╝brig gebliebenen. Daher waren wir beide ziemlich entt├Ąuscht und fuhren nach ein Paar Fotos schnell wieder zur├╝ck.

Time for a good drip coffee
Zeit f├╝r einen leckeren Filterkaffee…
...with some porridge.
…mit Porridge.
Peaceful Lake Moraine
Friedlicher Lake Moraine
...and busy Lake Louise
…und total ├╝berf├╝llter Lake Louise

Bis nach Banff galt es noch einige Gipfel zu ├╝berwinden. Wir sahen absolut atemberaubende kristallkare Seen von weit oben und konnten sogar ein Paar sch├Âne Sommertage genie├čen. Als wir dann in Banff ankamen, sch├╝ttete es wieder aus allen K├╝beln und das tagelang. Auf dem Campingplatz bekamen wir zum Gl├╝ck eine Plane, die wir ├╝ber unseren Platz spannten, damit wir im Trockenen kochen konnten. Leider konnten wir aufgrund des zu schlechten Wetters nicht wandern oder Ausfl├╝ge machen und so fuhren wir nach zwei Tagen weiter in Richtung Calgary.

dscf4827 dscf4839 dscf4858

dscf4882 dscf4888 dscf4902

Final picture in the National Park
Letztes Foto im Nationalpark

Johans Onkel Reinier emmigrierte in den fr├╝hen 50er-Jahren nach Kanada und jetzt hatten wir die Gelegenheit, ihn und seine Familie zu besuchen. Reinier ist verheiratet und hat drei S├Âhne und da wir ├╝ber eine Woche in Calgary verbrachten, konnten wir auch fast alle besuchen.

Aus Anchorage hatten wir ein riesiges Paket vorausgeschickt mit Ersatzteilen, neuen Klamotten und Geschenken von Menschen, die wir unterwegs getroffen hatten, um ein bisschen an Gewicht loszuwerden. Beim ersten Abendessen mit Reiner und seiner Frau Ann freuten wir uns schon auf unser Paket. Wir mussten uns allerdings sagen lassen, dass all unsere Sachen in einem Bibelladen verkauft worden sind. Als das Paket vor ein Paar Monaten ankam wussten Johans Verwandte nicht mehr, was sie damit machen sollten und woher es kam und dachten, das sei im Second-Hand-Shop wohl am besten aufgehoben. Es dauerte einige Tage, bis wir ├╝ber diesen Schock hinwegkamen. Am Ende haben wir dann alles geregelt und k├Ânnen heute dar├╝ber schmunzeln. Wir hatten trotz allem eine sehr sch├Âne Zeit in Calgary, wurden lecker bekocht – sogar mit Johans holl├Ąndischer Lieblingsspeise – und am Ende waren wir traurig, wieder abreisen zu m├╝ssen. Denn wir wissen ja nicht, wann und ob wir sie ├╝berhaupt noch einmal wiedersehen.

dscf4935 dscf4950

p1260789

With Johan's family
Mit Johans Familie

p1260803 p1260806

From a big mess...
Vom Riesen-Saustall…
...to four well-organised packages.
…zu vier nett eingepackten Paketen.
Final photo before takeoff
Letztes Foto bevor der Flug geht.