Through the Iranian Desert

619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)
619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)

25 October – 5 November, 2015 – We were ready to leave before 8am after a bad night’s sleep with noisy neighbors when two men from the local newspaper approached us for an interview without even asking if it was OK for us. Thirty minutes and many questions and photos later we left the mosque with a bag full of raisins and walnuts – a gift from the journalists. They filmed us while we were leaving the city and wished us good luck for our next part of the trip through the desert.

We were now looking forward to quiet roads and starry nights. The first night we camped behind some abandoned stables off the highway and while cooking dinner we were approached by a man in a car.  For minutes he talked in Farsi to us. When he finally noticed that we didn’t understand a word, he left again. We wondered for a while how he found us as we had followed a small track and thought nobody could see us here.

This is our daily bread - not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
This is our daily bread, best eaten fresh from the bakery as it feels like chewing on cardboard after a few hours – not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
Photo session at the mosque
Photo session at the mosque
One of the reporters
Reporter 1 and photographer…
...and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions.
…and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions and with our bag full of raisins and walnuts..

DSCF0663

Finally an empty road
Finally an empty road
There is still some life in the desert
There is still some life in the desert
Who's the camel?
Who’s the camel?
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Preparing breakfast...
Preparing breakfast…
Breakfast at a what we thought well-hidden place
…eating breakfast!
A typical desert village
A typical desert village

During the day temperatures still climbed well beyond 30 degrees and the cloudless sky and treeless desert left us with nowhere to shelter from the heat. Every once in a while people would stop to give us food or just ask if we were OK or needed anything. In the early afternoon we reached a small desert town and were stopped by a police car. By the time I caught up with Johan, he was surrounded by four men – three policemen and an English teacher. I got a little worried only to learn later, that the police had seen us earlier and as they didn’t speak English they had picked up the English teacher to welcome us. They wanted to make sure we would find a good place to sleep and food for the evening. I was overwhelmed when the English teacher asked us to tell our friends and families at home that Iranians are good people. That was not the first time we were asked that. Iranians feel pretty misunderstood by the Western world and they are extremely keen on being seen as hospitable and kind. Often we would be asked if we also thought that all Iranians are terrorists, as this is – according to their understanding – what BBC and CNN would broadcast.

DSCF0685

Another village
Another village

DSCF0751

Relaxing at the guesthouse
Lunch break
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling

After three days of difficult cycling through undulating barren landscapes and daily headwinds we reached the desert town Tabas from where we took the train to Yazd. Iran is four times the size of Germany or three times the size of France which made it impossible for us to cycle every single stretch. Trains in Iran are pretty cool, but leave at pretty uncool times, which again makes them very cool, as they are empty and a lot of train staff takes care of a few passengers. Our train left at 2am in the morning and we got our own comfortable sleeping compartment and our bikes got their own next to us. In fact, we were the only passengers in our carriage. In the morning we had breakfast in the train restaurant and we felt a bit like sitting in the famous Orient-Express.

Change of scenery
Change of scenery
Sand dunes
Sand dunes
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius

DSCF0990

DSCF1025

At the mosque in Tabas
At the mosque in Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
In the mosque
In the mosque
And the mosque at night
And the mosque at night
Leaving Tabas by train
Leaving Tabas by train
Sleeping in the train...
Sleeping in the train…
...and breakfast with the train staff
…and breakfast with the train staff.

In Yazd we checked into a far too expensive hotel for a shabby room and filthy shared bathrooms only to change the next day to a traditional hotel at the same price with our own clean bathroom. Yazd is one of the highlights in Iran with its forests of windtowers, the so-called badgirs and winding lanes through the mud-brick old town. We cycled through a labyrinth of small alleys, got lost in the huge covered bazaar and chilled with good coffee and food in one of the many rooftop restaurants while enjoying a fabulous vista of old Yazd.

Impressions of Yazd: 

DSCF1304
The famous badgirs (wind towers) of Yazd – formerly used as air-conditioning
Cycling through the narrow alleys
Cycling through the narrow alleys
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
Sweets shop
Sweets shop
The dome of a mosque
The dome of a mosque
Imam Hossein celebrations
Imam Hossein celebrations

DSCF1491

DSCF1647

Praying
Praying

P1230459

At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
At the bazaar
At the bazaar

From Yazd we continued once more North in the direction of famous Esfahan. Unfortunately the wind had changed and instead of coming from the South it now blew straight into our faces. Cranky we continued anyway. Wind is the most unfair cycling condition and without doubt the most hated by cyclists. As our cycling friend Annika from Tasting Travels nicely put it in one of her blog posts: Mountains are fair as you know that after a long climb a downhill will follow. However, you cannot expect that a headwind turns into a tailwind the next day. Nonetheless we pedaled on and gave up at around lunchtime to visit an old castle from 4000 BC and the beautiful and much less touristy mud-brick town Meybod.

Roadside billboards
A typical roadside billboard…
...and another one!
…and another one!
At the Maybod castle
At the Meybod citadel
Always searching for the perfect shot :-)
Always searching for the perfect shot 🙂
The castle in its full glory or what's left from it
The citadel in its full glory or what’s left from it
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn't allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn’t allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!

DSCF1983

Meybod
Meybod

DSCF2042

Shopping
Shopping

Even though we were still cycling through the desert it was clearly getting winter. The evenings and nights were cold with temperatures close to or below 0 degrees Celsius and during the day the quicksilver seldom climbed over 20 degrees anymore. On our way to Esfahan we camped two more times, once for free behind a what we thought abandoned caravanserai. We had just finished our abundant dinner of two hard boiled eggs each and were ready to crawl into our sleeping bags, when a car passed. It seemed that there were still people living at the caravanserai, but they either hadn’t seen us or weren’t interested, they left us alone all night. The second night we camped for very little money in a hotel garden.

At a police checkpoint. They would always exhibit terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving
At a police checkpoint. They would always show terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving

DSCF2093

Another quiet campspot behind a caravanserai
Another quiet camp spot behind a caravanserai

DSCF2095

Selfie with a 'roadworker'
Selfie with a ‘roadworker’
What is he doing there?
What is he doing there?
The truck drivers love their Macks
The truck drivers love their Macks

Thanks to the headwind we made very little progress and needed four full days to reach Esfahan. The scenery was relatively boring compared to what we had seen before and on top we were cycling on busy roads without shoulders and often had to leave the road to avoid collisions with passing trucks. The last 40 kilometers into Esfahan were absolutely dreadful with extreme heavy truck traffic. We must have breathed in tons of diesel exhaust and cycling didn’t feel very healthy anymore. Additionally we were cycling through a vast industrial area with mainly steel and petrochemical plants. That day I thought to myself that this might be the first day we wouldn’t get anything from passing people. But also this time I was wrong. Right at the entrance of Esfahan we were handed over two pomegranates, 500 meters further we got a rice-dish – perfect for us as it was lunchtime. In the middle of the busy traffic in the city center a man stuck his hand out of his open car window with a bucket full of a yummy rice-and-saffron dessert. Iranians treated us once again very well!

DSCF2102

We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn't stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car :-)
We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn’t stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car 🙂
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km

DSCF2136

To avoid the worst
To avoid the worst

DSCF2166

And now me?
And now me?
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road

Durch die Wüste Irans

Bildschirmfoto 2015-12-25 um 11.48.30
619km, 2.659 Höhenmeter ( insgesamt 3.753km und 29.872 Höhenmeter)

25. Oktober – 5. November 2015 – Nach einer sehr schlecht geschlafenen Nacht mit lärmenden Nachbarn waren wir trotzdem um 8 Uhr startklar. Plötzlich kamen zwei Reporter der lokalen Zeitung auf uns zugestürmt, und begannen, uns zu interviewen ohne uns zu fragen, ob wir das auch wollten. Nach einer halben Stunde, vielen Fragen und Fotos machten konnten wir uns endlich auf den Weg – aber erst, nachdem wir eine Riesentüte mit Rosinen und Walnüssen verstaut hatten – ein Geschenk der Journalisten. Sie filmten uns noch, wie wir aus der Stadt rausfuhren und riefen uns “Good luck” hinterher. Jetzt freuten wir uns auf die Wüste und etwas ruhigere Straßen und die nächtlichen Sternenhimmel. In der ersten Nacht zelteten wir hinter verlassenen Ställen abseits der Straße. Als wir kochten, kam plötzlich ein Mann in seinem Auto angefahren und sprach minutenlang in Farsi auf Johan ein. Als ihm dann endlich klar wurde, dass Johan kein Wort verstand, zog er wieder von dannen. Wir wunderten uns noch eine Weile, wie er uns hatte finden können, da wir einem kleinen Sandpfad in die Wüste folgten und hinter den Ställen waren wir eigentlich von der Straße aus nicht zu sehen.

This is our daily bread - not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
Unser tägliches Brot, das am Besten frisch gegessen wird, da es sich nach ein Paar Stunden anfühlt, als kaue man auf Pappkarton.
Photo session at the mosque
Fotosession in der Moschee
One of the reporters
Reporter 1 und Fotograf…
...and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions.
…und Reporter 2, der Englischlehrer, der die Fragen stellte mit unseren Rosinen und Walnüssen..

DSCF0663

Finally an empty road
Endlich leere Straßen
There is still some life in the desert
Es gibt noch Leben in der Wüste
Who's the camel?
Wer ist hier das Kamel?
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Wunderbarer Zeltplatz
Preparing breakfast...
Frühstück wird vorbereitet…
Breakfast at a what we thought well-hidden place
…und schnell verzehrt!
A typical desert village
Ein typisches Wüstendorf

Tagsüber kletterten die Temperaturen weit über 30 Grad und ein wolkenloser Himmel und die baumlose Wüste boten keinerlei Schatten. Immer wieder hielten Autofahrer an, um uns etwas zu essen zu geben oder um nur nachzufragen, ob alles in Ordnung sei. Eines frühen Nachmittags erreichten wir eine kleine Wüstenstadt, an deren Stadtrand wir von einem Polizeiauto und vier Männern empfangen wurden. Mir wurde zunächst etwas mulmig, nur um dann zu erfahren, dass die Polizisten uns bereits vor ein Paar Stunden gesehen hatten. Da sie selbst kein Englisch sprachen, holten sie sich den Englischlehrer, der uns begrüßte und erklären sollte, wo wir schlafen und essen könnten. Darüber war ich schon äußerst positiv überrascht, haben wir doch so viele Gruselgeschichten von der iranischen Polizei gehört. Als uns dann später der Englischlehrer noch bat, dass wir doch unseren Freunden und Familien zuhause erzählen sollten, dass Iraner gute Menschen seien, waren wir beide sehr gerührt. Und das passierte uns nicht zum ersten Mal. Iraner fühlen sich vom Westen ziemlich missverstanden und sind sehr darauf bedacht, als gastfreundlich und liebenswürdig angesehen zu werden. Oft wurden wir sogar gefragt, ob wir auch denken würden, dass alle Iraner Terroristen seien, da dies ja schließlich das sei, worüber die Medien im Westen berichten.

DSCF0685

Another village
Ein anderes Wüstendorf

DSCF0751

Relaxing at the guesthouse
Mittagspause
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling
Mein Outfit, Gegenwind und Hitze erschweren das Wüstenradeln

Nach drei sehr schweren Tagen durch hügelige und karge Landschaften mit täglichem Gegenwind kamen wir in der Wüstenstadt Tabas an, von wo aus wir den Zug nach Yazd nahmen. Iran ist viermal so groß wie Deutschland oder dreimal so groß wie Frankreich, wodurch es uns zeitlich nicht möglich war, jeden Kilometer per Rad zurückzulegen. Züge im Iran sind übrigens ziemlich cool, die Abfahrtszeiten dagegen ziemlich uncool, was Züge wiederum sehr cool macht, da sie leer sind und sich viel Zugpersonal um wenig Reisende kümmern kann. Unser Zug fuhr um 2 Uhr morgens ab und wir hatten ein eigenes, komfortables Abteil ganz für uns alleine, ein weiteres bekamen unsere Räder. Tatsächlich hatten wir sogar einen ganzen Waggon für uns alleine. Am Morgen frühstückten wir dann im  Bordrestaurant und fühlten uns ein bisschen wie im Orientexpress.

Change of scenery
Endlich ändert sich die Landschaft ein wenig
Sand dunes
Sanddünen
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius
Mittagsschläfchen bei ungefähr 40 Grad Celsius

DSCF0990

DSCF1025

At the mosque in Tabas
Vor der Moschee in Tabak
The gardens of Tabas
In den Gärten von Tabas
In the mosque
In der Moschee
And the mosque at night
Und die Moschee bei Nacht
Leaving Tabas by train
Mitten in der Nacht am Bahnhof von Tabas
Sleeping in the train...
Ein Schlafplatz im Zug…
...and breakfast with the train staff
…und Frühstück mit dem Zugpersonal.

In Yazd angekommen bezahlten wir die erste Nacht viel zu viel Geld für ein schäbiges Zimmer und dreckige Gemeinschaftsbäder und suchten uns am nächsten Tag ein traditionelles Hotel zum gleichen Preis, allerdings mit eigenem Badezimmer. Yazd zählt zu den touristischen Highlights Irans mit seinen vielen Windtürmen, die sogenannten Badgirs und sich windenden Gassen mit Lehmbauten in der Altstadt. Wir radelten durch ein Labyrinth kleiner Straßen, verliefen uns im riesigen Basar und genossen leckeren Kaffee und gutes Essen in einem der zahlreichen Restaurants mit Dachterrasse und fantastischer Aussicht über die Stadt.

Eindrücke von Yazd: 

DSCF1304
Die berühmten Windtürme von Yazd – diese dienten früher zur Kühlung der Häuser, als es noch keine Klimaanlagen gab.
Cycling through the narrow alleys
Radfahren durch enge Gassen
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
Aussicht von der Dachterrasse unseres Hotels
Sweets shop
Süßigkeitenladen
The dome of a mosque
Eine Moscheekuppel
Imam Hossein celebrations
Imam Hossain-Feierlichkeiten

DSCF1491

DSCF1647

Praying
Beten

P1230459

At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
Zoroastrischer Feuertempel, in dem eine Flamme anscheinend seit über 1.500 Jahren ununterbrochen brennt.
At the bazaar
Basar

Von Yazd ging es dann weiter in Richtung Norden, nach Esfahan. Leider drehte auch der Wind und blies jetzt auf einmal aus dem Norden. Schlecht gelaunt fuhren wir trotzdem weiter. Wind ist für Radfahrer so mit das unwillkommenste und meist gehasste Element. Annika von Tasting Travels hat das in einem ihrer Blogs einmal sehr schön formuliert: Berge sind fair, da man sich nach einem langen Anstieg auch immer auf die Abfahrt freuen kann. Anders ist das mit Gegenwind, der am nächsten Tag nicht automatisch zu Rückenwind wird. Trotzdem gaben wir nicht auf und radelten bis mittags weiter, um die wenig touristische Lehmstadt Meybod und ihre alte Zitadelle, die es anscheinend seit 4000 v.Chr. gibt, zu besichtigen.  .

Roadside billboards
Ein typisches Plakat am Straßenrand…
...and another one!
…und noch so eines!
At the Maybod castle
Zitadelle von Meybod
Always searching for the perfect shot :-)
Immer auf der Suche nach dem perfekten Foto!
The castle in its full glory or what's left from it
Die Zitadelle in voller Pracht oder das, was davon noch übrig ist.
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn't allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!
Johan versteckt sich erfolgreich hinter seiner Kamera und das wegen seiner neuen und viel zu kurzen Frisur. Ganze drei Wochen durfte ich ihn nicht mehr fotografieren!

DSCF1983

Meybod
Meybod

DSCF2042

Shopping
Einkaufen

Obwohl wir noch immer durch die Wüste fuhren wurde es spürbar Winter. Die Abende und Nächte waren kalt mit Temperaturen um oder unter 0 Grad Celsius und tagsüber kletterten die Temperaturen kaum über 20 Grad. Auf dem Weg nach Esfahan zelteten wir noch zweimal, einmal hinter einer wie wir dachten verlassenen Karawanserei. Nachdem wir unser üppiges Abendmahl von je zwei hartgekochten Eiern verdrückt hatten und wir gerade in unsere Schlafsäcke kriechen wollten, fuhr plötzlich ein Auto vorbei. Scheinbar wohnten doch noch Menschen in der Karawanserei, aber entweder hatten sie uns nicht gesehen oder sie interessierten sich nicht für uns. Jedenfalls ließen sie uns die ganze Nacht über in Ruhe. In der folgenden Nacht zelteten wir in einem Hotelgarten für wenig Geld.

At a police checkpoint. They would always exhibit terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving
Ein Polizei-Checkpoint. Hier werden oft völlig zerstörte Autos ausgestellt, um für sicheres Autofahren zu werben

DSCF2093

Another quiet campspot behind a caravanserai
Ein ruhiger Zeltplatz hinter einer Karawanserei

DSCF2095

Selfie with a 'roadworker'
Selfie mit einem “Straßenarbeiter”
What is he doing there?
Was macht er da?
The truck drivers love their Macks
Die LKW-Fahrer lieben ihre Macks

Aufgrund des starken Gegenwindes kamen wir nur sehr langsam voran und brauchten ganze vier Tage bis Esfahan. Die Landschaft war vergleichsweise langweilig, außerdem mussten wir auf sehr befahrenen Straßen ohne Seitenstreifen fahren. Das führte oft dazu, dass wir bei Gegenverkehr von der Straße runter mussten. Die letzten 40km vor Esfahan waren absolut fürchterlich: starker LKW-Verkehr und Industriegebiete mit Stahl- und Petrochemiefabriken. An diesem Tag dachte ich noch, heute bekommen wir wohl nichts geschenkt, doch auch dieses Mal hatte ich mich getäuscht. Am Stadteingang von Esfahan bekamen wir auf der befahrenen Straße erst zwei Granatäpfel und keine 500m später hielt ein Mann an, um uns ein leckeres Reisgericht zu überreichen. Und in der Innenstadt hielt plötzlich ein weiterer Mann seinen Arm aus dem Fenster, um uns einen kleinen Eimer Reispudding zu schenken. Auch auf diesem Abschnitt unserer Reise haben uns die Iraner sehr verwöhnt!

DSCF2102

We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn't stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car :-)
Wir hatten soeben zum zweiten Mal gefrühstückt, als dieser Mann dazukam, um uns noch mehr Essen zu geben. Jedes Mal, wenn wir etwas akzeptieren, kam er mit etwas anderem an :-).
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km
Eine alte Karawanserei an der Seidenstraße, die es hier alle 30 bis 40 km zu sehen gibt.

DSCF2136

To avoid the worst
Um Schlimmeres zu vermeiden

DSCF2166

And now me?
Und ich jetzt auch noch?
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road
Leckeres Mittagessen am Straßenrand, das uns soeben ein netter Iraner überreichte

Season’s Greetings

****************************************************************************

Thank you everyone for following our journey, reading our blog and commenting on it. Thank you to those who hosted us over the past months, who gave us food or just encouraged us to continue doing what we are doing. You all are a part of our journey and will have a part in our hearts forever. You are the ones who make this trip so memorable and enjoyable. We are looking forward to new adventures and to discovering many more countries and cultures and meeting more wonderful people in 2016!

Wishing you all a wonderful holiday season and a very happy New Year. May your hearts be filled with joy and peace and may some of your dreams come true.

Bärbel and Johan

****************************************************************************

coolImage

New Clothes, New Customs – Getting a Feel for Iran

Fast facts Iran

  • Three times the size of France or four times the size of Germany
  • Population of 78 million people
  • According to Iran Journal, Iran is the country with the most plastic surgeries in the world – and we tend to confirm that, as we’ve never seen so many (wo)men with plasters on their noses or with injected lips and cheeks
  • Bordering countries: Irak, Turkey, Azerbaijan and Armenia (West and Northwest), Turkmenistan (North/Northeast), Afghanistan and Pakistan (East/Southeast)
  • Iran is home to one of the world’s oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Proto-Elamite and Elamite kingdoms in 3200–2800 BC. The Iranian Medes unified the area into the first of many empires in 625 BC, after which it became the dominant cultural and political power in the region (Wikipedia)
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)

13 – 24 October, 2015 – Getting through customs and to Iran was easy. Between the two borders I dressed up and replaced short trousers by long trousers, T-Shirt by long-sleeved tunic and wrapped a beige scarf around my head. Once our visas were checked and stamped the customs officers who had to check our luggage welcomed us, chatted a while with us and let us through without checking anything. After five strange days in a little welcoming country we were now very anxious to experience Iranian hospitality we’ve heard so much about. But first we had to cycle through barren mountainous and remote landscapes where we would hardly meet a soul. At the end of the first day in Iran we stopped at a small and desolate village to find a place to sleep but only succeeded after almost an hour. A shop owner let us sleep in his storage room that strongly smelled of gasoline.

New outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
New cycling outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel - tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel – tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
The barren landscape
The barren landscape
At our first Iranian 'homestay'
At our first Iranian ‘homestay’

We continued early the following morning still having the smell of gasoline in our noses. Traffic had picked up quite a bit as we were now on one of the main transit routes for trucks between Turkey and Turkmenistan. After all these quiet roads we still needed to get used to heavy traffic. Arriving in Quchan, our first town in Iran, felt bizarre. We hadn’t seen any Iranian women so far and suddenly the town was crowded with women dressed in their black Chadors – a huge piece of fabric wrapped around them. People were staring at us, I think not many tourists have ever passed this town. Whenever somebody could speak some English, that person would approach us and ask if they could help. A nice couple even helped us with buying me a new cycling outfit and accompanied us to many different shops until I found something suitable for Iran. I still felt a little awkward in my now even more colorful new clothes but they confirmed that there was no need for me to wear black as all Iranian women. In fact she told me that she would wear dark colours only at official occasions and for work. I was relieved as I didn’t want to get arrested by the moral police for non-conformal attire.

Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Where is the black sheep?
Where is the black sheep or is it even a goat?
One of the first villages close to Quchan
One of the first villages close to Quchan
Arriving in Quchan - a typical black religious banner
Arriving in Quchan – a typical black religious banner
A woman - finally! And a billboard with men that died in the Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.
A woman – finally! And a billboard with men that died during the Iran/Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.

It was more difficult for me to get used to the scarf and it happened more than once that my scarf went loose and I often only noticed when I saw people laughing about my clumsiness. That reaction also made me feel much more comfortable in my attire, knowing that most Iranians didn’t care too much about what I was wearing. And covering up also has its advantages: I saved a lot on sunscreen and bad-hair-days belonged to the past, even better, my hair wouldn’t get as filthy anymore from the truck and car exhaust, so I was also saving on shampoo.

What we definitely couldn’t get used to was the sudden lack of free access to information. Not only were our Facebook and Blog websites no longer accessible for us, most Western news sites were suddenly blocked after we went there more than once. Internet was slow and at times non-existing, even in big cities. Everything is controlled by the government in this country.

My new outfit - over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing :-(
My new outfit – over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing 😦

We were now cycling in the direction of the Iranian desert but still had to overcome a few mountains and passes. Until now we were still waiting for the so famous Iranian hospitality, so far we hadn’t noticed any difference to Central Asian or Southeast Asian countries. But that would change almost immediately. We were cycling uphill and – surprise, surprise – with a very cold wind in our backs. At the police control at the top of a hill we were treated with hot tea and later at a village the local English teacher would invite us to stay at his home for the night. We declined, as we wanted to benefit from the tailwind and the downhills knowing our luck with this element. The landscape reminded us a lot on Kyrgyzstan with its rugged mountains and sparse vegetation around us. Around 10km before our final stop for the day – dusk was around – a police car turned up, escorted us into town and showed us a truck stop where we could sleep for free and enjoy the Iranian staple food chicken kebab.

Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches
Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches – and trying to get used to sitting on the ground instead of a table
Potato harvest - there is clearly no lack of workforce
Potato harvest – there is clearly no lack of workforce

DSCF0376

DSCF0380

DSCF0390

DSCF0399

With our host at the truck stop
With our host at the truck stop

That night it rained heavily and we were happy we weren’t sleeping in our tent. We were now looking forward to our first real rest day in Sabzevar in a while – but first we had to cross another pass with tired legs and Johan not feeling well. Again we were rewarded by beautiful weather and stunning rugged landscapes. Traffic continued picking up tremendously after the pass which I didn’t like too much and Johan didn’t mind at all. Our rest day in Sabzevar turned out to become a rest week – at least for me – as Johan got the flu and stayed most of the time in bed trying to recover.

Coffee break right before the pass
Coffee break right before the pass
At this point we thought it would now only go down - but another peak was waiting for us
At this point we thought it would now only go down – but another peak was waiting for us

DSCF0438

DSCF0458

Arrival in Sabzevar
Arrival in Sabzevar

The day we could finally move on again it rained. We left anyhow, we couldn’t wait riding our bikes again. So far we hadn’t gotten a real feel for Iran staying in hotels most of the time. Not only did it rain, we also had to cycle against the wind. Not a good start for a long cycling day. Within no time the rain got worse and the temperature dropped. At lunchtime we luckily reached a village and knocked at the door of the Red Crescent facilities to ask if we could eat inside to get warm and dry. We were welcomed by four young guys in Red Crescent uniforms and seated on the ground in front of the heating. Of course we were not allowed to unpack our lunch and instead ate Dizi after the Iranian table – a square plastic tablecloth – was set on the ground. As the rain and wind just continued they invited us to sleep at their facilities and we happily accepted. We both weren’t keen on cycling in the rain and even less on camping in the rain. It also happened to be the first day of the 10-day-long Imam Hossein mourning ceremonies and in the late afternoon a few villagers accompanied by an English teacher visiting her family for the celebrations came by to have tea with us and ask us all kinds of questions, e.g. if we had problems with using the Iranian squat toilets. They invited us to join their celebrations at the mosque and we again happily accepted. We went by car to the mosque that was around 200m away. I then went with the English teacher to the women’s mosque and Johan continued with the men. Before we entered the mosque, I got introduced to the about 100 women already sitting in a huge hall along the walls. Everybody was curiously looking at this stranger in even stranger colourful clothes. We sat down as well and shortly after the Iranian table was laid out once more, dinner was served: bread with yoghurt, Dizi again, which is a greasy soup where you soak in bread crumbs and later add sheep meet and vegetables. The women couldn’t stop looking and smiling at me, and telling me how happy they were that I was joining them. After what I thought was a short prayer by one woman and a reply by all the other women, everybody stood up – to first take a photo with me – and then to leave. Within one hour we had eaten and the celebrations were over – only to be continued over the coming ten days. I was a bit disappointed as I earlier saw processions on TV where men dressed in black chastised themselves. I thought similar things would happen here. When I met Johan later again, not much more happened in the men’s mosque.

Saffron
Saffron – looks like crocus
The two well-known guys again!
The two well-known guys again!

P1230333

Lunch at the Red Crescent
Lunch at the Red Crescent
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star

The following morning we left after a long photo session at chilly temperatures and of course against the wind. At least the rain had stopped. We were heading into the mountains and were climbing until after 3pm before we could start our fast descend – we only had little time left before nightfall for the remaining 40km, but with a strong tailwind and a continuous downhill we managed easily. Each time we stopped for a break, a car would stop and people would give us food. By the end of the day we had collected ten pomegranates, three apples, two cucumbers, one rice pudding dessert, three bags full of pistachios, chocolate, four tangerines, special cookies from Kashmar and other cookies. We finally got a feel for Iranian hospitality. We stayed for free at a mosque in Bardeskan where we had our own room with a bed and could make use of a shared bathroom including shower. We were just preparing our dinner when we heard a knock on our door and a few locals who earlier showed us to this mosque gave us another box of cookies and invited us to their home for a tea. We declined with a bad conscience but we were keen on going to bed early as another long cycling day laid ahead.

Our room at the Red Crescent
Our room at the Red Crescent
The very basic facilities!
The very basic facilities!
...and climbing...
Slowly climbing,…
...and climbing...
…and climbing…
...and climbing...
…and climbing,…
...stopping for another important photo shoot
…stopping for another important photo shoot,…
...with some rolling landscape in between...
…with some rolling landscape in between…
...and finally and happily descending.
…and finally and happily descending.

DSCF0570

Our room at the mosque
Our room at the mosque
What's left from our donations
What’s left from our presents

Neue Kleider, neue Angewohnheiten – oder wie man sich im Iran eingewöhnt

Daten und Fakten für den Iran:

  • Viermal so groß wie Deutschland oder dreimal so groß wie Frankreich
  • 78 Millionen Einwohner
  • Laut Iran Journal finden im Iran die meisten Schönheitsoperationen der Welt statt. Und wir können das bestätigen: Noch nie haben wir so viele Männer und Frauen mit Pflastern auf den Nasen, Mundschutz oder aufgespritzten Lippen und Wangen gesehen.
  • Nachbarländer: Irak, Türkei, Aserbaidschan und Armenien (Westen und Nordwesten), Turkmenistan (Nord/Nordost), Afghanistan und Pakistan (Osten/Südosten).
  • Iran ist die Wiege einer der ältesten Zivilisationen beginnend mit den Elamitischen Staaten zwischen 3200 – 2800 v.Chr. Die iranischen Meder vereinten das Gebiet in das erste von vielen Imperien 625 v.Chr. und übernahmen die Führerschaft in der Region (Wikipedia).
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)
435km und 2,767m Höhenmeter (insgesamt 3.211km and 27.414m)

13. – 24. Oktober 2015 – Die iranischen Grenzkontrollen waren einfach. Im Niemandsland zog ich mich um, ersetzte kurze Hosen durch lange Hose, kurzes T-Shirt durch lange Tunika und wickelte einen beigen Schal um meinen Kopf. Unsere Visa wurden geprüft und gestempelt und anstelle unser Gepäck zu durchsuchen, hieß uns der zuständige Grenzbeamte im Land recht herzlich willkommen. Nach den letzten für uns sehr merkwürdigen Tagen in Turkmenistan freuten wir uns jetzt auf die iranische Gastfreundschaft, von der wir schon so viel gehört hatten. Aber erst mussten wir durch karge, abgeschiedene und menschenleere Landschaften radeln, bevor wir überhaupt eine Menschenseele treffen sollten. Am Ende dieses Tages hielten wir in einem kleinen heruntergekommenen Dorf, um uns um unseren Schlafplatz zu kümmern. Es dauerte eine geschlagene Stunde bis uns ein Ladenbesitzer einlud, in seinem stark nach Benzin riechenden Lagerraum zu übernachten.

New outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
Neues Outfit zum Radeln und zwei Gesichter, die uns die nächsten Wochen überall hin begleiten sollten.
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel - tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
Gleich am ersten Tag im Iran mussten wir einen stockdunklen Tunnel durchfahren. Und obwohl bisher die ganze Zeit überhaupt kein Verkehr war, wurde ich von mehreren LKWs im Tunnel überholt – Tunnel sind immer die schrecklichsten Erfahrungen, egal in welchem Land!
The barren landscape
Die karge Landschaft

Wir fuhren am nächsten Morgen früh weiter, noch immer den Geruch von Benzin in den Nasen. Der Verkehr hatte plötzlich stark zugenommen, da wir uns nun auf der wichtigsten Transitroute für LKWs zwischen Turkmenistan und der Türkei befanden. Nach den vielen ruhigen Straßen mussten wir uns erst wieder an viel Verkehr und Dieselgeruch gewöhnen. Unsere Ankunft in Quchan, unserer ersten Stadt im Iran, war sehr merkwürdig fühlte. Bisher hatten wir keine einzige Frau gesehen und plötzlich wimmelte es nur so von Frauen, eingehüllt in ihre schwarzen Chadors. Wir wurden angestarrt, ich glaube nicht, dass hier schon viele Touristen durchgekommen sind. Wann immer jemand des Englischen mächtig war, wurden wir angesprochen und immer wurde gefragt, ob wir irgendwelche Hilfe bräuchten. Ein freundliches Ehepaar half mir, ein neues Radoutfit zu kaufen und begleitete uns in viele verschiedenen Läden, bis ich etwas Passendes zum Radeln gefunden hatte. Auch in diesen farbenfrohen Kleidern fühlte ich mich noch ein wenig unwohl, aber die Iranerin meinte, ich müsse auf keinen Fall schwarz tragen wie all die anderen Frauen hier. Sie selbst würde das auch nur zur Arbeit und offiziellen Anlässen so handhaben. Das beruhigte mich erst einmal, da ich nicht unbedingt von der Moralpolizei wegen unsittlicher Garderobe verhaftet werden wollte.

At our first Iranian 'homestay'
Unser erster iranischer ‘Homestay’
Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Schönes Radeln bei schöner, schroffer Landschaft
Where is the black sheep?
Wo ist das schwarze Schaf oder ist es doch eine Ziege?
One of the first villages close to Quchan
Unser erstes Dorf in der Nähe von Quchan
Arriving in Quchan - a typical black religious banner
Ankunft in Quchan – mit einem typischen, schwarzen, religiösen Banner
A woman - finally! And a billboard with men that died in the Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.
Eine Frau – endlich! Und ein Plakat mit den Gesichtern von Männern, die während des Iran/Irak-Krieges gefallen sind. Diese Bilder sieht man überall am Ortseingang von Städten und Dörfern.

Mehr Schwierigkeiten hatte ich allerdings, mich an das Kopftuch zu gewöhnen und mehr als einmal rutschte es mir von den Haaren, was ich nur aufgrund des Grinsens der Leute um mich herum bemerkte. Diese Reaktion bestätigte mir dann auch, dass sich viele Iraner nicht darum scheren, wie Touristen gekleidet sind und ich fühlte mich dann auch gleich wohler. Und die Ganzkörperverhüllung hat auch ihre Vorteile: Sonnencreme brauchte ich nur noch für Gesicht und Hände, Bad-Hair-Days gehörten der Vergangenheit an und was noch viel besser war, meine Haare wurden nicht mehr so dreckig von den Abgasen, ich sparte also auch Haarshampoo. Außerdem setzte ich meinen Radhelm jetzt immer auf, da ansonsten der Schal weggeweht wäre.

Woran wir uns aber absolut nicht gewöhnen konnten war die plötzlich Zensur, und dass wir keinen freien Zugang zu Informationen mehr bekamen. Nicht nur Facebook und unsere Blog-Website waren für uns gesperrt, auch Nachrichtenseiten, die wir mehr als einmal besuchten, wurden automatisch blockiert. Das Internet war außerdem extrem langsam und funktionierte oft selbst in Großstädten überhaupt nicht. In diesem Land ist alles unter Regierungskontrolle.

My new outfit - over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing :-(
Mein neues Outfit – ihr werdet im Laufe der Zeit merken, dass das Shirt immer kürzer wird, da es mit jedem Waschen mehr einlief 😦

Wir waren mittlerweile auf dem Weg in die iranische Wüste, mussten aber erst noch ein Paar Bergkämme überqueren. Bisher warteten wir vergeblich auf die so berühmte iranische Gastfreundschaft, denn wir stellten keine spürbare Veränderung gegenüber Zentral- oder Südostasien fest. Das sollte sich schnell ändern. Wir mühten uns gerade an einem Berg ab und zu unserer positiven Überraschung blies der kalte Wind mal von hinten. Oben angekommen, hielten wir an einer Polizeikontrolle und wurden mit heißem Tee begrüßt. Im nächsten Dorf, wo wir Mittagessen wollten, lud uns der Englischlehrer zu sich nach Hause ein, um bei ihm zu übernachten. Wir lehnten allerdings ab, da wir den Rückenwind ausnutzen wollten, der bei uns ja selten genug vorkommt. Die Landschaft hat uns sehr an Kirgisistan erinnert mit seinen rötlichen, rauen Bergen und der kargen Vegetation. Ungefähr zehn Kilometer vor Ankunft – es wurde schon leicht dämmrig – tauchte plötzlich ein Polizeiauto auf, eskortierte uns in die Stadt und organisierte uns sogar einen kostenlosen Schlafplatz bei einer Raststätte für LKW-Fahrer, wo wir zur Abwechslung mal wieder Kebab aßen.

Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches
Mittagspause mit frischem Kräutertee und leckeren Sandwiches – und der Versuch uns ans Essen auf dem Boden zu gewöhnen
Potato harvest - there is clearly no lack of workforce
Kartoffelernte – von Personalmangel kann hier nicht die Rede sein

DSCF0376

DSCF0380

DSCF0390

DSCF0399

With our host at the truck stop
Mit dem Restaurantbesitzer beim LKW-Rastplatz

In dieser Nacht regnete es heftig und wir waren froh, nicht im Zelt zu schlafen. Wir freuten uns jetzt auf unseren ersten richtigen Ruhetag in Sabzevar seit Langem, aber erst mussten wir mit müden Beinen und Johan etwas angeschlagen noch einen Pass hochstrampeln. Belohnt wurden wir wieder von tollem Wetter und atemberaubenden, kargen Landschaften. Nach dem Pass wurden die Straßen plötzlich voll und ich fühlte mich auf der engen Straße sehr unwohl, Johan schien das irgendwie gar nichts auszumachen. Unser Ruhetag in Sabzevar wurde zu einer Ruhewoche, da Johan sich eine Grippe eingefangen hatte und die meiste Zeit im Bett verbringen musste.

Coffee break right before the pass
Letzte Stärkung vor dem Pass – Kaffee und Kekse
At this point we thought it would now only go down - but another peak was waiting for us
Hier dachten wir, wir hätten es geschafft, aber eine weitere Steigung wartete um die Ecke

DSCF0438

DSCF0458

Arrival in Sabzevar
Ankunft in Sabzevar

Als wir dann endlich wieder weiterfahren konnten, regnete es. Wir fuhren trotzdem los, da wir es hier keinen Tag länger ausgehalten hätten. Zum Regen gesellte sich auch noch Gegenwind und so war der erste Tag nach einer Woche Ruhen sehr beschwerlich. Es regnete immer stärker und die Temperatur fiel drastisch. Gegen Mittag erreichten wir ein Dorf und beim Roten Halbmond, dem islamischen Pendant zum Roten Kreuz, fragten wir, ob wir uns aufwärmen und drinnen essen dürften. Natürlich durften wir das. Vier junge Männer in Uniformen begrüßten uns und setzten uns vor die Heizung. Natürlich durften wir auch nicht unser eigenes Essen auspacken, sondern aßen Dizi mit den Jungs nachdem der iranische Tisch gedeckt war –  eine Plastiktischdecke auf dem Boden. Weder Regen noch Wind ließen am Nachmittag nach und so wurden wir eingeladen, in den Räumlichkeiten des Roten Halbmonds zu übernachten, was wir gerne annahmen. Wir hatten beide nicht wirklich Lust, im Regen zu radeln und noch viel weniger Lust im Regen zu campen. Zufällig war dieser Tag auch der Beginn der zehn Tage andauernden Imam Hossain Passionsspiele und am späten Nachmittag kamen dann einige Dorfbewohner mit einer Englischlehrerin vorbei, um uns alle möglichen Fragen zu stellen. Unter anderem, ob wir denn Schwierigkeiten hätten, die iranischen Stehklos zu benutzen. Wir wurden eingeladen, an den Passionsspielen teilzunehmen. Mit dem Auto fuhren wir zur 200m entfernten Moschee. Dann wurden wir nach Männern und Frauen getrennt und ich ging mit der Englischlehrerin in die Frauenmoschee und wurde den bereits über 100 anwesenden Frauen vorgestellt, die in Reihen entlang der Wände eines riesigen Raumes saßen. Alle schauten mich neugierig an und wunderten sich wahrscheinlich, was ich Paradiesvogel in meinen bunten Kleidern unter den vielen schwarzen Gestalten wohl zu suchen hätte. Wir setzten uns dazu und dann wurde auch gleich wieder der Tisch ausgerollt und das Essen serviert: Brot mit Joghurt, Dizi, das ist eine fette Suppe, in die erst Brot eingetunkt wird und danach Hammelfleisch und Gemüse. Die Hauptattraktion war noch immer ich, alle starrten mich an, lächelten und freuten sich, dass ich dabei war. Nach einem kurzen Gebet einer Frau und der Antwort vom Rest der Frauen standen alle auf, umringten mich, um mit mir fotografiert zu werden und gingen dann nach Hause. Das Ganze dauerte nicht länger als eine Stunde und sollte danach noch ganze zehn Tage andauern. Ich war ein wenig enttäuscht, denn am Nachmittag sah ich im Fernsehen, wie sich Männer in schwarz bei einer Prozession selbst kasteiten und ich dachte, so etwas ähnliches würde hier auch passieren. Und bei Johan lief das Ganze ähnlich ab, wie er mir später erzählte.

Saffron
Safran – die Pflanze sieht aus wie Krokus
The two well-known guys again!
Drei Wohl-Bekannte

P1230333

Lunch at the Red Crescent
Mittagessen beim Roten Halbmond
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star
Johan wurde von den Jugendlichen wie ein Fußballstar begrüßt

Nach einer etwas länger dauernden Fotosession fuhren wir am nächsten Morgen bei schönem, eisigen Wetter und mit Gegenwind los. Wir fuhren wieder einmal in Richtung Berge und es ging bis 15 Uhr bergauf. Danach liefen die verbleibenden 40km wie am Schnürchen – wir hatten starken Rückenwind und außerdem ging es nur noch bergab. Das war auch gut so, denn wir wollten unbedingt vor Einbruch der Dunkelheit in Bardaskan ankommen. An diesem Tag erhielten wir jedes Mal, wenn wir anhielten, etwas zu essen. Am Ende des Tage hatten wir zehn Granatäpfel, drei Äpfel, zwei Gurken, ein Reispudding-Dessert, drei volle Tüten mit Pistazien, Schokolade, vier Mandarinen, besondere Kekse aus Kashmar und weiter Kekse eingesammelt. So allmählich bekamen wir ein Gefühl für die iranische Gastfreundlichkeit. In Bardaskan bekamen wir ein Zimmer in der Moschee, wo wir auch die Gemeinschaftsduschen nutzen konnten. Als wir unser Abendessen vorbereiteten, klopfte es und die jungen Männer, die uns zuvor den Weg zur Moschee gezeigt hatten, brachten uns eine große Dose Kekse und luden uns zu sich nach Hause ein. Mit schlechtem Gewissen lehnten wir ab, denn wir wollten am nächsten Morgen früh aufstehen, da ein langer Tag vor uns lag.

Our room at the Red Crescent
Unser Zimmer beim Roten Halbmond
The very basic facilities!
Die sehr einfachen Container des Roten Halbmonds
...and climbing...
Langsam geht es nach oben,…
...and climbing...
…und nach oben…
...and climbing...
…und immer noch nach oben,…
...stopping for another important photo shoot
… wir halten für ein weiteres wichtiges Foto,…
...with some rolling landscape in between...
…genießen zwischendurch ein wenig Auf und Ab…
...and finally and happily descending.
…und freuen uns schließlich auf die lange Abfahrt.

DSCF0570

Our room at the mosque
Unser Zimmer in der Moschee
What's left from our donations
Ein Teil unserer Ausbeute

Gigantism at its Best

Bildschirmfoto 2015-12-14 um 11.19.1412 – 13 October, 2015 – The train arrived almost on time. Our bikes had to be loaded into the luggage car at the back while our beds were at the very front in carriage 17, almost one kilometer away. By the time we had loaded our bikes almost all passengers had boarded and we were running along the train to reach our carriage. In the train we shared one compartment with 5 other people and once more slept badly. At around 9am the next morning we arrived in Ashgabat, the capital of Turkmenistan and the weirdest town we’ve ever been to. It is cleaner than Singapore and most buildings are from marble adorned with gold. As per the president’s order new cars have to be ordered in white. Shattered as we were we treated ourselves to the most delicious breakfast in weeks for 40$ together at the Sofitel hotel – we must have been the filthiest guests they’ve ever had, not having been able to shower let alone wash ourselves for the last five days. We even bothered to ask for a room at a discounted rate but the hotel was fully booked. Johan secretly took a few pictures of the Presidential Palace and the Parliament – which is forbidden and can get you in serious trouble – before we took off to look for another hotel. 30 minutes later we checked in at the 5-Star Grand Turkmen Hotel, another treat where they also wouldn’t give us any discount.

Sleeping in the train
Sleeping in the train
Reception at the Sofitel
Reception at the Sofitel
Breakfast at the Sofitel
Breakfast at the Sofitel
The hotel pool
The hotel pool
Just a random vista
Just a random vista
Found another hotel for the night
Found another hotel for the night
DSCF0147
Vista from our hotel – another forbidden photo with the Presidential Palace in the background (the golden domes)

We couldn’t wait to take a shower but first things first: we hand-washed all our clothes, the laundry service with 5$ per piece was a bit over the top for us. It took us almost two hours to get ready for our own extensive cleanse, I had to shampoo my hair four times before it felt clean and dark black water kept running down my body. It took us much less time to make the room look like a complete mess, because we couldn’t dry our laundry on the balcony for there were no hooks to fasten the washline. By 4pm we were ready for a stroll through the center of town to take a few more forbidden photos of the ugliest and largest statues and buildings we have ever seen. What we liked though was their huge Russian market right next to our hotel. We could buy everything we were longing for: cheese, salami, olives, fresh fruit, the most delicious almonds and other nuts we’ve ever had and Johan even tried real Beluga caviar twice. The seller started to offer him the caviar at a price of 50$ per 100g and while Johan continued to decline she was down at 20$ within 30 seconds.

The world seen from Turkmenistan
The world seen from Turkmenistan
At the market
At the market
Laundry time
Laundry time
Ashgabat at night
Ashgabat at night

We had a few more jobs to do and went back to our hotel – without the caviar. Thanks to the bathtub Johan found the punctures in our mattresses and fixed them the same evening. I continued cleaning our panniers including content, repacked everything and by 9pm we went to bed exhausted from the last days’ events.

At exactly 6:30am we got our ordered breakfast: one cup of tea and one cup of coffee for the both of us, pancakes, rice porridge, omelette and cakes. Breakfast was served from 8am only but they offered room service to us as we wanted to leave early. However, we had to exactly order what we wanted without seeing a menu. We made clear that we needed a lot of food as we were cycling and with a big sigh and a very unhappy face she took our order. Service culture hasn’t arrived in Turkmenistan as yet. By 7.30am we were on our bikes as planned and cycled out of town in the direction of the border.

Illuminated billboard of the president
Illuminated billboard of the president
An airconditioned bus stop
An air-conditioned bus stop
Slowly getting out of town
Slowly getting out of town
Passing residential areas
Passing residential areas
The Independence Monument
The Independence Monument
Another view of the Independence Monument with residential homes in the background
Another view of the Independence Monument with residential homes in the background
Cleaners are everywhere in and around the city
Cleaners are everywhere in and around the city

After around 15km we met Christian, the Frenchman, again and exchanged our border experiences. Only 2km later we surprisingly arrived at the first border crossing. An unfriendly soldier took our passports and told us to take the bus to the customs office 35km up the hill. We tried to convince him that we could cycle, but we weren’t allowed. About an hour later we arrived at the checkpoint, had to show our passports another four times and got stamped out of Turkmenistan.

Huge and quiet roads on our way to our next border crossing
Huge and quiet roads on our way to our next border crossing
Finally leaving the capital. The sign indicates the five Turkmen provinces
Finally leaving the capital. The sign indicates the five Turkmen provinces
With Christian from France
With Christian from France

Turkmenistan has been one of the weirdest experiences ever. People were either very shy or reserved towards us. The wealthy country is dominated by the huge Karakum desert and there are little sites to visit at least on the route we took. We were glad to leave and were looking forward to our fifth country – Iran, known for its unmatched hospitality and a favourite amongst a lot of touring cyclists.

Gigantismus vom Feinsten

Bildschirmfoto 2015-12-14 um 11.19.1412. – 13. Oktober 2015 – Fast pünktlich fuhr der Zug im Bahnhof in Mary ein. Unsere Räder mussten in den Gepäckwagen am Ende des Zuges, unser Abteil war ganz am Anfang des unendlich langen Zuges in Wagen 17. Als unsere Räder mit Gepäck in diesem Chaos endlich einigermaßen gut verstaut waren, saßen auch mittlerweile fast alle Passagiere im Zug. Der Bahnsteig war so gut wie leer und wir rannten so schnell wir konnten mit je zwei schweren Taschen am Zug entlang, um die Abfahrt nicht zu verpassen. Endlich angekommen, teilten wir uns ein Abteil mit fünf anderen und schliefen wieder schlecht. Gegen 9 Uhr kamen wir in Ashgabat, der Hauptstadt Turkmenistans an, eine der verrücktesten Städte, die wir je erlebt haben. Sie ist sauberer als Singapur – überall blitzt und blinkt es – und die meisten Gebäude in der Innenstadt sind aus weißem Marmor mit goldenen Verzierungen. Auf Verordnung des Präsidenten müssen alle neuen Autos ebenfalls weiß sein. Völlig erschlagen von der Zugfahrt und den Strapazen der letzten Tage belohnten wir uns mit einem insgesamt 40-Dollar-Frühstück im Sofitel-Hotel. Wir waren wahrscheinlich die unappetitlichsten Gäste, die das Hotel je gesehen hat, nachdem wir uns volle fünf Tage nicht waschen konnten. Wir machten uns sogar die Mühe, nach einem Hotelzimmer zu fragen, aber leider (:-;) waren alle Zimmer ausgebucht. Johan machte heimlich noch ein Paar Fotos von den Palästen um uns herum, was verboten ist und wofür man in ernste Schwierigkeiten geraten kann. Danach suchten wir uns dann ein anderes Hotel und wurden 30 Minuten später fündig: wir quartierten uns im 5-Sterne Grand Turkmen Hotel ein – eine weitere Belohnung – obwohl wir auch hier nicht einmal einen kleinen Rabatt bekamen.

Sleeping in the train
Schlafen im Zug
Reception at the Sofitel
Hier geht es dann schon etwas nobler zu: Hotel-Rezeption im Sofitel
Breakfast at the Sofitel
Frühstück im Sofitel
The hotel pool
Hotel-Pool
Just a random vista
Die Innenstadt
Found another hotel for the night
Und wieder ein Hotel gefunden
DSCF0147
Ausblick vom Hotel und noch ein verbotenes Foto, da hier der Palast des Präsidenten im Hintergrund zu sehen ist (goldene Kuppeln)

Wir konnten es kaum erwarten zu duschen, aber erst mussten andere Dinge erledigt werden: unsere Wäsche. Der Wäscheservice mit 5$ pro Stück war uns dann doch etwas zu teuer und so wuschen wir unsere kompletten Klamotten per Hand, was fast zwei Stunden dauerte. In kürzester Zeit sah unser Zimmer aus, als hätte eine Bombe eingeschlagen, denn wir konnten unsere Klamotten nicht auf dem Balkon trocknen, da es keine Möglichkeit gab, um eine Wäscheleine zu befestigen. Danach waren wir dran: ich musste meine Haare viermal einseifen, bevor sie sich sauber anfühlten und die ganze Zeit lief eine schwarze Brühe an mir runter. Gegen 16 Uhr waren wir dann soweit gesäubert, dass wir uns auf Besichtigungstour begeben und noch mehr verbotene Fotos von den hässlichsten, dafür aber größten Statuen schießen konnten, die wir je gesehen haben. Prima gefallen hat uns allerdings der russische Markt, der gleich neben unserem Hotel war. Hier konnten wir alles kaufen, wonach uns gelüstete: Salami, Käse, Oliven, Früchte, leckere Mandeln und andere Nüsse und Johan hat sogar echten Beluga-Kaviar zweimal probiert. Die Verkäuferin bot ihm eine Dose für 50$ pro 100g an, was Johan höflich ablehnte und innerhalb von 30 Sekunden ging der Preis bis auf 20$ runter.

The world seen from Turkmenistan
Die Welt aus der Sicht Turkmenistan
At the market
Auf dem russischen Markt
Laundry time
Wäsche waschen
Ashgabat at night
Ashgabat bei Nacht

Wir hatten noch einige Dinge zu erledigen und gingen ohne Kaviar zurück ins Hotel. Da wir eine Badewanne hatten, konnte Johan die Löcher in unseren Matratzen noch am selben Abend reparieren. Und ich habe unsere Taschen von innen und außen geputzt, neu gepackt und um 21 Uhr fielen wir erschöpft ins Bett.

Pünktlich um 6:30 Uhr erhielten wir unser Frühstück: eine Tasse Tee und eine Tasse Kaffee für uns zusammen, Pfannkuchen, Reispudding, Omeletts und Kuchen. Da das Frühstück im Hotel erst ab 8 Uhr serviert wird, wurde uns Zimmerservice angeboten, wir mussten aber vorab und ohne Menü-Karte bestellen. Bei der Bestellung machten wir sehr deutlich, dass wir all diese Dinge essen würden, da wir Energie zum Radeln brauchten. Genervt und mit rollenden Augen wurde unsere Bestellung aufgenommen. Auch die Turkmenen haben noch nicht viel von gutem Service gehört, selbst in einem 5-Sterne-Hotel. Um 7.30 Uhr saßen wir dann wie geplant auf den Rädern und machten uns auf den Weg in Richtung Grenze.

Illuminated billboard of the president
Beleuchtetes Poster des Präsidenten
An airconditioned bus stop
Bushaltestelle mit Klimaanlage
Slowly getting out of town
Langsam nähern wir uns dem Stadtrand
Passing residential areas
An Wohngebieten vorbei
The Independence Monument
Das Unabhängigkeits-Monument
Another view of the Independence Monument with residential homes in the background
Das Unabhängikeits-Monument mit Wohnblöcken im Hintergrund
Cleaners are everywhere in and around the city
Es wird den ganzen Tag in der Stadt geputzt

Nach ungefähr 15km trafen wir Christian, den Franzosen wieder und tauschten unsere letzten Erfahrungen mit den Grenzen aus. Wir waren sehr überrascht, als wir bereits zwei Kilometer später am ersten Grenztor ankamen. Ein unfreundlicher Soldat nahm unsere Pässe entgegen und wies uns an, in den Bus zu steigen, der uns in den 35km entfernten Grenzposten fahren würden. All unsere Bemühungen, selber fahren zu dürfen, scheiterten, wir mussten Bus fahren. Nach etwa einer Stunde Busfahrt kamen wir dann endlich an, mussten unsere Pässe weitere viermal vorzeigen und ließen uns aus Turkmenistan ausstempeln.

Huge and quiet roads on our way to our next border crossing
Riesige, dafür aber ruhige Straßen auf dem Weg stadtauswärts
Finally leaving the capital. The sign indicates the five Turkmen provinces
Endlich draußen – Das Schild enthält die Symbole der fünf Provinzen
With Christian from France
Mit Christian aus Frankreich

Turkmenistan war für uns eines der seltsamsten Länder. Die Menschen waren sehr zurückhaltend und reserviert uns gegenüber. Das reiche Land wird von der riesigen Karakum-Wüste dominiert und auf unserem Weg gab es nicht wirklich viel zu besichtigen. Wir waren froh, als wir wieder ausreisen konnten und freuten uns auf unser fünftes Land – Iran, das für seine außergewöhnliche Gastfreundschaft bekannt ist und zu den beliebtesten Ländern unter Langzeitradlern gehört.