Alberta, Canada: The Final

30 June – 22 July, 2016 – In the meantime we had booked our flights back to Europe. Somehow  this trip didn’t feel as it should anymore, we didn’t get excited about anything anymore and we felt more and more exhausted. Until lately we had been so lucky with everything – meeting the right people, the weather was mostly as we liked it, we cycled through exciting and diverse landscapes. But the last months were different. We didn’t enjoy anything anymore: not our freedom and not our surroundings. We were tired of travelling and pitching the tent every day somewhere else in the rain and the cold. The few people we met weren’t really what we had expected and hoped for. On top we both became quite depressive – usually we were able to motivate each other as one usually was better off, but that was different this time. And as we were not on a race nor had to prove ourselves that we are the tough guys we booked flights back to Europe.

Leaving Edson campground
Leaving Edson campground

dscf3181

But until then we still had a few weeks to enjoy cycling – as that was something we really enjoyed: being outside and pedalling. We were now headed towards Jasper and Banff National Park. Not realising that it was Canada weekend and usually everyone takes this long weekend off we were pedalling with thousands of motorised tourists into the park. The views were beautiful but the traffic horrendous. We also didn’t realise that it was quite expensive to enter the park and that we had to pay the same fees as the cars as you are paying by head and not vehicle. Even worse we were told that all campsites are full and that there is no way we could get a camp spot anywhere.

dscf3198

We're not the only ones :-(
We’re not the only ones 😩

dscf3215

With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park
With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park

While we were discussing what to do one of the park rangers approached us and offered us to camp next to their cabin besides a campsite. We happily accepted and cycled to said campsite only to hear that a black bear has been regularly visiting the site lately and that we needed to be very careful. Nonetheless we pitched our tent next to the rangers’ cabin and felt so lucky as we could warm up ourselves inside and even used their kitchen and bathroom while it rained cats and dogs outside.

dscf3229

Unfortunately people still get out of their vehicles when they see animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies
Unfortunately people still got out of their vehicles when spotting animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies

It rained all night but our tent luckily stayed dry inside. By 10am the sun had managed to push back the clouds and we moved on. Next stop was Jasper where we wanted to stay a few days to make some day trips into the wilderness. The landscape within the park was absolutely beautiful and we tried to not get upset about all these many cars passing by. Suddenly we saw a few huge moose walking through a lake towards us. A beautiful sight and we were the first ones to stop. After a few minutes and by the time the animals were right beside us about 50 cars had stopped next to the road and more than hundred people took selfies with these animals as if they were some tamed pets.

Yes, there is still some traffic
Yes, there is still some traffic

p1260522

dscf3436

Yes, still some traffic

dscf3407
Huge cargo train in the background

dscf3278 dscf3308 dscf3311

In Jasper we were lucky that the campsite always reserved a few spots for cyclists and hikers as we didn’t want to wild camp. There we met Greg, a Canadian teacher at a First Nation School, with whom we would spend more time over the coming days. We also met Willi, Anne and Arthur – a wonderful German family who invited us twice for dinner just because they admired what we were doing. They also took us in their car to beautiful Maligne lake where we hiked for a few hours.

p1260562

dscf3484

Maligne Lake...
On the way to Maligne Lake

p1260563

The Germans in their canoes
Canoeing is a big business at Maligne Lake
Rain drops falling
Rain drops falling
With Anne, Willi and Arthur
With Anne, Willi and Arthur

From now on there was exactly one road through the National Park. Traffic lessened a bit the further we went into the park and cycling was extremely rewarding: the landscapes would change constantly, we saw quite some wildlife including bears and usually managed to arrive at one of the beautiful wilderness campsites on time. These campsites are very basic, all you get is outhouses, firewood and if you are very lucky drinking water.  There are usually tables and benches at every pitch which saved us from cooking and eating on the ground. Often you hardly see any other campers as the campgrounds are big and spread out in a forest.

dscf3728 dscf3742 p1260612 p1260606

dscf3849 dscf3864 dscf3977 dscf4053 dscf4061 dscf4091 p1260632 p1260634

dscf4121 dscf4131 dscf4197

dscf4250 dscf4279 dscf4365 dscf4402 dscf4416 dscf4487 dscf4506 dscf4529 dscf4589

At Lake Louise we met Greg again. We had arrived in the late afternoon and were lucky enough to get the last camp spot at a local campground (we desperately needed showers after a few days cycling without any facilities). Too tired to cook ourselves we treated ourselves to a dinner out where Greg already pleasurably munched on his huge hamburger. He had just arrived and wanted to stay at the hostel – but that was full so he was forced to camp out once more. As we knew that the only campground was full we offered him to pitch his tent next to ours. And so we stayed together for a few more days at Lake Louise where he hiked and we cycled to Lake Moraine and Lake Louise. Due to too many cars the police had closed the 15km-long road to Lake Moraine and we happily cycled up the mountain and to a beautiful and relatively quiet site. Since I’ve met Johan he had told me he wanted to go skiing with me in Canada and show me Lake Louise. This seemed for him a very nice and romantic place many years ago. He had been there with his grandmother at the age of 12 – more than 40 years ago. However, things have changed in the meantime and thousands of tourists made this once for him so special place a disappointing one and we cycled back quickly after we had managed to take a few photos.

Time for a good drip coffee
Time for a good drip coffee…
...with some porridge.
…with some porridge.
Peaceful Lake Moraine
Peaceful Lake Moraine
...and busy Lake Louise
…and busy Lake Louise

By the time we arrived in Banff we had passed a few more summits, saw absolutely beautiful crystal-clear lakes from high above and had even enjoyed a few sunny summer days. The day we arrived in Banff it would just pour again, for days in a row. Thankfully the campground managers gave us a tarp so we were able to cook. But we did not go on hikes or did any other tours and after two days we moved on quickly towards Calgary.

dscf4827 dscf4839 dscf4858

dscf4882 dscf4888 dscf4902

Final picture in the National Park
Final picture in the National Park

Johan’s uncle Reinier emigrated to Canada in the early ’50s and this was our chance to visit his family abroad. Reinier is married with three sons and as we had about a week left we could meet most of Johan’s family. From Anchorage we had sent a huge package with our spare parts, some new clothes and presents from people we met on the road to get rid of some of the heavy stuff we didn’t need. While enjoying dinner with Reinier and his wife Ann we were looking forward to our treasures only to hear, that they had given everything to the “Bibles with a Mission” thrift shop. When the package had arrived a few months ago they didn’t remember anymore what to do with it and where it came from, so they thought they better bring it to the bible shop where they used to work once per week. Shocked with disbelieve we needed a few days to get over it. In the end all got settled in a good way and we left without any hard feelings. We had been treated very well in Calgary – Johan even got his favourite Dutch dish cooked – and were sad to leave them behind, not knowing if and when we would see them again.

dscf4935 dscf4950

p1260789

With Johan's family
With Johan’s family

p1260803 p1260806

From a big mess...
From a big mess…
...to four well-organised packages.
…to four well-organised packages.
Final photo before takeoff
Final photo before takeoff

Alberta, Kanada: Das Finale

30. Juni – 22. Juli 2016 – Zwischenzeitlich hatten wir unsere FlĂŒge zurĂŒck nach Europa gebucht. Irgendwie fĂŒhlte sich diese Reise nicht mehr richtig an, wir freuten uns ĂŒber nichts und niemanden mehr und waren auch körperlich ziemlich ausgelaugt. Bis vor kurzem hatten wir noch mit so vielen Dingen immer GlĂŒck: wir trafen auf die richtigen Menschen, das Wetter war fast immer so, wie wir es uns vorgestellt hatten und wir fuhren durch aufregende und abwechslungsreiche Landschaften. Die letzten Monate waren anders. Wir genossen eigentlich gar nichts mehr: nicht unsere Freiheit und noch viel weniger unserer Umgebung. Wir waren richtiggehend reisemĂŒde und hatten so gar keine Lust mehr, unser Zelt jeden Tag woanders aufzustellen. Dazuhin noch bei Wind und Regen. Die wenigen Menschen, die wir unterwegs trafen waren auch nicht so, wie wir erhofft hatten. Das alles machte uns ziemlich depressiv. Normalerweise können wir uns gegenseitig motivieren, da es meistens einem von uns besser ging, doch auch das war jetzt nicht mehr der Fall. Und da wir an keinem Wettrennen teilnahmen noch uns irgendetwas beweisen mussten buchten wir also FlĂŒge zurĂŒck nach Europa.

Leaving Edson campground
Am Campingplatz in Edson

dscf3181

Aber noch durften wir ein Paar Wochen Radeln, denn das machte uns noch immer Spaß: draußen sein und in die Pedale treten. Wir befanden uns mittlerweile auf dem Weg zum Jasper und Banff Nationalpark in den Rocky Mountains. Wir waren uns allerdings nicht bewusst, dass wir genau am Kanada-Tag-Wochenende unterwegs waren – ein langes Wochenende, an dem alle Kanadier anscheinend in den Park wollten und wir so gemeinsam mit tausenden motorisierten Touristen in den Park einrollten. Wir hatten einmalige Aussichten bei extremem Verkehr. Uns war auch nicht wirklich klar, wie teuer es eigentlich war, um Zeit im Park zu verbringen und Ă€rgerten uns ein bisschen darĂŒber, dass wir genauso viel bezahlen mussten, wie alle Autofahrer auch. Denn hier wird nach Kopf und nicht nach Fahrzeug bezahlt. Noch nerviger war, dass alle CampingplĂ€tze voll waren und noch nicht einmal fĂŒr unser kleines Zelt ein Platz frei war.

dscf3198

We're not the only ones :-(
Wir sind nicht allein 😩

dscf3215

With our Warm Shower host Sue and her daughter at Hinton, the last town right before the National Park
Mit unserer Warm Shower Gastgeberin Sue und ihrer Tochter in Hinton – letzte Stadt vor dem Nationalpark.

WĂ€hrend wir uns ĂŒberlegten, was wir tun sollten, kam ein Ranger auf uns zu und bot uns an, neben ihrer HĂŒtte auf dem nahegelegenen Campingplatz zu ĂŒbernachten. Wir akzeptierten sofort. Am Campingplatz warnten sie uns allerdings vor einem SchwarzbĂ€ren, der derzeit hier sein Unwesen trieb. Trotzdem stellten wir unser Zelt neben dem HĂ€uschen der Ranger auf und waren froh dort zu sein, da wir sowohl Bad als auch KĂŒche mitbenutzen durften wĂ€hrend es draußen wieder einmal in Strömen regnete.

dscf3229

Unfortunately people still get out of their vehicles when they see animals, the more dangerous the better the selfies
Trotz zahlreicher Warnungen verlassen viele ihre Autos, nur um tolle Selfies zu schießen.

Es regnete die ganze Nacht durch, aber unser Zelt blieb trocken. Gegen 10 Uhr setzte sich die Sonne endlich durch und wir konnten im Trockenen weiterradeln. Unsere nĂ€chste Destination war Jasper, wo wir ein Paar Tage bleiben wollten, um von dort Tagestouren in die Umgebung zu machen. Die Landschaft um uns herum war fantastisch und wir versuchten, die vielen Autos auszublenden und uns nicht aufzuregen. Plötzlich sahen wir in der Ferne einige Elche, die in unsere Richtung durch einen See hindurch stapften. Auch das war wunderschön anzusehen und wir waren auch die ersten, die die Elche bemerkt hatten. Innerhalb kĂŒrzester Zeit hielten allerdings mindestens 50 Autos am Straßenrand und sicher ĂŒber 100 Menschen machten Selfies mit den Elchen, als wĂ€ren sie irgendwelche zahmen Haustiere.

Yes, there is still some traffic
Ja, ja, immer noch viel Verkehr

p1260522

dscf3436

Yes, still some traffic

dscf3407
Ewig langer Frachtzug im Hintergrund

dscf3278 dscf3308 dscf3311

In Jasper hatten wir GlĂŒck, dass der Campingplatz immer einige PlĂ€tze fĂŒr Radler und Wanderer freihielt und wir mussten nicht wild zelten. Dort trafen wir Greg, einen kanadischen Lehrer an einer First Nation Schule, den wir die nĂ€chsten Tage noch öfters treffen sollten. Wir haben auch Willi, Anne und Arthur getroffen – eine supernette deutsche Familie, die uns zweimal zum Abendessen eingeladen hatte, weil sie von unserer Reise so beeindruckt waren. Wir fuhren mit ihnen auch zum wunderschönen Lake Maligne, wo wir ein bisschen wanderten.

p1260562

dscf3484

Maligne Lake...
Auf dem Weg zum Maligne Lake

p1260563

The Germans in their canoes
Mit der Vermietung von Kanus wird am Maligne Lake viel Geld verdient
Rain drops falling
Es regnet…
With Anne, Willi and Arthur
Mit Anne, Willi und Arthur

Ab jetzt gab es fĂŒr uns nur noch eine Straße durch den Nationalpark. Der Verkehr war deutlich geringer je weiter wir in den Park hineinfuhren und das Radeln hat hier wieder sehr viel Spaß gemacht: die Landschaft Ă€nderte sich stĂ€ndig, wir sahen einige wilde Tiere einschließlich BĂ€ren und schafften es immer rechtzeitig zu einem der Wildnis-CampingplĂ€tze. Diese CampingplĂ€tze sind sehr einfach, meist gibt es nur ein Plumpsklo, Feuerholz und wenn wir GlĂŒck hatten Trinkwasser. Auf jedem Stellplatz standen BĂ€nke und ein Tisch und so mussten wir nicht auf dem Boden kochen und essen. Wir haben nur sehr selten andere Camper gesehen, da sich die PlĂ€tze meist auf einer großen FlĂ€che im Wald verteilten.

dscf3728 dscf3742 p1260612 p1260606

dscf3849 dscf3864 dscf3977 dscf4053 dscf4061 dscf4091 p1260632 p1260634

dscf4121 dscf4131 dscf4197

dscf4250 dscf4279 dscf4365 dscf4402 dscf4416 dscf4487 dscf4506 dscf4529 dscf4589

In Lake Louise trafen wir wieder auf Greg. Wir kamen am spĂ€ten Nachmittag an und ergatterten uns den letzten freien Campingplatz (es war an der Zeit fĂŒr uns, mal wieder zu duschen). Da wir zu mĂŒde waren, um selbst zu kochen, gönnten wir uns ein Abendessen im Restaurant. Dort saß dann schon Greg, der genĂŒsslich seinen Hamburger verschlang. Er war eben erst angekommen und wollte eigentlich im Hostel ĂŒbernachten, das war aber schon voll. Nun musste er also auch wieder zelten. Da wir wussten, dass er auch auf dem Campingplatz keine Chance hatte, boten wir ihm an, sein Zelt bei uns aufzuschlagen. Und so verbrachten wir ein Paar gemeinsame Tage in Lake Louise, Greg wandernd und wir radelnd: Nach Lake Moraine und zum See Louise. Da die ParkplĂ€tze bei den Seen bereits ĂŒberfĂŒllt waren, schloss die Polizei kurzerhand die Straße zum Lake Moraine und wir konnten fast alleine die 15km zum See hochradeln. Seit ich mit Johan zusammen bin wollte er mit mir nach Kanada zum Skifahren reisen und mir Lake Louise zeigen. Er hatte hieran schöne und romantische Erinnerungen. Allerdings war er dort im Alter von 12 Jahren mit seiner Großmutter und das ist immerhin schon mehr als 40 Jahre her. In der Zwischenzeit hat sich dann doch einiges verĂ€ndert und von Romantik ist mit Tausenden von Touristen nicht mehr viel ĂŒbrig gebliebenen. Daher waren wir beide ziemlich enttĂ€uscht und fuhren nach ein Paar Fotos schnell wieder zurĂŒck.

Time for a good drip coffee
Zeit fĂŒr einen leckeren Filterkaffee…
...with some porridge.
…mit Porridge.
Peaceful Lake Moraine
Friedlicher Lake Moraine
...and busy Lake Louise
…und total ĂŒberfĂŒllter Lake Louise

Bis nach Banff galt es noch einige Gipfel zu ĂŒberwinden. Wir sahen absolut atemberaubende kristallkare Seen von weit oben und konnten sogar ein Paar schöne Sommertage genießen. Als wir dann in Banff ankamen, schĂŒttete es wieder aus allen KĂŒbeln und das tagelang. Auf dem Campingplatz bekamen wir zum GlĂŒck eine Plane, die wir ĂŒber unseren Platz spannten, damit wir im Trockenen kochen konnten. Leider konnten wir aufgrund des zu schlechten Wetters nicht wandern oder AusflĂŒge machen und so fuhren wir nach zwei Tagen weiter in Richtung Calgary.

dscf4827 dscf4839 dscf4858

dscf4882 dscf4888 dscf4902

Final picture in the National Park
Letztes Foto im Nationalpark

Johans Onkel Reinier emmigrierte in den frĂŒhen 50er-Jahren nach Kanada und jetzt hatten wir die Gelegenheit, ihn und seine Familie zu besuchen. Reinier ist verheiratet und hat drei Söhne und da wir ĂŒber eine Woche in Calgary verbrachten, konnten wir auch fast alle besuchen.

Aus Anchorage hatten wir ein riesiges Paket vorausgeschickt mit Ersatzteilen, neuen Klamotten und Geschenken von Menschen, die wir unterwegs getroffen hatten, um ein bisschen an Gewicht loszuwerden. Beim ersten Abendessen mit Reiner und seiner Frau Ann freuten wir uns schon auf unser Paket. Wir mussten uns allerdings sagen lassen, dass all unsere Sachen in einem Bibelladen verkauft worden sind. Als das Paket vor ein Paar Monaten ankam wussten Johans Verwandte nicht mehr, was sie damit machen sollten und woher es kam und dachten, das sei im Second-Hand-Shop wohl am besten aufgehoben. Es dauerte einige Tage, bis wir ĂŒber diesen Schock hinwegkamen. Am Ende haben wir dann alles geregelt und können heute darĂŒber schmunzeln. Wir hatten trotz allem eine sehr schöne Zeit in Calgary, wurden lecker bekocht – sogar mit Johans hollĂ€ndischer Lieblingsspeise – und am Ende waren wir traurig, wieder abreisen zu mĂŒssen. Denn wir wissen ja nicht, wann und ob wir sie ĂŒberhaupt noch einmal wiedersehen.

dscf4935 dscf4950

p1260789

With Johan's family
Mit Johans Familie

p1260803 p1260806

From a big mess...
Vom Riesen-Saustall…
...to four well-organised packages.
…zu vier nett eingepackten Paketen.
Final photo before takeoff
Letztes Foto bevor der Flug geht.

British Columbia, Kanada: BĂ€ume, Berge und noch mehr Regen

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-12-38-19
851 km und 7.148 Höhenmeter (11.454 km und 71.557 m Höhenmeter insgesamt / Karte: Google Maps)

13. -29. Juni 2016 – In Watson Lake pausierten wir fĂŒr ein Paar Tage, um unsere Batterien wieder aufzuladen, WĂ€sche zu waschen und E-Mails zu checken. Endlich konnten wir auch wieder den Luxus eines richtigen Supermarktes genießen und Obst und GemĂŒse kaufen. WLan gab’s bei der Touristinformation umsonst. Außerdem erhielten wir einen Zettel mit detaillierten Streckeninformationen und wussten genau, wo wir auf dem letzten StĂŒck des Alaska Highways etwas zu essen kaufen konnten. Auf dem Campingplatz trafen wir Vanda, die ihren Ruhestand in einem riesigen Campingbus verbrachte und durch Nordamerika reiste. Bei ihre durften wir abends unsere Essenstaschen lagern, da es auf dem Campingplatz keine SchließfĂ€cher dafĂŒr gab. Um uns herum gab es viel zu viele BĂ€ren und wir wollten kein Risiko eingehen.

dscf2101
Riesige LKWs auf dem Alaska Highway

dscf2361 dscf2374 dscf2384

p1260399
Wieder ein Staat in Kanada abgehakt 🙂

Als wir von Watson Lake aufbrachen wussten wir, dass wir die nĂ€chsten 200km durch pure Wildnis fuhren und so nahmen wir Essen fĂŒr drei Tage mit. Das schlechte Wetter ging leider weiter und wir wurden jeden Tag patschnass. Auch das stetige Auf und Ab wollten kein Ende nehmen. Leider versperrte uns das schlechte Wetter die Sicht auf schneebedeckte Bergketten. Mittlerweile hatten wir den nördlichsten Teil der Rocky Mountains bereits ĂŒberquert und den ganzen Tag sahen wir nichts als öde Tannen wohin auch immer wir blickten. Die erste Nacht verbrachten wir hinter einer heruntergekommenen Tankstelle, wo wir uns spĂ€rlich in der dreckigen Mini-Toilette waschen konnten. In der zweiten Nacht schafften wir es zu einem ganz netten Campingplatz und wir waren froh, dass wir duschen konnten, so durchgenĂ€sst und durchgefroren wie wie waren. Im Restaurant aßen wir wohl den kleinsten und damit auch teuersten Hamburger mit einer 5-$-Salatbeilage, die fĂŒr uns dauerhungrige Radler eher wie Dekoration aussahen. Mit knurrenden MĂ€gen gingen wir schlafen und machten am nĂ€chsten Morgen unser eigenes FrĂŒhstĂŒck, um nicht auch noch hungrig weiterradeln zu mĂŒssen.

dscf2388
Viele wilde Tiere am Straßenrand – dieses Mal eine Gruppe riesiger BĂŒffel…
dscf2414
… und der ein oder andere BĂ€r durfte natĂŒrlich auch nicht fehlen.

dscf2442

p1260408
Regenradeln….
p1260410
…das kein Ende nehmen will.

Jetzt freuten wir uns auf die Liard Hot Springs, da wir wussten, dass wir hier wieder etwas zu essen kaufen konnten und in den 45-Grad heißen Quellen baden wollten. Das Wetter war nach wie vor miserabel, aber die Landschaft wurde deutlich spektakulĂ€rer mit einem reißenden Fluß unter uns und dramatischen Wolkenformationen. Klatschnass und völlig durchgefroren erreichten wir die Liard Hot Springs nur um feststellen zu mĂŒssen, dass der Laden so rein garnichts zu Essen verkaufte außer Marmelade fĂŒr 9$ und Chips. Das Restaurant war zu allem Überfluss geschlossen. Wir waren völlig schockiert, da wir uns auf die Touristinformation verlassen hatten und daher fast nichts mehr zu essen ĂŒbrig war.

Die nĂ€chste Möglichkeit aufzustocken war erst nach  100 schweren Kilometern. Die VerkĂ€uferin erzĂ€hlte uns andauern, wir könnten doch einfach 50km zurĂŒckfahren, dort gĂ€be es einen kleinen Laden. Sie schien irgendwie nicht zu kapieren, dass wir mit den RĂ€dern nicht einfach Mal so hungrig zurĂŒckfahren können. Eine weitere Frau hörte unser GesprĂ€ch und bot uns an, uns auszuhelfen. Sie fuhr auf den gegenĂŒbergelegenen Campingplatz und kam kurz darauf mit zwei Flaschen Bier, Dosentomaten, Bohnen, KartoffelpĂŒree, Brot und WĂŒrstchen wieder. Ein weiterer Mann bot uns ebenfalls Essen an und so bekamen wir noch gefriergetrocknetes Armeeessen und Energieriegel. Wir waren völlig ĂŒberwĂ€ltigt von der GroßzĂŒgigkeit dieser Menschen, die wir gerade erst getroffen hatten. Und es kam noch besser: Es regnete noch immer stark und wir radelten durch den Campingplatz bei den heißen Quellen nur um festzustellen, dass mittlerweile alle PlĂ€tze vergeben waren. Ein kanadisches Ehepaar sah uns und bot uns ein PlĂ€tzchen auf seinem Stellplatz an. Und so verbrachten wir einen wunderschönen Nachmittag und Abend mit Kanadiern – unser Glaube an das Gute im Menschen wurde definitiv an diesem Tag wieder hergestellt.

dscf2462
Oh, noch ein BĂ€r!
dscf2589
Riesige Schilder warnen vor ebenso riesigen Tieren

dscf2495

Am Muncho Lake gönnten wir uns bei einem Resort eine kleine HĂŒtte und ein exzellentes AbendmenĂŒ im Hotel, das von einem Schweizer Ehepaar gefĂŒhrt wird, da wir die KĂ€lte und den Regen satt hatten. Am folgenden Tag trafen wir Keith aus Schottland auf seinem Liegerad, der in 10 Monaten von Alaska nach SĂŒdamerika radeln möchte. Wir ließen uns von seinem Enthusiasmus und seiner positiven Natur gerne anstecken, unsere Moral war derzeit nicht die Beste. Wir trafen ihn noch einige Male unterwegs bevor er sich in Richtung der kanadischen PrĂ€rie machte und wir wieder in die Rocky Mountains abzweigten.

dscf2607
Muncho Lake
dscf2625
… und was noch von einem verlassenen Campingplatz am Muncho Lake ĂŒbrig ist.
dscf2633
Mit Sicherheit eine tolle Art und Weise, um die Rockies von oben aus einem Wasserflugzeug zu bestaunen – wenn man das nötige Kleingeld dafĂŒr hat.
dscf2638
Unsere kleine HĂŒtte am Muncho Lake

dscf2628

dscf2643
Entlang des friedlichen Muncho Lakes an einem der wenigen perfekten Sommertagen
dscf2659
Noch einmal Pause machen, bevor es einen weiteren Berg zu bezwingen gilt
dscf2673
Neugierige Bergschafe, obwohl ich finde, dass sie eher wie Ziegen aussehen.
dscf2837
Noch ein verlassenes Lokal
dscf2928
Keith holt auf
dscf2982
Und hier ist er mit seinen 2 Helmkameras als Zusatzöhrchen 🙂

dscf2672 dscf2707 dscf2728 dscf2782 dscf2800 dscf2850 dscf2851 dscf2869 dscf2877

In Fort Nelson blieben wir wieder ein Paar Tage auf dem Campingplatz, da es wieder Mal aus allen KĂŒbeln schĂŒttete. Dort erhielten wir fast Platzverweis, da wir es wagten, das kostenlose WLan zu nutzen. Da es so stark regnete und es auf dem Campingplatz außer einem Restaurant keine Möglichkeit gab, Schutz vor dem Regen zu suchen geschweige denn zu kochen, saßen wir den ganzen Tag im Restaurant und aßen auch jeder drei Mahlzeiten. Und natĂŒrlich lasen wir auch unsere E-Mails oder checkten Nachrichten (fĂŒr Blog-Updates war das WLan viel zu langsam). Zweimal wurden wir an diesem Tag darauf hingewiesen, das Internet nicht zu nutzen und am nĂ€chsten Tag wurden wir nochmals darauf angesprochen. Ich Ă€rgerte mich so, dass ich mich beschwerte, immerhin gaben wir hier genug Geld aus. Als Antwort bekamen wir nur, dass wir gerne auch abreisen könnten, wenn es uns nicht passte!

p1260456 dscf3473

Auf demselben Campingplatz bekamen wir an einem Nachmittag Besuch von einem Amerikaner. Johan war nicht besonders gut gelaunt und antwortete entsprechend kurz angebunden auf die vielen Fragen. Er erzĂ€hlte auch, dass wir so enttĂ€uscht ĂŒber die Unfreundlichkeit der Menschen hier im Land waren, verglichen mit den Menschen in Asien oder im Nahen Osten. Etwas spĂ€ter erzĂ€hlte uns der Mann, dass seine Frau ihn geschickt hatte, um die “Teenager” zu fragen, ob sie nicht in ihrem Campingbus schlafen wollten, wenn es spĂ€ter immer noch so stark regnete. Wir mussten dann doch sehr lachen und plötzlich zog der Mann seine Geldbörse aus der Hose, drĂŒckte Johan 40 Dollar in die Hand und sagte, das sei fĂŒr unser Abendessen. Er dankte uns fĂŒr die Unterhaltung und lief davon. Konsterniert schauten wir uns an, freuten uns dann aber doch ĂŒber ein Abendessen im Restaurant. Am Abend dann saß die Familie am Tisch neben uns, ohne uns zu beachten. Wir fanden das dann doch eine etwas seltsame Situation – wir hĂ€tten eher erwartet, dass wir gemeinsam essen oder dass sie fĂŒr uns kochen wĂŒrden, waren aber dennoch sehr dankbar fĂŒr diese freundliche Geste.

Nach drei Tagen konnten wir endlich weiterziehen, der Stark- und Dauerregen war endlich vorbei. Wir genossen unseren ersten regenfreien Tag seit Wochen. Gegen Ende des Tages – wir fuhren gerade unseren letzten HĂŒgel hoch – hielt neben Johan ein Auto. Zwei Frauen luden uns zu einer Party im nahegelegenen Dorf ein. Da wir sowieso bereits nach einem geeigneten Schlafplatz Ausschau hielten ĂŒberlegten wir nicht lange und fuhren hinterher. Zehn Minuten spĂ€ter schaufelten wir Hamburger und Salat in unsere hungrige MĂ€gen. Wir waren in einem sogenannten First Nations Dorf (First Nations werden in Kanada die Ureinwohner genannt) und sie feierten gerade mit viel Essen und alkoholfreien GetrĂ€nken (noch immer haben viele Eingeborenen Alkoholprobleme), Tanz und Musik ihren Vertragsabschluss mit den Weißen, der ihnen vor zig Jahren mehr Rechte gab. Bei einem dieser Eingeborenen durften wir sogar ĂŒbernachten. Alle waren hier sehr freundlich und sie wollten uns auch gar nicht mehr gehen lassen. Trotzdem zogen wir am nĂ€chsten Morgen nach einem ausgedehnten FrĂŒhstĂŒck und mit einem dicken Lunchpaket von dannen.

dscf3045
In diesem Container im Hintergrund durften wir bei den Eingeborenen ĂŒbernachten.
p1260478
Traditionelle Musik mit den First Nations.
p1260491
Nichts fĂŒr Zartbesaitete, aber gehört zur Tradition: Das Schlachten und Essen eines Elches
dscf3028
Alles wird hier gegessen – der Rest des Elches befand sich im RĂ€ucherhaus oder auf dem Grill.

Ab hier wurde die Landschaft noch langweiliger, mit unendlichen HĂŒgeln und  WĂ€ldern und der Verkehr nahm auf einmal auch dramatisch zu. Vor allem Holztrucks rasten mit hoher Geschwindigkeit an uns vorbei. Das Radeln machte ĂŒberhaupt keinen Spaß mehr und zu allem Überfluss bekam ich auch wieder Probleme mit dem Knie.

In Oneowon stellten wir uns schließlich an den Straßenrand und strecken den Daumen raus. Innerhalb von fĂŒnf Minuten hielt ein Pickup-Truck und wir ersparten uns zwei langweilige und wahrscheinlich auch gefĂ€hrliche Radeltage. Tom arbeitet in der Öl-und Gasindustrie und war auf dem Weg in die Stadt, um seine Frau zum Abendessen zu treffen. Dort angekommen, luden sie uns zu einer Pizza ein und seine Frau fuhr mit uns weiter nach Dawson Creek – Meile 0 des Alaska Highways. Wir hatten zwar ein richtig schlechtes Gewissen, dass wir die letzten 140 km nicht selbst geradelt sind, waren aber aufgrund des sehr starken Verkehr doch froh ĂŒber unsere Entscheidung.

Und es kam noch besser. Tom und Shirley leben in Edson, Alberta und so durften wir nach ein Paar Tagen weitere 500 km mitfahren und vermieden einen eher langweiligen und stark befahrenen Teil Kanadas. Sie brachten uns auf einen Campingplatz und am nÀchsten Tag konnten wir weiter aus eigener Kraft in Richtung Rocky Mountains und Jasper radeln.

Dawson Creek, Meile 0 des Alaska Highways: 

dscf3115 dscf3133 dscf3141 dscf3156

Another rainy day
Regen, Regen, Regen…
dscf3162
… aber zum GlĂŒck gab es auf diesem Campingplatz ein kleines SchutzhĂ€uschen.
Finally arrived in Etson after a long ride
Nach langer Fahrt in Edson

 

British Columbia, Canada: Trees, hills and rain

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-12-38-19
851km and 7,148 m altitude gain (11,454km and 71,557m altitude gain in total / Map: Google Maps)

13 -29 June, 2016 – At Watson Lake we rested for a few days to recharge our batteries, do our laundry and catch up on email. We also enjoyed the luxury of a real supermarket where we could buy fruits and vegetables again. There was free WiFi at the tourist information center and they even had detailed information about places where we could stock up on food on the final stretch of the Alaska Highway. We met Vanda, a retired Canadian travelling alone in her RV through Canada and the US. She was so kind to store our food bags at night as the campground didn’t provide any food lockers to protect us from the bears.

dscf2101
Huge trucks along the Alaska Highway

dscf2361 dscf2374 dscf2384

p1260399
And finally another state in Canada ticked off

When we left we knew there was a shop and a restaurant after about 200km so we carried food for three days. The bad weather continued and we got wet every day. The rolling hills continued as well but the scenic snow-capped mountains unfortunately disappeared. We had crossed the Rocky Mountains and the rain and mostly overcast sky made it impossible to see anything else than trees, trees and more trees. The first night we pitched our tent behind a run-down gas station where we could use the toilet. The second night we reached a campground and were happy to take a hot shower before going to bed. For an awful lot of money we got the smallest meal we’ve ever seen, the salad was so tiny that we thought it was just decoration. Going to bed hungry we opted for our own breakfast the next morning to make sure we got enough fuel for the upcoming hilly section.

dscf2388
Lots of wildlife – for a change a group of amazing buffalos…
dscf2414
…and of course the odd bear here and there most of the days.

dscf2442

p1260408
I’m cycling in the rain….
p1260410
…I’m still singing in the rain.

We were now looking forward to the Liard Hot Springs as we knew we could stock up on food. The weather continued to be miserable, but the scenery improved with a quite spectacular river and cloud formations between the trees. Wet to the bones and cold we arrived at the hot springs only to find out that the shop had nothing to sell other than jam for 9$ and chips. And the restaurant was closed. We were shocked as we had no more food left and the next facilities were more than 100km away. The girl at the shop continued telling us, that we could ‘drive’ back 50km to where we came from, even though we told here various times that we had just come from there and that it wasn’t an option for us on our bikes. A woman had overheard our conversation and told us that she would have a look at her groceries and give us a few things. She came back with 2 beers, cans of tomatoes and beans, mashed potatoes, bread and sausages. Another guy also offered us some food and asked us to his campervan where we got a lot of dry-freezed military meals and energy bars. We were overwhelmed by this generosity. But it would even get better: it was still raining and we cycled through the campground just to notice that all sites were taken in the meantime. A Canadian couple saw us and invited us to pitch our tent on their site – and we spent a wonderful afternoon and evening with them. Our faith in human kindness definitely got restored that day.

dscf2462
Oh, another bear!
dscf2589
Gigantic sign warning for gigantic animals

dscf2495

At Muncho lake we treated ourselves to a cabin and lovely dinner at the Swiss-run hotel to escape from the cold and rain. The next day we met Keith from Scotland on his recumbent bike who is cycling from Alaska to South America. We had a nice chat and loved his enthusiasm, something we were at the moment lacking of. We met him a few more times along the way before he turned off in the direction of the Canadian prairies while we were riding into the Canadian Rockies.

dscf2607
Muncho Lake
dscf2625
…and what’s left from an abandoned RV Park at Muncho Lake.
dscf2633
Certainly a nice way to see the stunning landscapes from high above in a water aircraft if you have some spare Dollars left.
dscf2638
Our little wilderness cabin

dscf2628

dscf2643
Cycling along peaceful Muncho Lake on a perfect summer day
dscf2659
Final rest before we pedal up another mountain
dscf2673
Curious mountain sheep even though to me they look more like goats
dscf2837
Another abandoned place
dscf2928
Keith is catching up with us
dscf2982
There he is…

dscf2672 dscf2707 dscf2728 dscf2782 dscf2800 dscf2850 dscf2851 dscf2869 dscf2877

As the weather was really bad we rested a few more days at a campground in Fort Nelson. We were almost kicked out because we dared using their free WiFi. It happened that it rained cats and dogs one day and we sat in their restaurant – eating there three times as there was no shelter anywhere on the campground to be able to cook ourselves – and of course also checking emails etc. Twice that day we were told not to use the Internet all day long (which we didn’t) and the next day we got reminded again. When I became quite upset and remarked that we are spending a lot of money besides the camping we were told we could also leave if we weren’t happy here.

p1260456 dscf3473

On that same campground an American approached Johan and started asking questions about our ride. At first, Johan was pretty unfriendly, not at all in the mood to talk but only telling the guy how unfriendly people in the West were compared to people in Asia or the Middle East. A bit later the American told us that his wife had sent him to ask the ‘teenagers’ if they would like to sleep in their motorhome in case it would rain again. We had a good laugh and suddenly he told us, that he would like to invite us for dinner. He opened his wallet, gave Johan 40 USD and thanked us for the conversation. Consternated we looked at the money and the guy disappearing slowly. Later that evening we sat at the table next to the American and he wouldn’t say a word to us. That was one of the strangest situation for us: we would have expected to eat together or that they would cook for us, but sitting next to them and pretending we don’t know each other was extremely odd. Nonetheless we of course were very grateful for the gesture.

After three days the weather improved slightly and we moved on to finish the last part of the Alkan. Happy to be on our bikes again we enjoyed our first rain-free day in weeks. Towards the end of the day on our final hill and right before we wanted to call it a day a car stopped next to Johan. Two nice ladies invited us to join their party in the nearby village. As we anyway were on the lookout for a campspot we accepted the offer and ten minutes later shuffled free hamburgers and salads into our hungry stomachs. We were at a first nation village and they had their yearly treaty celebrations with lots of free food, free drinks (no alcohol as still a lot of first nation people suffer from alcohol addiction) and traditional music and dances. One of the first nation villagers invited us to sleep at his house. Everyone was so friendly and they all welcomed us into their community and even invited us to stay another day. Nonetheless we moved on after an extensive breakfast the next morning and a nice lunch package in our panniers.

dscf3045
The cabin in the background was our cozy home at the first nation village
p1260478
Traditional music from the first nation people
p1260491
This is nothing for the faint-hearted but another tradition: preparing and eating moose meat at the celebrations
dscf3028
Every little piece of the animal will be eaten. Most parts of the body were either still in the smoke house or on the barbecue.

 

The landscape became more and more boring, rolling hills and forests and on top traffic suddenly picked up with a lot of logging and other local trucks passing by at a horrendous speed. Cycling became less and less enjoyable and every day was a struggle. On top my knees started hurting again due to our heavy loads and the constant difficult cycling over the often steep hills. At Oneowon we decided to take a lift to the next town and within five minutes a truck stopped and safed us from two even more boring days of cycling. Tom works in the oil and gas industry and drove back into town to meet his wife for dinner. Upon arrival they invited us for dinner and later his wife drove us to Dawson Creek – Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway. While we had a really bad conscience for not having ridden the last 140km by ourselves we were glad for this offer as cycling would have meant riding on a very busy highway. And it would even get better. Tom and Shirley’s home is in Edson, Alberta, and we could get another 500-kilometer-ride south to avoid another super boring stretch of roads. They dropped us at a campground and the next day we could continue cycling into the Rocky Mountains and to Jasper.

Dawson Creek at Mile 0: 

dscf3115 dscf3133 dscf3141 dscf3156

Another rainy day
Another rainy day
dscf3162
…but thankfully there was some shelter from the downpour
Finally arrived in Etson after a long ride
Finally arrived in Edson after a long ride

 

Yukon, Canada: “We never stop for anyone – we might get shot!”

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-12-25-02
1012km and 7,542 m altitude gain (in total 10,604km and 64,409 m altitude gain)

27 May – 12 June, 2016 – After exactly one month on the American continent we had reached the US-Canadian border. Actually we got to the US border post, a tiny building where they didn’t even want to see our passports nor stamp us out of the US. Our visa questions remained unanswered in the expected unfriendly tone of two customs officers. We moved on dissatisfied as we didn’t know for how long we could re-enter the US at a later point. Here they told us, that our time in Canada would be deducted from our allowed six months. They also told us, that we could only enter the US once per year on our visas. This was now the third time we heard something completely different and each time we got the information from customs officials. We continued cycling for another 25km before we reached the Canadian border post. A very friendly customs officers asked us the usual questions – how much money do you have? What are you doing for a living? Are you planning to commit a crime? Are you carrying any weapons? – we got our stamps and entered our 32nd country by bike.

p1260131
Yippie, we are in Canada

dscf0488

p1260063
…and more precisely: we are in Yukon
dscf0565
Roadside lunch

dscf0600

By now we still hadn’t spotted any bears, but as we had entered the most remote area of our journey we knew it would happen soon. We always had to carry food for several days, as we couldn’t get any proper information if there was a shop at the next gas station or not. Often we had to cycle for hundreds of kilometres through the wilderness without passing any settlements. In this Northern part of Canada the pristine landscape was gorgeous. Snow-capped mountains, lots of spring flowers along the road, vast forests, roaring rivers and lots of bears and other wildlife roaming around. In fact once we saw eight bears in just one day. Far too many for my taste, but still an unforgettable experience. They look so peaceful and friendly when grazing right next to the road in the lush green grass. More than once we got upset about tourists leaving their vehicles and getting as close as possible to the big beasts for a photo. These animals are dangerous and we were reminded of that every day when passing them on our bikes – the bears would focus on us until we were out of sight. Some tourists even blamed us for shying them away, and yes, they sometimes would run into the forest when we came around a corner but often stopped at a safe distance and stood on their hind feet to be able to better see us. We just couldn’t believe the stupidity of these people.

dscf2414
This one had just very casually crossed the road

p1260077dscf0586

dscf2323
This fox visited our campsite looking for food
dscf2673
They are called mountain sheep even though the look more like goats

p1260084

p1260274
Curious ground squirrels everywhere
p1260455
Stopping dead when this black bear crossed

Unfortunately we weren’t really lucky with the weather this time. We had rain most of the days, sometimes only a few showers per day and sometimes rain for hours. On top we struggled very often against a strong headwind, making our experience less enjoyable than we had hoped for. Very unfriendly Canadians along the route added to our misery. Service was poor and the few businesses along the Alaska Highway somehow also didn’t really bother. We understand that doing business is very hard as the season is short and most Americans taking this route to get to Alaska or the other way around travel in their huge RVs (Recreational Vehicles) only stepping out of their vehicles to get fuel. And if I write huge I actually mean gigantic in terms of size. These RVs are the size of a touring coach and behind them they are often pulling a mid-sized car or another huge trailer with often a car and a motorbike inside. One day – we were sitting in the lounge of a campground – such a bus was pulling into the parking lot and Johan told me that it will get busy now, as there was a coach with at least 50 people just arriving :-). But as always only two people stepped out of this monster. What scared us most was the fact that there isn’t even a special license necessary to be able to drive them.

dscf0320
Even cyclists get featured…

dscf0618-2

dscf2259
This is a quite small RV; the small care behind is towed behind the bus

What we didn’t understand was the fact that we were treated so extremely unfriendly. Nobody seemed to like cyclists even though we were the ones eating lots of local food – be it good or bad – and paying a lot of money for camping without any facilities. While en route on a particularly remote stretch we stopped at a commercial campground to ask if we could refill our water bottles. The owner refused to fill up two bottles of water and instead told us we could buy bottled water as his tap water was only for paying guests. We left in disbelieve and angry without buying anything as it is against our principle to buy plastic bottles while there is drinking water readily available. This sign hung on his office door: ‘If you see a bear don’t run into my office’. I think this tells enough. Later that day some German tourists filled up our bottles and we pitched our tent next to a little river where we also washed ourselves, made a warming camp fire and went to bed as tired as always.

dscf0279

dscf0862
Without these warming camp fires we would not have survived

dscf0884

In this part of the world traffic is still very little and consists mostly of tourists and some huge supply trucks on their way to Alaska. This made cycling very peaceful despite being on a highway. Unfortunately the road was at many places under construction which meant for us a lot of dust when vehicles passed but much worse: we usually weren’t allowed to cycle through the construction site. Too dangerous! The first time we negotiated hard but unsuccessful and were forced to wait 20min until works would stop. All other times we had to load our bikes onto a truck to be driven through the construction site before we could continue by ourselves. Americans are always afraid about their liability and getting sued in case of something might happen.

dscf0804dscf0824

dscf0893
Swallowing some dust
p1260135
Through road constructions we usually got a ride in these pilot cars

p1260147p1260151

One day, we had just left our campground knowing there wouldn’t be anything for the next 200km other than trees, hills and bears we spotted some red houses in the distance. Getting closer we could read a nice looking sign “Creperie” and thought that either must have survived from years ago or be a Fata Morgana. But no. There was a French Bakery in the middle of nowhere selling yummy French pastries, bred and of course crepes. Even though we had just had breakfast we couldn’t resist eating crepes and enjoying this unexpected treat.

dscf1557
OOPS, a Grizzly! Too bad we were just looking for a wild camping spot.

dscf2782

On another campground – we had cycled over 120km from the early morning until almost 9pm – they closed the toilets at 9pm and showers didn’t exist, but we still were asked to pay almost 20$. As cycling farther wasn’t an option anymore we stayed, I desperately wanted to wash myself and used the remaining 10min for a sink shower. Later they learned that they closed the toilets so early as they had problems with the truckers, who would wash themselves at the toilet sinks
..

dscf0319
At a information center where we got hot tea and coffee – for free of course

dscf0677dscf0905

By now you might ask yourself why don’t you guys just wild camp instead of getting upset day after day. We had a few reasons for that: First we were more afraid of bears disturbing our good night’s sleep while camping out in the wild and felt safer knowing there were people around. Second we could get water from fellow campers and didn’t have to filter river or lake water while still risking to get sick. And the third and most important reason was that we did not have to put our food and other smelly items such as toiletries in the trees and out of reach of bears. That would have been a mission impossible anyway as all spruce and pine trees did not have proper branches. The state campgrounds always had food lockers or waste baskets that could be opened from the back and where we could safely store away our panniers. Without anything left in the tent other than two smelly cyclists, bear spray on either side of the tent and fireworks, Johan got from one of our Warmshower hosts, we usually slept safe and sound.

dscf1004

dscf1056
Stopping to get changed – one of these days where rain was on and off

dscf1104img_8209p1260141p1260151

Most state campgrounds by the way are in the middle of nowhere at beautiful locations, with great views, next to a river or a beautiful lake and without any facilities other than outhouses and fire pits. There is no ward and you place your money for the night – usually between 10$ and 15$ – in a box by the entrance.

dscf1674
We crossed a few rivers on quite spectacular iron bridges
dscf1746
Washing dishes in a lake
dscf1827
First nation art
dscf1838
A moose we never saw alive in Canada

dscf1868dscf1875dscf1889dscf1967

A few businesses still stood out, and of course they were busy as crazy. And a few people stood out as well. There was for example our wonderful Warmshowers host Susan in Whitehorse with who we stayed a few days and who took us on a lake canoe trip. One evening at the pub with some of her girlfriends we met Dee, a visual artist working with clay and spontaneously invited her the next day for breakfast to Susan’s house to show us her artwork. For those interested have a look at her website at www.DBaileyArt.com. And there was this retired guy with his campervan who stopped for us to ask if we needed anything. Or some Americans en route spontaneously inviting us to their homes back in the lower 48 in case we would pass by.

dscf1159dscf1172dscf1255p1260169

p1260184
A beautiful lake but strong headwinds unfortunately

p1260218

p1260230
Johan was so hungry that he ordered a second meal after this one
dscf1355
Due to the late arrival the day before we treated ourselves to a shabby motel
dscf1360
An interesting church in Haines Junction

p1260234

p1260290
Ready for our mini adventure with Sue
dscf1628
Final foto with our Warmshowers host Sue

After another longer stretch through nothingness and less spectacular landscapes while crossing the northernmost Rocky Mountains we were looking forward to arriving at Watson Lake, known as the gate to Yukon (if you’re coming from BC) or for its signpost forest.

dscf1639
We met this funny Japanese cyclist when we left Whitehorse

dscf1558

dscf1691
Washing dishes again
dscf1735
Updating my diary at our home for the day

dscf1459dscf1480dscf1488

dscf1509
On one of the oldest bridges in Yukon
p1260323
An easier mode of transportation in this huge country

p1260333

p1260369
This vehicle might need some maintenance first

We stopped at the RV Park to ask for a camp spot and got the brusk reply: “No tenters”. As we weren’t aware of any other campgrounds in town we asked if we maybe could take a shower and of course pay for it, but got the same unfriendly reply: “No, these are for guests only.” We couldn’t help but ask why he was so unfriendly and were told that he didn’t like tenters, especially cyclists as they always keep their food out of their tents which attracts animals. Well, what else can you do in bear country if you don’t provide any lockers or room for food?

dscf1558
Another wild camp next to a rest area

dscf1607

p1260474
Another interesting bike setup

p1260466

Luckily there was another campground that didn’t really advertise behind a gas station with clean showers and toilets and even good washing machines. Here we met a strange elderly couple parking their RV right next to us without even saying hello upon arrival. They apologized later for being grumpy and rude, as they had driven more than 700 miles that day. The next day we told them that we were quite disappointed about the people’s attitude here in Canada as nobody would talk to each other, people stay amongst themselves and hardly take notice of others. We also told them that we found it very strange that hardly ever someone stops in the middle of nowhere when they see us to ask if everything was OK or if we maybe needed any water, knowing there was just nothing for hundreds and hundreds of miles. They then told us that they also would never stop – not even for cyclists – as they might get shot. A response that can only come from a US-citizen! For us it seemed as if most of the Americans live in fear.

dscf2187

dscf2205
Still a long way to Calgary

Yukon, Kanada: “We never stop for anyone – we might get shot!”

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-12-25-02
1.012 km und 7.542 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 10.604km und 64.409 Höhenmeter)

27. Mai – 12. Juni 2016 – Nach genau einem Monat auf dem amerikanischen Kontinent erreichten wir die kanadische Grenze. Um ganz genau zu sein standen wir am US-Grenzposten, einem kleinen GebĂ€ude und die Zollbeamten wollten noch nicht einmal unsere PĂ€sse sehen. Wir sollten noch nicht einmal ausgestempelt werden. Auch unsere Visumfragen blieben unbeantwortet, im gewohnt unfreundlichen Ton der US-Beamten. Wir fuhren etwas unzufrieden weiter, da wir noch immer nicht wussten, fĂŒr wie lange wir spĂ€ter wieder in die USA zurĂŒck durften. Hier wurde uns erzĂ€hlt, dass unsere Zeit in Kanada von unseren insgesamt erlaubten sechs Monaten abgezogen wĂŒrde. Außerdem wurde uns mitgeteilt, dass wir die USA nur einmal pro Jahr fĂŒr sechs Monate besuchen dĂŒrften. Das war jetzt das dritte Mal, dass wir uns eine andere Geschichte anhören mussten – und das immer von offiziellen Immigrations-Behörden. Nach 25km erreichten wir dann die kanadische Grenze. Ein besonders freundlicher Zollbeamte stellte uns die ĂŒblichen Fragen: Wie viel Geld haben Sie? Was arbeiten Sie? Haben Sie vor, ein Verbrechen zu begehen? Haben Sie irgendwelche Waffen bei sich? Wir bekamen unsere Stempel und reisten in unser 32. Land per Rad ein.

p1260131
Yippie, wir sind in Kanada

dscf0488

p1260063
…und um ganz genau zu sein: in Yukon
dscf0565
Mittagessen am Straßenrand

dscf0600

Noch immer hatten wir keine BĂ€ren gesehen, aber wir wussten, dass dies nicht mehr lange dauern wĂŒrde, da wir uns nun im entlegensten Gebiet unserer Reise befanden. Wir hatten immer Essen fĂŒr mehrere Tage dabei, da wir kaum gute Informationen darĂŒber bekamen, ob es LĂ€den an den Tankstellen gab oder nicht. Oft mussten wir Hunderte von Kilometern durch die Wildnis radeln, ohne an irgendwelchen HĂ€usern vorbeizukommen.

In diesem nördlichen Teil Kanadas war die Landschaft traumhaft. Schneebedeckte GebirgszĂŒge, FrĂŒhlingsblumen am Straßenrand, unendliche WĂ€lder, rauschende FlĂŒsse und bald auch viele BĂ€ren und anderes Getier. An einem Tag sahen wir einmal acht BĂ€ren. Definitiv zu viele fĂŒr meinen Geschmack, aber im Nachhinein eine unvergessliche Erfahrung. Die BĂ€ren sehen so friedlich und freundlich aus, wenn sie am Straßenrand grasen. Mehr als einmal regten wir uns ĂŒber Touristen auf, die meinten, ihre Fahrzeuge verlassen zu mĂŒssen, nur um fĂŒr ein Foto so nah wie möglich an die BĂ€ren ranzukommen. Diese Tiere sind gefĂ€hrlich und wir wurden tĂ€glich daran erinnert, wenn wir an ihnen vorbeiradeln mussten. Die BĂ€ren fixierten uns, bis wir außer Sichtweite waren. Manche Touristen beschuldigten uns sogar, dass wir die BĂ€ren verscheuchen wĂŒrden. Und tatsĂ€chlich rannten einige zurĂŒck in den Wald, wenn wir um die Ecke kamen. Meist hielten sie dann in sicherer Distanz an und stellten sich auf die HinterfĂŒĂŸe, um besser sehen zu können. Über diese Touristen konnten wir nur die Köpfe schĂŒtteln.

dscf2414
Dieser hier ĂŒberquerte ganz gemĂŒtlich die Straße

p1260077dscf0586

dscf2323
Dieser Fuchs besuchte unseren Zeltplatz, um nach Essen zu suchen
dscf2673
Das sind Bergschafe obwohl wir finden, dass sie eher wie Bergziegen aussehen

p1260084

p1260274
Neugierige Ziesel ĂŒberall um uns herum
p1260455
Ups, schon wieder…

Leider hatten wir dieses Mal nicht wirklich GlĂŒck mit dem Wetter. Es regnete fast jeden Tag, manchmal nur ein Paar Schauer, oft aber auch Dauerregen. ZusĂ€tzlich kĂ€mpften wir tĂ€glich mit starkem Gegenwind, was uns unsere Zeit hier in Kanada nicht wirklich versĂŒĂŸte. Und als ob das nicht schon genug wĂ€re kamen auch noch sehr unangenehme Kanadier dazu. Der Service entlang des Highways war unglaublich schlecht und die wenigen LĂ€den, Tankstellenbesitzer und CampingplĂ€tze scherten sich auch kaum darum. Uns ist schon klar, dass es hier wirklich schwer ist, GeschĂ€fte zu machen, da die Saison kurz ist und die meisten Amerikaner, die hier zu finden sind, verlassen ihre riesigen Campingbusse nur zum Tanken.  Und wenn ich hier riesig schreibe, dann meine ich eigentlich gigantisch groß, in der Regel mindestens so groß wie ein großer Reisebus fĂŒr Fernreisen, die dann auch noch mindestens ein Auto, wenn nicht sogar einen AnhĂ€nger, in dem dann ein Auto, ein Motorrad und manchmal sogar noch RĂ€der untergebracht waren. Wir saßen einmal in der Lounge eines Campingplatzes als so ein GefĂ€hrt vorfuhr. Johan meinte nur zu mir, “jetzt wird es voll, da fĂ€hrt gerade ein Reisebus vor, da sitzen sicherlich 50 Leute drin!” Aber wir immer kam nur ein Ehepaar aus diesem Monster. Was uns allerdings am meisten schockierte war die Tatsache, dass es zum Fahren dieser Busse noch nicht einmal eines besonderen FĂŒhrerscheins bedarf.

dscf0320
Eine Anzeigetafel, auf der sogar Radreisende vorkommen…

dscf0618-2

dscf2259
Ein noch recht kleiner Campingbus, das Fahrzeug dahinter wird einfach angehÀngt

Wir konnten ĂŒberhaupt nicht verstehen, warum wir hier so unfreundlich behandelt wurden. Niemand schien Fahrradfahrer zu mögen, obwohl wir so gut wie die einzigen waren, die hier etwas aßen – ob gut oder schlecht – und viel Geld fĂŒr CampingplĂ€tze bezahlten, die so gar nichts boten. In einer besonders abgelegenen Gegend hielten wir an einem Campingplatz, um unsere Wasserflaschen aufzufĂŒllen. Leider durften wir nicht, wir sollten Wasserflaschen kaufen, denn das Wasser aus den WasserhĂ€hnen sei nur fĂŒr GĂ€ste. Wir gingen ohne Wasser und verĂ€rgert, da es gegen unsere Prinzipien ist, Plastikflaschen zu kaufen, wenn Trinkwasser reichlich vorhanden ist. Und es geht uns hier nicht um’s Geld. An der BĂŒrotĂŒr hing ĂŒbrigens dieses Schild: “Wenn Sie einen BĂ€ren sehen, kommen Sie nicht in mein BĂŒro.” Das sagt schon alles! SpĂ€ter fĂŒllten dann deutsche Touristen unsere Wasserflaschen und wir stellten unser Zelt an einem kleine Bach auf, in dem wir uns auch wuschen. Essen gab’s an einem wĂ€rmenden Lagerfeuer und mĂŒde verkrochen wir uns spĂ€ter in unsere SchlafsĂ€cke.

dscf0279

dscf0862
Ohne diese wĂ€rmenden Lagerfeuer hĂ€tten wir Kanada wohl nicht ĂŒberlebt

dscf0884

In diesem Teil der Welt gibt es noch kaum Verkehr und wenn, dann handelt es sich um Touristen oder Versorgung-LKWs aus oder nach Alaska. Das machte das Radfahren trotz Highway fĂŒr uns sehr angenehm. Leider bestand die Strecke aus vielen Baustellen und wir wurden dort dann oft ziemlich eingestaubt. Schlimmer war allerdings, dass wir auf Teilstrecken nicht mehr selbst fahren durften, sondern unsere RĂ€der auf einen LKW laden mussten. Zu gefĂ€hrlich! Beim ersten Mal versuchten wir noch zu verhandeln, merkten aber schnell, dass wir chancenlos waren. Anstelle mussten wir 20 Minuten warten, bis Feierabend war. Amerikaner – auch in Kanada – haben immer Angst, verklagt zu werden falls etwas passiert.

dscf0804dscf0824

dscf0893
Staub
p1260135
In so einem ‘Pilot Car’ durften wir meist durch die Baustellen fahren

p1260147p1260151

Eines Morgens, als wir unser Camp verließen, wohlwissend, dass es die nĂ€chsten 200 Kilometer nichts anderes gibt als BĂ€ume, Berge und BĂ€ren sahen wir plötzlich ein Paar rote GebĂ€ude in der Ferne. Als wir nĂ€her kamen, sahen wir ein Schild mit der Aufschrift “Creperie” und dachten, das muss entweder eine Fata Morgana sein oder ein Relikt aus frĂŒheren Zeiten. Aber nein! Es handelte sich tatsĂ€chlich um eine französische BĂ€ckerei irgendwo im Nirgendwo, in der französische Leckereien, Brot und natĂŒrlich Crepes verkauft wurden. Obwohl wir gerade erst gefrĂŒhstĂŒckt hatten, konnten wir es uns nicht verkneifen, nochmals zuzuschlagen und gönnten uns ein leckeres zweites FrĂŒhstĂŒck.

dscf1557
Ups, ein Grizzly. Schade eigentlich, dass wir gerade auf der Suche nach einem geeigneten Zeltplatz waren

dscf2782

Auf einem anderen Campingplatz teilte man uns mit, dass die Toiletten um 21 Uhr schließen wĂŒrden und Duschen gĂ€be es im Übrigen auch nicht – und das fĂŒr 20$. Wir waren bereits seit 120km und den frĂŒhen Morgenstunden unterwegs, es war mittlerweile 20:45 Uhr und Weiterfahren war keine Option. Wir wuschen uns daher so gut es ging schnell in den Toiletten. SpĂ€ter erfuhren wir dann, dass die Toiletten so frĂŒh abgeschlossen werden, da sich die LKW-Fahrer aus Mangel an Duschen darin waschen wĂŒrden…

dscf0319
In dieser Touristen-Information bekamen wir sogar Tee und Kaffee umsonst

dscf0677dscf0905

Mittlerweile fragt ihr euch sicherlich, warum wir ĂŒberhaupt noch CampingplĂ€tze aufsuchen, anstelle irgendwo in der Wildnis zu zelten. DafĂŒr gab es einige GrĂŒnde: Erstens fĂŒhlten wir uns auf CampingplĂ€tzen vor BĂ€ren sicherer als in der freien Wildbahn. Zweitens bekamen wir immer Wasser von anderen Reisenden und mussten das Wasser nicht aus den FlĂŒssen filtern und trotzdem riskieren, krank zu werden. Der dritte und wichtigste Grund war fĂŒr uns, dass wir unsere Essenstaschen und Toilettenartikel wie Zahnpasta nicht außer Reichweite von BĂ€ren in BĂ€ume hĂ€ngen mussten. Das wĂ€re ĂŒbrigens sowieso fast unmöglich gewesen, da die kargen Tannen keine geeigneten ausreichend starke Zweige hatten. Auf den NaturcampingplĂ€tzen gab es meist spezielle SchließfĂ€cher, in denen wir unser Essen bĂ€rensicher wegschließen konnten. Wenn nicht, ließen sich die bĂ€rensicheren AbfallbehĂ€lter immer von hinten öffnen, wo wir dann unsere Sachen verstauten. Ohne irgendwas im Zelt außer zwei mĂŒffelnden Radfahrern, BĂ€renspray auf beiden Seiten und Feuerwerkskörper, die Johan geschenkt bekam, schliefen wir meist relativ gut.

dscf1004

dscf1056
Hier war mal wieder Umziehen angesagt – ein Tag, an dem es immer wieder regnete

dscf1104img_8209p1260141p1260151

Die meisten staatlichen CampingplĂ€tze oder sogenannten NaturcampingplĂ€tze waren immer landschaftlich wunderschön gelegen. Tolle Aussichten, fast immer an einem See oder Fluss, allerdings immer ohne Duschen. DafĂŒr gab es Plumpsklos und Feuerstellen mit Feuerholz. Meist musste das Geld in einen Umschlag und dann in einen Briefkasten gesteckt werden – in der Regel bezahlten wir zwischen 10 und 15$.

dscf1674
Eine der spektakulĂ€ren EisenbrĂŒcken
dscf1746
Beim Geschirr spĂŒlen
dscf1827
Kunst der Ureinwohner Kanadas
dscf1838
Ein Elch, den wir in Kanada nie gesehen haben

dscf1868dscf1875dscf1889dscf1967

Einige der GeschĂ€fte am Highway waren dann doch besonders gut – und dann auch total ĂŒberfĂŒllt. Exzellenz spricht sich eben rum. Und wir haben natĂŒrlich auch tolle Menschen getroffen. Zum Beispiel unsere WarmShowers Gastgeberin Sue aus Whitehorse, bei der wir einige Tage bleiben durften und mit der wir eine Kanufahrt machten. Bei einem Treffen mit ihren Freunden lernten wir Dee kennen, eine KĂŒnstlerin, die mit Ton arbeitet. Wir luden sie spontan am nĂ€chsten Tag zu Sue zum FrĂŒhstĂŒck ein und sie zeigte uns ihre Kunstwerke. Wer sich fĂŒr ihre Arbeit interessiert, kann gerne mal hier reinschauen:  http://www.DBaileyArt.com. Und dann gab es da noch den Amerikaner in Ruhestand, der einfach nur so anhielt, um zu fragen, ob wir etwas nötig hĂ€tten. Oder einige andere Amerikaner, die uns spontan zu sich nach Hause einluden, wenn wir dann wieder in den USA sind.

dscf1159dscf1172dscf1255p1260169

p1260184
Ein wunderschöner See, aber leider wieder Gegenwindp1260218
p1260230
Johan war so hungrig, dass er einen zweiten Hamburger bestellte
dscf1355
SpÀte Ankunft am Vorabend verleitete uns dazu, in diesem schÀbigen Motel abzusteigen
dscf1360
Eine interessante Kirche in Haines Junction

p1260234

p1260290
Wir sind klar fĂŒr ein Mini-Abenteuer
dscf1628
Letztes Foto mit unserer Gastgeberin Sue

Nach vielen Kilometern durchs Nichts und etwas weniger spektakulĂ€ren Landschaften und nach der Überquerung der nördlichen Rocky Mountains  freuten wir uns auf Watson Lake, das auch als das Tor ins Yukon (von British Columbia aus gesehen) bekannt ist oder fĂŒr seinen Schilderwald.

dscf1639
Ein lustiger japanischer Radler, den wir kurz nach Whitehorse trafen

dscf1558

dscf1691
Zeit fĂŒr den Abwasch
dscf1735
Das Tagebuch wird im heutigen Zuhause aktualisiert

dscf1459dscf1480dscf1488

dscf1509
Eine der Ă€ltesten BrĂŒcken im Yukon
p1260323
In diesem riesigen Land die etwas einfachere Fortbewegungsmethode

p1260333

p1260369
Und bevor wir in dieses Auto umsteigen, sind wohl noch einige Schönheitsreparaturen notwendig

Wir hielten am ‘RV Park’, um nach einem Zeltplatz zu fragen. Wir bekamen die unfreundliche Antwort: “Keine Zelte.” Da uns keine anderen CampingplĂ€tze bekannt waren, fragten wir, ob wir denn gegen Bezahlung duschen dĂŒrften, aber auch das war nicht möglich. Auf unsere Frage, warum er denn so unfreundlich sei, bekamen wir die Antwort, dass er Zelte nicht ausstehen könne, vor allem aber Radler, da diese ihre Essenstaschen immer außerhalb des Zeltes aufbewahren wĂŒrden. Ja, natĂŒrlich. Was sollen wir denn im BĂ€renland machen, wenn es keine SchließfĂ€cher fĂŒr Essen gibt?

dscf1558
Wild campen auf einem Rastplatz

dscf1607

p1260474
Interessantes Fahrradgestell

p1260466

Zum GlĂŒck fanden wir noch einen anderen Campingplatz, versteckt hinter einer Tankstelle mit sauberen Duschen und Toiletten und sogar nagelneuen Waschmaschinen. Hier trafen wir ein Ă€lteres Ehepaar, das direkt neben uns parkte, ohne bei Ankunft auch nur einen Ton zu sagen. SpĂ€ter entschuldigten sie sich fĂŒr ihre schlechte Laune, schließlich hĂ€tten sie 700 Meilen hinter sich. Am nĂ€chsten Tag erzĂ€hlten wir ihnen, dass wir so enttĂ€uscht ĂŒber die Unfreundlichkeit der Menschen seien. Niemand spricht mit dem anderen, alle bleiben unter sich und interessieren sich nur fĂŒr sich selbst. Wir erzĂ€hlten auch, dass wir sehr verwundert waren, dass so gut wie nie jemand halten wĂŒrde, um zu fragen, ob wir etwas brĂ€uchten, Wasser zum Beispiel. Sie sagten uns dann, dass sie auch nie fĂŒr jemanden halten wĂŒrden, auch nicht fĂŒr Radfahrer – man könnte sie ja erschießen. So eine Antwort kann nur von einem US-Amerikaner kommen. Uns kam es so vor, als wĂŒrden alle Amerikaner in Angst leben.

dscf2187

dscf2205
Nach Calgary ist es noch weit

Alaska: Where have all the bears gone?

1.389km und 8.858 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 9.753km und 58.032 Höhenmeter)
1,389km and 8,858 m altitude gain (9,753km and altitude gain of 58,032m in total)

27 April – 27 May, 2016 – Bridging the winter in Thailand hasn’t been our smartest idea ever. First, it was far too hot in Thailand to enjoy cycling and second, a 30-degree-temperature difference didn’t make our acclimatization much easier. We would feel cold for weeks. Thankfully we were warmly welcomed by the wonderful and a bit chaotic Lowe family in Anchorage who didn’t mind us staying longer than planned to get used to the time difference and the idea of cycling at for us still winter temperatures. We upgraded our gear, walked the dogs of our hosts, cycled around Anchorage, enjoyed yummy food and a different breakfast almost every day, ate Sushi with the lovely neighbors, were taken to the Exit Glacier and Steward, and participated in a bear awareness training. You would expect that one feels better prepared and less anxious after such a training. Failed! We now knew how to handle our bear spray, we knew we had to “stand the ground” if a bear would charge and that most charges were bluff charges and the bear turns away a meter before you. We even learned to fight back when a bear starts eating us or if a bear would attack our tent in the middle of the night. REALLY? We both were more afraid than ever of potential bear encounters and now felt like there was a bear behind every tree and after every corner of the road. However, it is still more likely for us to get hit by a car than charged by a bear. After 10 days we were finally ready to start pedaling – mentally as well as physically. Leaving was hard this time as we felt like losing our family – the downside of long-term travelers.

DSCF7721
Alaska seen from the aircraft
DSCF7772
A walk in the park
DSCF7789
Adding a bit more chaos to the kitchen
DSCF7792
Bear awareness training
DSCF7958
It’s Prom Day ❀
P1250697
Family picture 🙂
P1250739
A sleeping gentleman in front of the Sleeping Lady (name of the mountain in the background). She will only wake up when there is peace on earth everywhere! Thankfully Johan woke up earlier.
P1250743
The photographer in action
P1250746
FedEx Anchorage Hub
DSCF7988
Downtown Anchorage
P1250755
A walk to Exit Glacier
P1250757
In Seward with Merlin, Johan’s best friend
DSCF8269
❀ ❀ ❀
DSCF8412
Our little princess
DSCF8428
With Jim

DSCF8540

DSCF8575
Leaving Anchorage accompanied by Omi and Bernice

Cycling Alaska in early May means cycling pre-season and lots of campgrounds and other even more important facilities such as grocery shops along the way were still closed. We left Anchorage heavily overloaded as our new family was afraid we would starve on the way. We chose to cycle the George Parks Highway to Fairbanks and from there the Alaska Highway to Canada.

DSCF8588
Busy roads and rainy weather leaving Anchorage

Weather at this time of the year is very unstable with chilly temperatures, sometimes snow and lots of rain. Forecasts are useless as the weather changes so quickly that they are mostly unreliable. Luckily we found a few more hosts on our way so we could get some shelter from the rain and cold, the one or the other nice warm meal and the often desperately needed hot shower. Shortly after Anchorage we were able to stay with an older lady living on her own with 13 sled dogs in the middle of nowhere. Last year a huge fire destroyed the forest around her house together with her greenhouse and a shed. Thankfully her beautiful house overlooking the vastness of forests and mountains stayed untouched by the flames. Due to heavy rains we were able to stay another day at her little cabin next to the house and dogs, entertained her with our road stories, listened to her life stories. In return for her hospitality we cleaned her house and Johan became friends with her dogs and fed them as well as cleaned their area from poop.

P1250769
Johan feeding the dogs

P1250773

DSCF8601
My office for the day

DSCF8607

DSCF8626
Our little cabin for 2 days

We continued cycling through rolling hills and endless forests and enjoyed fantastic vistas of snow-capped mountains and a myriad of lakes, if rain allowed. We camped at an abandoned lodge, always afraid we would wake up with a gun pointed at us as we had trespassed private property. At Denali National Park I celebrated my birthday and we admired North America’s highest peak, this time at fantastic weather. James and Amanda, our hosts at Denali, invited us that evening for a yummy dinner followed by drinks at a nearby bar with live music.

DSCF8731
Resting in the sun after tough cycling through rain and headwinds
P1250783
Moose – we saw them almost every day in Alaska, beautiful and mighty animals
P1250809
Mystic Alaska

P1250797

DSCF9016
Birthday pie
P1250836
Can’t get any better
DSCF9328
With James

We still hadn’t spotted a single bear but instead moose and caribou. They would just graze next to the road and look curiously at us with their enormous heads. Strange enough we both are less afraid of these ungulates even though everyone keeps telling us that they are more dangerous than bears.

DSCF8842

DSCF8881
Caribou

In Fairbanks we had an encounter of a very different kind: we met the real Santa Claus. He lives in North Pole and happened to be the brother of my former work colleague and decided to change his name into Santa Claus. At Christmas time he makes a lot of children very happy with his personalized letters and presents.

DSCF9469
Pouring rain all day so we stopped at this ‘inviting’ bar for a hot drink
DSCF9389
Remember the movie ‘Into the wild’?
DSCF9387
Meeting other cyclists from France
DSCF8950
Upon arrival in North Pole…
DSCF9755
…we had the pleasure of meeting Santa Claus
DSCF9611
Downtown Fairbanks
DSCF9516
Back in time in our new vehicle
DSCF9746
With our lovely hosts Marilyn and Simon

This day would continue with more unexpected surprises: our Anchorage family came to visit us and we camped together with their two children, two dogs, a chicken and a bunny. The next day little Omi decided she wanted to continue with us and we loaded all our luggage into the motorhome and flew with the wind 165 km further to our next campground. In the meantime the Lowe’s collected a Japanese cyclist on the way and upon arrival they spoiled us with delicious dinner. That night five adults, two children, two big dogs, a chicken and a bunny slept in a 6-person-motorhome as thunderstorms passed through.

DSCF9822
Arriving late at Birch Lake and getting lots of treats that evening
P1250965
Camping with 2 dogs, a chicken and a bunny :-)…
P1250968
…and very entertaining Omi

 

P1250983
Meeting Hiroki from Japan for the first time

DSCF9926

After another wonderful breakfast the following morning including fruit salad, pancakes, sausages, juices, coffee, tea, eggs and many more delicacies we bid our final farewell and continued cycling towards Canada together with Hiroki.

One big family
We are family!

On the beautiful Alaska Highway

P1260029P1260020P1260015P1260010P1260001