Relaxing in Dushanbe

Fast facts Tajikistan:

  • A small landlocked jewel with huge and beautiful mountains, second only in height to the Himalaya/Karakoram range
  • Neighbouring countries: Kyrgyzstan (North), China (East), Afghanistan (South), Uzbekistan (West)
  • Population: 8.5 million people
  • Poorest country in Central Asia: a teacher earns approximately 80 USD per month and it is estimated that 20% of the population lives on less than 1.25 USD per day.
  • Drug trafficking is the major illegal income source

9 – 20 September 2015 – We’ve had a wonderful time in Dushanbe. Only then we realized how tired we were. Not only from a 24-hour drive heart-stoppingly close to cliffs but also from the hard work over the past few weeks. The coming days we did not set an alarm, we did not struggle against headwinds and instead just slept, read, ate, updated the blog, slept, strolled through the city, relaxed a bit more, applied for our Turkmen transit visas, slept again, met a few other cyclists and enjoyed the luxury of our guesthouse.

Marian's guesthouse in Dushanbe - our little paradise
Marian’s Guesthouse in Dushanbe – our little paradise
Finally meeting Phoebe who is cycling to Singapore. We met her brother a few years ago in Singapore and have been following Phoebe's travels since earlier this year.
Finally meeting Phoebe who is cycling to Singapore. We met her brother a few years ago in Singapore and have been following Phoebe’s travels since earlier this year.
The world seen from Dushanbe
The world seen from Dushanbe
Tajikistan's president - smiling at us from millions of billboards
Tajikistan’s president – looking at us from millions of billboards
One of Dushanbe's landmarks
One of Dushanbe’s landmarks

DSCF9779

And another monstrous building
And another monstrous building
Once Asia's largest flagpole, the flag alone measures 2000 square meters!
Once Asia’s largest flagpole, the flag alone measures 2000 square meters!

The day our visas should have been ready we nervously cycled to the embassy. We had heard too many stories of people getting rejected for no obvious reasons. We arrived at around 9am only to hear that they would only open by 9.30am. Finally inside we were told to come back the next day, the visas weren’t ready as yet. Now we were even more thankful that we had arrived on time in Dushanbe as the next day was Friday and Sunday was the day we had to leave Tajikistan. If we wouldn’t get the visas on Friday we would have to leave without. But lucky as we are the next day it was ready – we only had to cycle across the city through mad traffic to pay our 110 $ visa fee to a Pakistan Bank located at the other end of the city and pedal once more all the way back.

Two happy chaps
Two happy chaps with their Turkmenistan visas

Finally we were ready to hit the road again. The next morning the alarm went off early again but we couldn’t believe our eyes. It was raining! We haven’t seen any rain in weeks. The forecast was bad for the whole day and eventually we stayed another day. Good decision, the following day we set off on a clear and sunny day with slight tailwinds. Mostly we cycled along boring cotton fields, apple plantations and grapevines, with a barren mountain chain in the background. But after 12 days off the bikes we enjoyed sitting once again on our hard saddles. Halfway to the border we got a water melon and ate it together with the friendly and very well English-speaking people. Later that day I got fresh grapes and Johan a freshly baked bread. From everywhere we once more heard friendly ‘Hellos’ and ‘Salams’ and people kept asking us how we liked Tajikistan. We were no longer ‘normal’ tourists but cycling travellers attracting a lot of attention and causing much confusion. ‘Why do you cycle? Why not go by car? This is so much easier!’, were the questions and comments we got from locals. Only the poorest or kids are cycling in Tajikistan, everyone else rides a car.

Leaving Dushanbe in the early morning
Leaving Dushanbe in the early morning
The melon has already been eaten
The melon has already been eaten

 

 

 

 

 

Let the president always be with us
Let the president always be with us
TAILWIND!!!
TAILWIND!!!
Aluminium production - we are now part of an espionage plot, as the Uzbek customs officer asked us for a copy of this photo
Aluminium production – we are now part of an espionage plot, as the Uzbek customs officer asked us for a copy of this photo
At lunch time
At lunch time
Cotton fields
Cotton fields
Time for the cotton harvest
Time for the cotton harvest

We entered the country from a very poor area and cycled through one of the most remote regions. The climate is rough with hot and arid summers and very cold winters. People are shy but very friendly and hospitable. Food is basic with little variety. Soup is the staple dish and if we were lucky there were a few other vegetables than potatoes in it. With it we usually got stale bread and sweets. Sometimes fried potatoes or plov (fried rice with carrots and mutton meat) was served. If we were very lucky we got tomato and cucumber salad, most likely the cause for our constant stomach issues.

Bathrooms are basic and usually quite dirty. This surprised us as they are very tidy if it comes to their houses. You must not enter the house with shoes, that’s a major offence. Early in the morning they start sweeping the floors and it continues throughout the day, often to our annoyance as they cause more dust than anything else. Squat toilets are built as far away from the house as possible and shower facilities usually don’t work – there was either boiling hot or ice-cold water, nothing in between. Sometimes there would only be a few drops coming out of the tap. But then these were bathrooms built for tourists. Locals on the countryside only have toilets, washing takes place in front of their houses with water out of a tin pot or a bucket.

Tajiks are very bad drivers, same as everywhere else in Central Asia. Due to the condition of the roads, cars – the majority being old ladas from the Sovjet era – are in the same poor state. Tajiks only know one speed: fast. Wheels spin whenever they leave, they are overtaking everywhere whether they see something or not, they are always on the phone and we’ve hardly seen cars without broken windshields.

Landscapes were absolutely stunning and breathtaking most of the time. Being such a mountainous country it’s been the toughest cycling experience for us ever. Despite all the pain and effort we’ve been through we are very grateful that we made it through the Pamirs in one piece and that we were able to explore these extraordinary landscapes.

Ausspannen in Dushanbe

Fakten Tadschikistan:

  • Ein kleiner, von Land umgebener Juwel mit atemberaubenden Bergen, die höchsten nach dem Himalaja/Karakorum
  • Nachbarländer: Kirgisistan (Norden), China (Osten), Afghanistan (Süden), Usbekistan (Westen)
  • Bevölkerung: 8,5 Millionen
  • Das ärmste Land Zentralasiens: ein Lehrer verdient ungefähr 80 USD im Monat und Schätzungen gehen davon aus, dass 20% der Bevölkerung mit weniger als 1,25 USD auskommen muss
  • Drogenhandel ist die größte illegale Einkommensquelle

9. – 20. September 2015 – Wir hatten eine sehr schöne Zeit in Dushanbe. Erst hier fiel uns auf, wie müde wir waren. Nicht nur von einer abenteuerlichen 24-Stunden-Fahrt am Rande des Abgrunds, sondern vor allem von der harten Arbeit der letzten Wochen. Jetzt stellten wir uns endlich keinen Wecker mehr, mussten nicht gegen den Wind ankämpfen, dagegen schliefen wir viel, lasen, aßen, aktualisierten den Blog, schliefen, ich arbeitete, wir liefen durch die Stadt, entspannten uns ein bisschen mehr, kümmerten uns um unsere Turkmenistan Visa, schliefen ein bisschen mehr, trafen andere Radfahrer und genossen den Luxus unseres Gasthauses.

Finally meeting Phoebe who is cycling to Singapore. We met her brother a few years ago in Singapore and have been following Phoebe's travels since earlier this year.
Endlich treffen wir Phoebe, die nach Singapur radelt. Vor ein Paar Jahren haben wir ihren Bruder in Singapur getroffen und verfolgen Phoebes Reisen virtuell seit einigen Monaten.
The world seen from Dushanbe
Die Welt aus der Sicht von Dushanbe
Tajikistan's president - smiling at us from millions of billboards
Tadschikistans Präsident, der auf uns von Millionen Plakaten herunterschaut
One of Dushanbe's landmarks
Eines der Wahrzeichen von Dushanbe

DSCF9779

And another monstrous building
Und noch ein monströses Gebäude
Once Asia's largest flagpole, the flag alone measures 2000 square meters!
Einst Asiens größter Fahnenmast – die Flagge allein hat eine Fläche von 2000 Quadratmetern!
An enormous tea house
Alles ist hier groß – hier ein enormes Teehaus

Am Tag, als unsere Visa fertig sein sollten, radelten wir nervös zur Botschaft. Wir haben so viele Geschichten von Menschen gehört, denen das Visum grundlos verweigert wurde. Wir kamen um 9 Uhr wie vereinbart an, die Botschaft machte aber erst um 9.30 Uhr auf. Nachdem wir dann endlich rein durften mussten wir leider erfahren, dass unsere Visa noch nicht fertig waren. Jetzt waren wir erst recht froh, dass wir so rechtzeitig nach Dushanbe gereist sind, denn der nächste Tag war Freitag und am Sonntag mussten wir das Land verlassen. Wenn wir morgen das Visum nicht bekämen, müssten wir ohne ausreisen. Aber wir hatten wieder einmal Glück, am nächsten Tag waren die Visa fertig, wir mussten nur noch quer durch die ganze Stadt und wahnsinnigen Verkehr radeln, um die Visagebühr von 110 $ bei der Pakistan Bank zu bezahlen und dann wieder zurückradeln, um unsere Pässe mit neuem Aufkleber abzuholen.

Two happy chaps
Zwei Glückspilze mit ihren Turkmenistan Visa

Jetzt konnten wir endlich wieder weiterradeln. Am nächsten Morgen klingelte der Wecker wieder früh und wir trauten unseren Augen nicht: Es regnete! Wochenlang hatte es nicht geregnet. Die Vorhersage war für den ganzen Tag schlecht und letztendlich blieben wir noch einen Tag länger. Das war eine gute Entscheidung, denn am nächsten Tag fuhren wir bei Sonnenschein und leichtem Rückenwind los. Die Strecke war langweilig, meist fuhren wir an Baumwoll- und Obstplantagen mit Äpfelbäumen und Traubenstöcken vorbei und einer kahlen Bergkette im Hintergrund. Das machte aber nichts, nach zwölf radlosen Tagen waren wir froh, wieder auf unseren harten Sätteln sitzen zu dürfen. Auf halbem Weg zur Grenze bekamen wir eine Melone geschenkt, die wir gemeinsam mit den netten und sehr gut Englisch sprechenden Menschen aßen. Später bekamen wir noch leckere Trauben frisch gepflückt und ein warmes Brot aus dem Backofen geschenkt. Von überall her hörten wir wieder “Hello” und “Salam” und die Menschen fragten uns, ob es uns denn in Tadschikistan gefiele. Jetzt waren wir nicht mehr länger ‘normale’ Touristen, sondern radelnde Reisende, die viel Aufmerksamkeit auf sich ziehen und oft für Verwirrung sorgen. ‘Warum fahrt ihr mit dem Fahrrad? Warum nicht mit dem Auto? Das ist doch viel einfacher!’ hörten wir immer wieder von den Ortsansässigen. Hier radeln nur die Ärmsten oder Kinder, alle anderen fahren Auto.

Leaving Dushanbe in the early morning
Auf dem Weg nach Usbekistan, Stadtausgang Dushanbe
The melon has already been eaten
Die Melone ist bereits aufgegessen

 

 

 

 

 

Let the president always be with us
Auf dass der Präsident immer bei uns sei!
TAILWIND!!!
RÜCKENWIND!!!
Aluminium production - we are now part of an espionage plot, as the Uzbek customs officer asked us for a copy of this photo
Aluminiumfabrik – wir sind nun Teil eines Spionagekomplotts – der usbekische Grenzbeamte hat uns um eine Kopie dieses Fotos gebeten.
At lunch time
Mittagessenszeit
Cotton fields
Baumwollfelder
Time for the cotton harvest
Baumwollernte

Wir sind in das Land von seiner ärmsten Seite eingereist und fuhren durch eine der abgelegensten Gebiete. Das Klima ist hart mit heißen und trockenen Sommern und sehr kalten Wintern. Die Menschen sind scheu, aber sehr nett und gastfreundlich. Das Essen ist sehr einfach und bietet wenig Variationen. Suppe ist DAS Gericht und wenn wir Glück hatten, dann gab es außer Kartoffeln noch anderes Gemüse in der Suppe. Oft aßen wir dazu altes Brot und Süßigkeiten. Manchmal gab es Bratkartoffeln oder Plov (gebratener Reis mit Karotten und etwas Hammelfleisch). Und wenn wir ganz besonderes Glück hatten, gab es Tomaten- und Gurkensalat, der war wahrscheinlich immer der Grund für unsere ständigen Magen- und Darmprobleme.

Die Bäder sind hier ebenfalls sehr spartanisch und oft leider auch sehr dreckig. Letzteres ist überraschend, denn die Häuser sind extrem sauber. Auf keinen Fall dürfen sie mit Schuhen betreten werden, das kommt einem schweren Verbrechen gleich. Schon früh morgens wird mit dem Fegen begonnen, dann werden die Böden genässt und gewischt und dann wird wieder gefegt. Die Stehklos sind immer so weit wie möglich weg vom Haus und die Duschen funktionieren in der Regel nicht, wenn es denn welche gibt. Entweder kommen aus dem Hahn nur ein Paar Tropfen oder kochendheißes oder eiskaltes Wasser, dazwischen gibt es nichts. Aber dann muss man auch wissen, dass diese Bäder auch nur für Touristen gebaut werden, die Menschen hier auf dem Land haben keine Badezimmer, sie waschen sich an einem einfach Waschbecken vor dem Haus. Manchmal gibt es noch nicht einmal ein Waschbecken und man gießt sich das Wasser mit einer Zinnkanne über die Hände und den Rest.

Die Tadschiken sind sehr schlechte Autofahrer, wie übrigens überall sonst in Zentralasien auch. Aufgrund des schlechten Zustands der Straßen sehen Autos nicht viel besser aus – meist sind es hier alte Ladas noch aus Sowietzeiten. Tadschiken können auch nur schnell fahren. Die Reifen quietschen, wenn sie losfahren, sie überholen, ob sie etwas sehen oder nicht, sie telefonieren fast ununterbrochen während der Fahrt und wir haben fast keine Autos ohne Risse in der Windschutzscheibe gesehen.

Die Landschaften waren außergewöhnlich und fast immer atemberaubend. Aufgrund der vielen und hohen Berge war es für uns wohl schwierigste Land zum Radeln. Trotz aller Schmerzen und Anstrengungen durch dieses Land, sind wir froh, dass wir es heil durch den Pamir und das Wakhan-Tal geschafft haben und dass wir die Möglichkeit hatten, diese außergewöhnlichen Landschaften zu erkunden.

The Infamous Pamir Highway – Part 4

23 August – 8 September, 2015 – As the Pamir Highway has been an important milestone of our journey you’ll find below our diary entries with the highlights of every day presented in four parts.

Bildschirmfoto 2015-09-17 um 15.49.16

Day 16 and 17: Ishkashim – Dushanbe: 700km
With Johan still being weak and us having to be in Dushanbe for our Turkmenistan visa application we take a taxi already from Ishkashim and not from Khorog as originally planned. The guesthouse manager is able to negotiate a good deal with a taxi driver and we head off with our bikes on top of the car and the trunk stuffed with our many panniers. 10 minutes later we pick up an Afghan police officer who also has to go Dushanbe – there it goes our private taxi. Annoyed and a few phone calls later we negotiate another discount as our private taxi has become a shared taxi. Unfortunately our macho driver thinks he owns the road and we think he might have obtained his driver’s licence in India as most of the time he is driving on the left handside. Much to our annoyance, as the left is the cliff with the river a few hundred meters below. The bone-crunching road that has in the meantime rejoined the Pamir Highway continues twisting through canyons and gorges with barren mountains raising to the left and right. At the other side of the river still lies Afghanistan and a small donkey track winds along the river. The vistas are spectacular and we both are saddened that we aren’t able to cycle this part of the Pamir Highway. We also regret that we’ve relied on our travel guide’s advice to make a detour through the Wakhan Valley as we are now on the most spectacular part of the highway. Every once in a while Johan advises the driver to slow down, to drive on the right handside of the road and not to pass trucks on a one-way-track while we cannot see anything due to the dust raised by the vehicle in front of us. At nightfall we even get more scared as the road is worsening, the visibility is low and the driver seems to be more interested in the many phone calls that keep coming in until as late as 2am than paying attention to the road. Poor Johan stays awake all night, once avoiding a collision with a pile of sand and constantly arguing with the driver to make sure we’ll arrive safely. The next morning – on a finally paved highway – the driver once more needs to demonstrate his skills: at a horrendous speed of 140 km/h and a car that’s almost falling apart I tell him off and stubborn as he is he continues at 60 km/h asking every few seconds if he is still going too fast. The atmosphere in the car climaxes when we arrive in Dushanbe and Johan tries to guide our driver to our chosen guesthouse, but he just doesn’t want to follow Johan’s instructions – while not even knowing where to go. Listening to the driver’s behavior in silence for a while and us standing at a crossing and the driver not wanting to turn left as needed I burst out and yell at him to do what Johan is telling him, adding some abusive language in German and we finally arrive after 24 sleepless hours. During this far too exciting journey we pass about 20 military and police check points, each time showing our passports and each time having long discussions because of the Afghan in a car with European tourists. Later we learn that there had been a clash with several fatalities a few days ago in Dushanbe.

Getting the car packed for a long journey
Getting the car packed for a long journey

Johan negotiates a fantastic deal at Marian’s Guesthouse where we will relax until we have our visas for Turkmenistan. Today also happens to be the day the Australian football team plays against Tajikistan to qualify for the 2018 World Championship. Lucky as we are we chose to stay at an Australian-run guesthouse with a few Australian fans. Not only do we have a great deal with Marian for our stay in Dushanbe, she also offers us tickets for the game. We have a fantastic evening (and a few more later on) supporting the Australian team with our new Aussie friends and even I enjoy the atmosphere in the stadium while not being a football enthusiast at all.

Life treats us well again!

Highly secured stadium
Highly secured stadium

P1220986

P1220987

Our new Aussie friends
Our new Aussie friends

P1230077

A peaceful audience
A peaceful audience

Der berühmt-berüchtigte Pamir-Highway – Teil 4

3. August – 8. September 2015 – Der Pamir Highway ist eines der Highlights unserer Reise, daher berichten wir über die wichtigsten Geschehnisse in insgesamt vier Teilen anhand unserer täglichen Tagebucheinträge.

Bildschirmfoto 2015-09-17 um 15.49.16

Tage 16 und 17: Ishkashim – Dushanbe: 700km
Johan fühlt sich noch immer schlecht und da wir rechtzeitig in Dushanbe für die Beantragung unserer Turmenistan-Visa sein müssen, nehmen wir bereits ab Ishkashim und nicht erst ab Khorog ein Taxi. Der Gasthaus-Besitzer verhandelt einen guten Deal für ein privates Taxi und mit den Rädern auf dem Dach und unseren Taschen im Kofferraum fahren wir los. Keine zehn Minuten später hält der Taxifahrer, um einen afghanischen Polizisten, der ebenfalls nach Dushanbe muss, mitzunehmen. Soviel zu privatem Taxi! Genervt telefonieren wir mit dem Manager des Gasthauses und handeln zumindest einen Rabatt raus. Leider fährt unser Macho-Taxifahrer wie ein Wilder und denkt, die Straße gehöre ihm alleine. Wir glauben, er hat seinen Führerschein in Indien gemacht, da er meist auf der linken Straßenseite fährt. Was uns noch mehr aufregt, da links die Klippe ist und mehrere hundert Meter unter uns der Fluss. Die halsbrecherische Straße, mittlerweile wieder mit dem Pamir Highway vereint, windet sich durch Schluchten und Canyons mit kahlen Bergen, die links und rechts in die Höhe sprießen. Auf der anderen Seite des Flusses liegt noch immer Afghanistan und dort führt ein schmaler Eselspfad am Fluss entlang. Die Aussichten sind spektakulär und wir sind beide traurig, dass wir diese Strecke nicht radeln können. Wir bedauern auch, dass wir uns auf unseren Reiseführer verlassen haben und durch das Wakhan-Tal geradelt sind, da wir uns jetzt erst auf dem spektakulärsten Teil des Highways befinden. Immer wieder weist Johan den Fahrer zurecht langsamer zu fahren, auf der rechten Seite der Straße zu fahren und LKWs auf der einspurigen Straße nicht zu überholen, wenn vor lauter Staub nichts zu sehen ist. In der Nacht wird die Fahrt noch gruseliger, da sich die Straße weiter verschlechtert, die Sicht schlecht ist und der Fahrer mehr an den vielen Telefonanrufen interessiert, die bis spät in die Nacht reinkommen, als an der Straße. Armer Johan bleibt die ganze Nacht wach, damit wir sicher ankommen, streitet unnachgiebig mit dem Fahrer und verhindert sogar ein Auffahren auf einen Sandhaufen am Straßenrand. Am nächsten Morgen als wir endlich auf einer geteerten Straße fahren muss der Fahrer wieder sein Können unter Beweis stellen. Mit einer für uns horrenden Geschwindigkeit von 140 km/h und einem Auto, das dabei fast auseinander fällt, brülle ich ihn dieses Mal an, damit er langsamer fährt. Stur fährt er die nächsten Minuten mit 60 km/h weiter und fragt andauernd, ob es so nun Recht sei. Die Stimmung im Auto erreicht in Dushanbe ihren Höhepunkt, als Johan freundlich versucht, unserem Fahrer den Weg zu unserem B&B anzuweisen und er partout den Anweisungen nicht folgen will, obwohl er keine Ahnung hat, wohin wir fahren müssen. Ich koche mittlerweile innerlich und an einer Kreuzung, an der er wieder mal nicht abbiegen will, brülle ich erneut und schicke noch ein Paar deutsche Schimpfwörter hinterher. Fünf Minuten später kommen wir dann nach 24 Stunden Autofahrt endlich an. Während dieser viel zu nervenaufreibenden Fahrt passieren wir übrigens ungefähr 20 Militär- und Polizei-Checkpoints. Jedes Mal müssen wir unsere Pässe zeigen und jedes Mal gibt es Theater, weil ein Afghane mit zwei Touristen reist. Später erfahren wir, dass es nur wenige Tage zuvor in einem Vorort von Dushanbe einen Anschlag mit mehreren Toten gab.

Getting the car packed for a long journey
Autopacken für eine lange Reise

In Marian’s Guesthouse verhandelt Johan einen fantastischen Preis und wir können uns so richtig erholen, bis wir unsere Visa für Turkmenistan bekommen. Heute findet zufällig auch das Fußball-Qualifikationsspiel für die WM 2018 zwischen Australien und Tadschikistan statt. Und da die Besitzerin des B&Bs Australierin ist, bekommen wir gleich zwei Karten geschenkt. Wir verbringen einen super Abend mit netten Australiern und selbst mir gefällt die Atmosphäre im Fußballstadion, obwohl ich so gar kein Fußballfan bin.

Das Leben meint es wieder gut mit uns!

Highly secured stadium
Hochsicherheits-Stadion

P1220986

P1220987

Our new Aussie friends
Unsere neuen australischen Freunde

P1230077

A peaceful audience
Friedvolle Zuschauer

The Infamous Pamir Highway – Part 3

23 August – 8 September, 2015 – As the Pamir Highway has been an important milestone of our journey you’ll find below our diary entries with the highlights of every day presented in four parts.

253km, altitude gain of 2,493 m (1,558km und Attitüde gain of 18.991 in total)
253km, altitude gain of 2,493 m (1,558km and altitude gain of 18.991 in total)

Day 10: Murghab – Alichor: 107km, altitude gain 841m
Early start and fantastic weather: no wind and another day with clear-blue sky. Shortly after Murghab we pass our first military checkpoint. We are now cycling through the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region for which a permit is needed. Our passports are thoroughly checked, details entered into a journal and ten minutes later we continue. We pedal up our first pass of today of 3600m, a piece of cake as we start climbing at 3500m. The coming hours the road is undulating uphill through a valley, we cycle through small canyons and to our left and right are red rocky mountains. Again hardly any vegetation, only a few thistles, succulents and grasses line the road. After the second pass of over 4100m the landscape becomes boring with a wide valley and brownish mountains around us. We feel a bit like in the movie ‘Groundhog Day’ as the road follows the same pattern over and over again: uphill, then left and downhill, another right turn and then uphill again. Despite the headwind as of 3pm we make good progress and end up at another homestay where we wash ourselves in the same room where we eat and sleep. We get two buckets, one filled with warm water. Our room also seems to be the only room where the phones can be charged and while Johan is standing naked in one of the buckets one after the other person tries to come in to check the status of the phones – of course without knocking on the door first. To avoid any embarrassments we watch the door until we are finished washing. The phone checking continues later on while we are trying to sleep. That evening we have a good laugh as we imagine all these interesting features of Tajik homestays to be added to our own B&B upon our return.

Leaving Murghab
Leaving Murghab
Right before the first pass at 3,600m
Right before the first pass at 3,600m

P1220864

DSCF9160

Another break with instant noodles and cookies for lunch
Another break with instant noodles and cookies for lunch
Two very funny and inspiring guys from England and Poland
Two very funny and inspiring guys from England and the Netherlands
'Fantastic' roads - at least hazards are marked
‘Fantastic’ roads – at least hazards are marked

Day 11: Alichor – Kharghush Pass: 62 km, altitude gain 773m
25 km asphalt and then we leave the Pamir Highway to cycle a loop through the Wakhan valley along the border of Afghanistan, only separated by the river Pamir. Other cyclists told us not to be worried about the Taliban as they can’t swim. So we don’t worry. We first cycle on a pretty bad road through sand, over rocks, up and down and up again, along a few salt lakes until we finally reach the pass. With a strong headwind and steep gradients we often have to push our bikes – now we know why they are called push bikes! After the summit the weather doesn’t really improve but we move on to find a camp spot at lower altitude. We pass another military checkpoint – this time with armed soldiers who are first asking for cigarettes and then for earphones – we pitch our tent with a vista of Afghanistan and the Pamir River. Traffic is almost non-existing:  today we meet 5 French cyclists and 3 cars pass by.

One of the many salt lakes that follow
One of the many salt lakes that follow
The beginning of the end of asphalt
The beginning of the end of asphalt
Struggling through sand
Struggling through sand
Another loner in the vastness of this beautiful scenery
Another loner in the vastness of this beautiful landscape
At the top of the second pass - the snow-capped mountain belongs to the Afghan Hindukush
At the top of the second pass – the snow-capped mountains belong to the Afghan Hindukush
Protection from the cold wind
Protection from the cold wind
Finally arrived after a long and tiresome day - Afghanistan in the background
Finally arrived after a long and tiresome day – Afghanistan in the background

Day 12: Kharghush to the middle of nowhere: 22km, altitude gain 152m
A day we don’t want to remember. Extremely strong headwind and a maddening bad road prevents us from making any progress. At 3pm we have a huge argument: Johan wants to continue for about 9km – the last hour we only cycled 3km – and I want to stop as we’ve been cycling to the limit for the past days. Shortly afterwards we find the perfect spot for our camp next to a river and hidden under trees. At night Johan wakes up with a start as he dreamed that the Taliban were trying to kidnap us and I wake up because I hear strange noises. For the rest of the night Johan keeps his knife in his hand to protect us from the evil. Today we meet one Dutch cyclist and two cars are passing by.

Tough cycling on rough roads
Tough cycling on rough roads

P1220883

It's been a tough day
It’s been a day…
But the beauty of the natures keeps us going
…but the beauty of the nature keeps us going

P1220888

"To my left is Afghanistan"
“To my left is Afghanistan”
Our hidden camp
Our hidden camp

Day 13: Middle of nowhere to Langar: 44km, altitude gain 396m
We are descending from 3600m to 2800m and are still climbing almost 400m! Does that make any sense? We keep meeting cyclists who tell us we would only descend as from now and they lied! We promise each other to tell the next cyclist that they would soon cycle on tarmac again and that the next pass is a piece of cake! Other than that the day is great, well rested legs, no wind all morning and scenic surroundings, looking all day at the infamous mountain range Hindukush and the roaring turquoise river Pamir – at least when the road allows. In the evening we check-in at a homestay with a perfect German-speaking landlady. A film crew from the German TV station mdr shooting a mountaineering documentary has checked in as well and we spend a nice evening chatting with them. Today it’s been busy on the road: 2 French and 2 Swiss cyclists, 7 cars and 3 trucks full of workers at the back.

Rolling landscape with a Hindukush backdrop
Rolling landscape with a Hindukush backdrop

DSCF9429

Roads looking scarier on the photo than in reality
Roads looking scarier on the photo than in reality
Can you find the little cyclist?
Can you find the little cyclist?
The mightiness of the mountains
The mightiness of the mountains

P1220910

A few more hills and we're in Langar
A few more hills and we’re in Langar
We finally made it!
We finally made it – and yes, there are still trees on this planet 😉
Our nice homestay
Our nice homestay

Day 14: Langar – Ptup, 46km, altitude gain 350m
Late start and never-ending bad roads. Whoever told us that the roads would become better after Langar is a liar. Either we go through sand, over huge rocks, washboard or 20cm deep gravel. And yes, there is some asphalt as well, but that is melting, so once again no pleasure to ride on. By the evening our bottoms are sore and hours later we are still shaky from the bumpy roads. But enough ranting. The landscape has changed a lot. We are now at the wide river Panj, again marking the border between Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The valley is semi-arid and apart from occasional clusters of shrubs or willow, birch and other small trees the landscape remains barren. The villages that emerge every few kilometers seem like small oases to us with all the trees, fields and vegetable gardens we haven’t seen since Osh two weeks ago. Between two villages we see about 10 to 15 men far away at the river, a rubber boat trying to get to the Tajikistan shore and five big 4WD cars waiting next to the road. My first thought is that they are fishing, but Johan’s got a better idea: the men are smuggling drugs from Afghanistan to Tajikistan. It is estimated that as much as 50% of Tajikistan’s economic activity in the last decade was linked to Afghanistan’s narcotic trade. We try to get away from there as quickly as the road allows. Today we meet a group of supported German cyclists, 1 truck and about 20 – 30 cars.

Another shop with extraordinary choice: 10 different types of cookies and candies, 100 packages instant noodle soup, Vodka and cigarettes
Another shop with an extraordinary choice: 10 different types of cookies and candies, 100 packages of instant noodle soup, Vodka and cigarettes
Field work
Field work
Cycling through another oasis
Cycling through another oasis
Resting from too much field work
Resting from too much field work
Another majestic mountain
Another majestic mountain

DSCF9563

P1220930

"Sending my love to everyone out there"
“Sending my love to everyone out there”
Just in case you were thinking we are exaggerating about the roads...
Just in case you were thinking we are exaggerating about the roads…
Washing dirty laundry
Washing dirty laundry

DSCF9600

And here is the evidence: smugglers!
And here is the evidence: smugglers!
At the end of another exhausting day we got served fried potatoes swimming in oil with old bread and cucumber salad, cookies and tea.
At the end of another exhausting day we get served fried potatoes swimming in oil with old bread and cucumber salad, cookies and tea.

Day 15: Ptup – Ishkashim: 18km, altitude gain 341m
Another day we’d rather forget. We leave with Johan having severe stomach cramps on a sunny and stormy day. Guess what – we are cycling into the wind. Four hours later we are just 18km further, having pushed our bikes up most of the time due to the storm. Johan marks the road as I did a few days ago. We hire a taxi to Ishkashim as we know we won’t make it by bike, given the weather and road circumstances.

Village life on an early Sunday morning
Village life on an early Sunday morning
Today's vista of Afghanistan
Today’s vista of Afghanistan
Today's state of the road
Today’s state of the road: pebbles, …
...and sand. And have a look at our flags, sigh!
…and sand. And have a look at our flags, sigh!
No, I am not having a good time today
No, I am not having a good time today
Push, push, push...
Push, push, push…

The Infamous Pamir Highway – Part 2

23 August – 8 September, 2015 – As the Pamir Highway has been an important milestone of our journey you’ll find below our diary entries with the highlights of every day presented in four parts.

137km, 1047 meters altitude gain (1258km and 16,155 m altitude gain in total)
137km, 1047 meters altitude gain (1258km and 16,155 m altitude gain in total)

Day 6: Karakul – bottom of pass Akbaital: 48km, altitude gain 503m
A late start and a tremendous headwind prevents us from making any progress. We meet two Austrian cyclists and Eddy (not Merckx) from Belgium who are today’s lucky ones. We get updates on the road and continue. Extreme washboard after 40km doesn’t help us and I get weaker and weaker and even start walking at times as it is easier than cycling against this wind. Right before the pass we see a farmer’s camp and decide to call it a day. Johan and I agree to pitch the tent and cook ourselves and five minutes later Johan ‘books’ us into the hut including half-board for around 7 EUR. At first happy to be be done for the day, we would soon regret it. The people are very hospitable, prepare chai for us which is served with bread, kefir and butter. We relax in the overheated hut at temperatures of around 30 degrees but almost suffocate from the exhaust of the little oven used for cooking and heating. We can’t wash ourselves so we endure and soon dinner is served. Again chai and bread and a kind of ravioli filled with meat and onions. A tasty but greasy dish. Right after dinner our bed is being prepared next to the dining table. The 10-year-old daughter lays out many thick blankets and pillows on the floor and indicates that we now can go to sleep. The whole family is still sitting around the table eating and drinking and we feel a bit odd to go to bed, especially as we are still dressed in our cycling clothes and not keen on keeping them on all night. Not being able to wash has already been hard enough. We are being told another time to go to sleep and we finally obey. With low voices the family continues eating and firing the heating. After dinner the father lits a few cigarettes, farts with Johan laying right next to him and us almost dying with all our clothes on under two heavy blankets. About a sleepless hour later the family starts making their own sleeping arrangements, now stumbling over us as their bedding is right behind us. Finally ready, the daughter begins to talk endlessly for at least another hour, us still fully awake, but in the meantime secretly undressed under our blankets. No way I could sleep in my sports bra and cycling shorts as our clothes pannier stands on the other side of the hut. Now I am only wearing my sweaty tee. Johan had been smart enough to bring his pyjama with him. My challenge now is to keep my naked bottom under the blanket and to get dressed on time the next morning. When the talking finally stops we hear another strange noise – the girl is peeing into a bowl right next to the beds. This procedure is being repeated several times and in the morning we get up more shattered than the evening before. An altitude of 4100m and my beginning stomach problems most likely didn’t really help either.

Our nice little homestay
Our nice little homestay

Leaving Sary Tash

Leaving Sary Tash
Leaving Sary Tash
Lake Karakul
Lake Karakul
Eddy from Belgium
Eddy from Belgium

Day 7: Pass Akbaital – Murghab: 89km, altitude gain 544m
Today we would traverse our highest pass ever at an altitude of 4655m. As we leave early we start cycling without any wind. I feel very bad with stomach cramps and have to relieve myself right before the pass for the first time. The climb is very difficult with very steep gradients and we walk several times. The altitude adds to the difficulty and we often only manage to cycle 50m before we rest again. The landscape is surreal, red mountains that change colours with the light, hardly any vegetation and besides the funny whistles from the marmots that curiously watch us an eerie silence. After 12.5 km we happily reach the summit and as from now it would only go down – altitude and health-wise. I start feeling like a dog as I leave a mark every few kilometers. After lunch we have our first strange encounter. About 500m ahead I see people standing on the road, there is nothing else close-by and I get a little worried not knowing what to expect. We both take out our pepper spray and cycle next to each other. Only a maximum of 10 to 20 cars are passing us each day and we know we are on our own. Getting closer we recognize two soldiers armed with machine guns standing and another man sitting on the road. As we approach, the sitting man gets up to let us pass. Johan greets ‚Salam’, they are all greeting back and we are gone with the wind.  At around 3pm the wind picks up again and again it is headwind. I am very exhausted as my diarrhoea is getting worse by the minute and knowing I still have to cycle at least 10km against the strong wind makes me break down for the first time on this trip. I can’t stop crying not knowing how to get to the next village. Johan tries to comfort me and we continue slowly with me cycling in his slipstream. When we finally see the village after the last bend in a valley tears keep running again. This time they are tears of joy. We are nearly there. This night I spend mostly on the loo – another sleepless night!

Leaving our camp early in the morning
Leaving our camp early in the morning
Washboard!
Washboard!
First toilet break
First toilet break
Ascending the highest pass
Ascending the highest pass
Confident to be able to make it
Confident to be able to make it
Ha - we made it...
Ha – we made it…
...but we definitely didn't fly
…but we definitely didn’t fly
The beginning of a very long downhill
The beginning of a very long downhill
Sand storms
Sand storms
This was more or less the population between the pass and Murghab
This was more or less the population between the pass and Murghab
Happily arrived in Murghab
Happily arrived in Murghab

Days 8 and 9: Murghab
Long cycling days, food I should not have eaten, maybe contaminated water, headwinds, sleepless nights due to the altitude, the most demanding cycling ever on bad roads and a heavy bike had taken its toll. I am down with fever and the worst diarrhoea ever and we need to take two days off of cycling. My symptoms correspond with the traveller’s diarrhoea and I start taking antibiotics which make me feel much better the second day and confident to be able to continue our journey tomorrow.

A typical townhouse in the Pamirs
A typical townhouse in the Pamirs
The desolate township of Murghab
The desolate township of Murghab
Lenin welcomes us in the smallest village
Lenin welcomes us in the smallest village
Market time
Market time

Der berühmt-berüchtigte Pamir Highway – Teil 2

23. August – 8. September 2015 – Der Pamir Highway ist eines der Highlights unserer Reise, daher berichten wir über die wichtigsten Geschehnisse in insgesamt vier Teilen anhand unserer täglichen Tagebucheinträge.

137km, 1047 meters altitude gain (1258km and 16,155 m altitude gain in total)
137km, 1.047 Höhenmeter (1.258km und 16,155 Höhenmeter insgesamt)

Tag 6: Karakul – Fuß des Passes Akbaital: 48km, 503 Höhenmeter
Wir kommen heute kaum voran, wir sind spät losgefahren und der Wind bläst gnadenlos in unser Gesicht. Wir treffen zwei österreichische Radler und Eddy (nicht Merckx) aus Belgien, die heute Glück haben, erkundigen uns über die bevorstehende Strecke und weiter geht es. Nach 40km gesellt sich zum Wind auch noch extremes Waschbrett und ich werde vor Anstrengung immer schwächer und schiebe immer öfter mein Rad, da ich so bei diesem Gegenwind und Straßenbelag deutlich schneller vorankomme. Kurz vor dem Pass sehen wir ein Camp und beschließen, dort zu bleiben. Bevor wir bei den Bauern anfragen klären wir ab, dass wir unser eigenes Zelt aufbauen und selber kochen. Fünf Minuten später hat uns Johan für knapp sieben Euro ein Bett in der Hütte ‘gebucht’ einschließlich Halbpension. Zunächst sind wir froh, da wir uns für den restlichen Tag viel Arbeit sparen, bereuen dies aber recht schnell. Die Menschen sind sehr gastfreundlich, wir bekommen Tee, Brot Kefir und Butter. In der total überheizten Hütte ruhen wir uns bei Temperaturen von ca. 30 Grad ein bisschen aus, ersticken aber beinahe, da der kleine Ofen, der zum Kochen und Heizen genutzt wird, viel zu viel Rauch in die Hütte bläst. Wir können uns nicht waschen und so halten wir bis zum Abendessen durch. Es gibt wieder Tee und Brot und so etwas wie Ravioli mit Fleisch- und Zwiebelfüllung. Schmeckt lecker, ist aber viel zu fett. Nach dem Essen fängt die zehnjährige Tochter an, unser Bett vorzubereiten. Dazu legt sie dicke Decken und Kissen auf dem Boden aus und deutet an, dass wir uns nun schlafen legen könnten. Da der Rest der Familie noch um den Tisch herum sitzt und isst und wir noch immer in unseren Radklamotten vor uns hinmüffeln, bleiben wir erst einmal sitzen. Außerdem würden wir uns ja zumindest gerne unsere Schlafanzüge anziehen, wenn wir uns schon nicht waschen können. Nach der zweiten Aufforderung, uns doch jetzt schlafen zu legen, gehorchen wir. Flüsternd fährt die Familie mit ihrem Abendessen fort und feuert immer wieder die Heizung. Nach dem Essen lässt das Oberhaupt der Familie direkt neben Johan einige Fürze fahren, raucht zwei Zigaretten während wir fast eingehen unter den schweren Decken und mit all unseren Kleidern am Körper.  Ungefähr eine uns endlos vorkommende Stunde später, in der wir natürlich kein Auge zugetan haben, beginnt die Familie mit den eigenen Schlafens-Arrangements. Dazu müssen weitere Decken ausgelegt werden, die direkt hinter uns gestapelt sind und so stolpert das Mädchen für die nächsten 10 Minuten andauern über uns. Nachdem sie endlich fertig sind und alle liegen, beginnt das Mädchen endlos zu reden. Wir sind natürlich immer noch hellwach, mittlerweile haben wir uns jedoch heimlich ausgezogen. Beim besten Willen konnte ich mir nicht vorstellen, eine Nacht in Sport-BH und Radhose zu verbringen. Johan war so schlau, und hat sich seinen Schlafanzug mitgenommen, ich hatte leider nur mein verschwitztes T-Shirt, unsere Kleidertasche stand am anderen Ende der Hütte für uns unerreichbar. Jetzt lag ich vor der Herausforderung, meinen nackten Hintern unter der dicken Decke bei weiterhin 30 Grad in der Hütte zu verstecken und mich am nächsten Morgen rechtzeitig bevor die Familie wach wird, anzuziehen. Nachdem es dann endlich still wird hören wir ein weiteres seltsames Geräusch: das Mädchen ist wieder aufgestanden, um in eine Schüssel zu pinkeln. Dieser Vorgang wiederholt sich dann mehrfach in der Nacht und am Morgen wachen wir müder auf als am Tag zuvor. Die Höhe von 4.100m und meine sich ankündigenden Magenprobleme haben zu dieser schlechten Nacht wohl auch noch beigetragen.

Our nice little homestay
Homestay am Karakul-See

Leaving Sary Tash

Leaving Sary Tash
Wir verlassen Sary Tash
Lake Karakul
Am See Karakul
Eddy from Belgium
Eddy aus Belgien

Tag 7: Pass Akbaital – Murghab: 89km, 544 Höhenmeter
Heute überqueren wir unseren höchsten Pass von 4.655m. Da wir früh losfahren, weht noch kein Wind. Mir geht es nicht sehr gut, ich habe starke Magenkrämpfe und muss mich kurz vor dem Pass zum ersten mal erleichtern. Der Anstieg ist sehr schwer und steil und wir schieben beide des öfteren. Die Höhe macht es uns nicht leichter und oft schaffen wir nur 50m, bevor wir wieder pausieren. Die Landschaft um uns herum ist irreal, rote Berge, die mit der Lichteinstrahlung die Farbe ändern, kaum Vegetation und neben den lustigen Pfeiftönen der Murmeltiere, die uns neugierig beobachten, herrscht unheimliche Stille. Nach 12,5 km erreichen wir glücklich den Gipfel und ab hier geht es nur noch nach unten – sowohl was die Höhe aber auch meinen Gesundheitszustand anbelangt. So langsam komme ich mir wie ein Hund vor, der alle Paar Kilometer seine Marke hinterlässt. Nach dem Mittagessen passiert zum ersten Mal etwas Seltsames. Ungefähr 500m vor uns sehe ich  Menschen auf der Straße stehen, obwohl hier nichts um uns herum ist als Landschaft. Ich werde etwas nervös, da ich nicht weiß, was uns erwartet. Wir stecken unser Pfefferspray in die Tasche und radeln nebeneinander. Täglich passieren uns nur ungefähr 10 bis 20 Autos und wir wissen, dass wir auf uns selbst gestellt sind. Als wir näher kommen erkennen wir zwei Soldaten, die mit Maschinengewehren bewaffnet sind und einen weiteren Mann, der auf der Straße sitzt. Kurz bevor wir die Männer passieren, steht der sitzende Mann auf. Johan grüßt freundlich “Salam”, wir werden zurückgegrüßt und dürfen ungestört weiterradeln.

Gegen 15 Uhr beginnt es wieder zu winden und wieder ist es Gegenwind. Ich bin mittlerweile sehr erschöpft, mein Durchfall wird schlimmer und schlimmer und mit dem Wissen, dass wir noch mindestens zehn Kilometer gegen den Wind radeln müssen,  breche ich zusammen. Ich kann nicht mehr aufhören zu heulen, da ich nicht weiß, wie ich es bis ins nächste Dorf schaffen soll. Johan tröstet mich und in seinem Windschatten fahren wir langsam weiter. Als wir dann endlich nach einer letzten Kurve das Dorf im Tal liegen sehen, fließen die Tränen wieder – dieses Mal vor Freude. Wir haben es fast geschafft! Diese Nacht verbringe ich fast ausschließlich auf der Toilette – schon wieder schlaflos!

Leaving our camp early in the morning
Wir verlassen unser Lager am frühen Morgen
Washboard!
Waschbrett!
First toilet break
Erster Toilettenstopp!
Ascending the highest pass
Auf dem Weg zum Gipfel unseres höchsten Passes
Confident to be able to make it
Zuversichtlich, dass wir auch das schaffen!
Ha - we made it...
Ha – geschafft…
...but we definitely didn't fly
…geflogen sind wir allerdings nicht!
The beginning of a very long downhill
Der Anfang einer langen Abfahrt
Sand storms
Sandstürme
This was more or less the population between the pass and Murghab
Das war mehr oder weniger die gesamte Bevölkerung auf diesem Streckenabschnitt
Happily arrived in Murghab
Glücklich in Murghab

Tage 8 und 9: Murghab
Lange Radeltage, Essen, das ich wahrscheinlich nicht hätte zu mir nehmen sollen, eventuell verunreinigtes Wasser, Gegenwind, schlaflose Nächte aufgrund der Höhe, das härteste Radfahren auf schlechten Straßen, das ich je mitgemacht habe und ein schweres Fahrrad haben Spuren hinterlassen. Ich liege im Bett mit Fieber und sehr starkem Durchfall und muss zwei Tage pausieren. Die Symptome sprechen für Reisedurchfall und die Einnahme eines mitgebrachten Antibiotikums verbessern meinen Zustand am zweiten Tag schnell, so dass ich mich in der Lage fühle, morgen die Reise fortzusetzen.

A typical townhouse in the Pamirs
Ein typisches Stadthaus in den Pamirs
The desolate township of Murghab
Die etwas trostlose Stadt Murghab
Lenin welcomes us in the smallest village
Lenin heißt uns im kleinsten Dorf willkommen
Market time
Auf zum Markt!