We are Family

515km, 2.480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)
515km, 2,480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)

6 – 16 November, 2015 – Esfahan is the number-one tourist destination in Iran for good reason. We were blown away by its historic bazaars, tree-lined boulevards, the magnificent Imam Square, the second-largest square on earth, the Armenian quarter, its beautiful historic bridges and the Jameh Mosque, a veritable museum of Islamic architecture. We spent five full days relaxing, sightseeing, buying ourselves some nice souvenirs, extending our Iran visas and re-filling our batteries with good and often not so very healthy food – actually we had a burger or similar fast food almost every day. Fast food places are booming everywhere in Iran and hamburgers, hot dogs – often misspelled as hat dogs – or falafel sandwiches have become staple snacks besides kebab.

The great Imam Square: 

DSCF2246

At a mosque
In front of a mosque at the square

Imam square

DSCF2366

School kids
School kids

DSCF2571

DSCF3109

DSCF3171

DSCF3172DSCF3201At the bazaar: DSCF2755

DSCF2757

DSCF2600

DSCF2772

DSCF2769

Curry!
Curry!

At our hostel we met the first touring cyclist, Jakob from Stuttgart, and we exchanged roadside stories. There we also met an Iranian who was looking for French-speaking tourists. As I was the only one around he started chatting with me to practice his French. After all the usual questions such as “Where are you from?, What is your name?, Do you like Iran?” he invited us for lunch to his home. We were a little bit surprised by this spontaneous invitation and decided to decline it as we weren’t really sure about the man’s real intention. Was he a tour guide and expecting money from us? Was he trying to get anything else from us? Or was he just another friendly Iranian keen on demonstrating Iranian hospitality? We would never find out.

The Jameh (or Friday) Mosque: DSCF2653DSCF2836DSCF2698DSCF2895

In Esfahan we also noticed the exaggerated beauty-mania Iran is famous for. Never had we seen so many women – and men by the way – with plasters on their noses or face masks given their recent plastic surgery. Women are wearing an awful lot of make-up, shave off their eyebrows to repaint them in for us bizarre and unnatural shapes. Not only look all noses the same in a very unnatural way but also their lips and cheeks have been injected. We were easily able to distinguish a natural from an artificial Iranian face within seconds. For us a very disturbing and sad trend, as Iranian women and men are very handsome, even more so without plastic surgery.

The men’s mosque at the Imam Square:

DSCF2824DSCF2872DSCF2881DSCF2928At the river: 

DSCF3010

DSCF3034

DSCF3044

With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival - before there was no water in the river
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival – before there was no water in the river

In the meantime we also noticed that it was getting winter. At an altitude of around 1500 meters day temperatures were still around 20 degrees but declined heavily at night. Night frost became more common day by day but we were grateful for the still low precipitation.

Some random Esfahan shots: 

DSCF2734

DSCF3086

DSCF3189

At a fancy restaurant - a former hamam, food was just average though!
At a fancy restaurant – a former hammam, food was just average though!

We couldn’t leave Esfahan without going once more back to the Imam Square, this time with our bikes. Again, we got several invitations to come with people to their homes and again we declined. As soon as we are sitting on our fully loaded bikes, we are no longer the ‘normal’ tourists and attract a lot of attention, even in tourist-spoilt cities like Esfahan.

DSCF3276

Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.
Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.

P1230524

On our way out of Esfahan we met another touring cyclist on his way to Shiraz – Samuel (19) from Germany. Samuel has been cycling from Germany to Iran and is writing about his adventures on samuelontour.com. Together we cycled to Shiraz. We finally were a family! In Iran it is forbidden to share a hotel room, if a couple is not married. Hence, we kept telling people, that we are married, which always triggered the question of children we declined and which usually resulted in an awkward silence. But now we had another problem – just one son wasn’t enough either!

Leaving Esfahan
Leaving Esfahan
With Samuel
With Samuel
Always trying to find a good road to cycle - this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder
Always trying to find a good road to cycle – this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder

On our first evening together we slept at a mosque. While Johan, the organizer, checked the room I waited together with Samuel when a man approached us and started the usual talking. As soon as he found out that Samuel was neither my husband (!!!) nor my son he turned to Samuel whispering in his ears. Samuel’s reaction told me clearly that he got an immoral offer from a gay Iranian. And this, while the government declares proudly, that there are no gay people in the country ;-). It took a few minutes to make the guy understood that Samuel seriously doesn’t want to have sex with him before he drove off in his car. Samuel told us, that this has happened quite often to him and all the times in Iran. We spent the night in a warm and spacious room with two huge beds, a bathroom and even our own kitchen. In the morning we got breakfast served and our 10 Dollars for the room returned – again, people were treating us very well!

The mosque we stayed at
The mosque we stayed at

DSCF3349The longer we cycled the more interesting became the landscape. We were moving at an altitude of around 2000 meters. The barren desert-like landscape was lined by rugged mountains in the far distance, some of them snow-capped by now. Traffic lessened the further away we got from Esfahan and we could either cycle on good dirt roads right next to the main highway or on a wide shoulder. We crossed a few passes, often struggled with headwinds but sometimes also flew with the wind.

DSCF3354

DSCF3360

Fixing a problem with Samuel's chain
Fixing a problem with Samuel’s chain

The second night with Samuel we spent at the Red Crescent. This time, they were housed in a real building, not just containers and we got our own room, could use their showers and kitchen and once more enjoyed the warmth inside. This journey along the edge of the desert was becoming a very comfortable one as we had anticipated another 5-day-journey without showers or any other luxuries.

We are family!
We are family!
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn't filling enough
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn’t filling enough
Johan having fun on the road
Johan having fun on the road

Our third day after leaving Esfahan was our longest in terms of kilometers and time in the saddle. Almost all day we had to climb and the headwind didn’t make it any easier. I spent most of the day in Johan’s or Samuel’s slipstream to reduce waiting time for them and to make it easier for me. It’s not my preferred way of cycling, as I don’t like looking at the back of somebody all day long, even if it is Johan’s back. By 4pm we reached the top of a pass at around 2,500m and still had around 25km to cycle into town, which we reached within an hour as we now cycled mostly downhill. Shattered and cold we asked a few people for a place to stay and they drove us to a house, where we could stay in a filthy room for a bit more than 10 EUR. Despite Samuel being unhappy about our decision, as paying for accommodation wasn’t neither adventurous nor interesting, we took the room. In the end we all were glad to be able to stay at a warm place instead of pitching the tent in a dark park at freezing temperatures.

DSCF3461 DSCF3508 DSCF3465

P1230557After a slow start the following morning and with only Samuel being showered we continued our journey with today’s planned destination of Pasergardae, the place of Cyrus the Great’s tomb. At the beginning of another pass we met Jakob (19), another German touring cyclist, who joined our little family. Finally we were a ‘real’ family according to Iranian standards. Pasargadae is lesser known and besides Cyrus’ tomb not a really exciting site. The four of us still spent a few hours there and convinced Jakob to camp with us at the nearby restaurant. The following morning we woke to a completely frozen tent – very mystique, but very cold. Thankfully we could dry our tents and sleeping bags in the once again overheated restaurant. Something we noticed everywhere: now that it was getting colder, people started using their gas heating to an extent that was becoming extremely uncomfortable for us with inside temperatures of 25 degrees and above.

Samuel and Jakob
Samuel and Jakob
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Cyrus' tomb
Cyrus’ tomb

P1230565

DSCF3554

Our little campsite behind the restaurant
Our little campsite behind the restaurant
Freezing cold!
Freezing cold!

DSCF3570

After half a day’s downhill cycling on a road meandering through a huge canyon we reached Persepolis, a Unesco World Heritage Site and one of the cultural highlights of our Iran trip. Persepolis was the capital of the Achaemenid Empire founded by Darius I in 518 B.C.. He created an impressive palace complex with monumental staircases, exquisite reliefs, striking gateways and massive columns that left us in no doubt how great this empire must have been. The whole complex had been covered in dust and sand and was only rediscovered in 1931.

Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones
Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones

DSCF3590

Onion harvest
Onion harvest

P1230586

DSCF3628

Persepolis: 

For the family album :-)
For the family album 🙂

P1230603

Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front
Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front

DSCF3681

DSCF3777

DSCF3707

P1230610

DSCF3699

We once more camped all together at an official campsite under pine-trees close to the Persepolis ruins and did not leave the following morning before having a final look from the outside at the palaces. Shortly after our departure we lost our ‘kids’, who obviously were keen to reach Shiraz as quickly as possible. So we continued once more alone, crossing two more small passes before rolling down into Shiraz. Traffic was massif and cycling no fun and we were glad when we finally reached our hotel.

Watch Samuel’s videos of our time together here: video 1 and video 2.

Coffee break as there was no more need to hurry having lost the boys anyway

Getting closer to Shiraz
Getting closer to Shiraz

P1230632

Familienglück

515km, 2.480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)
515km, 2.480 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 4.268km und 32.352 Höhenmeter)

6. – 16. November 2015 – Esfahan ist die wichtigste Touristenattraktion im Iran aus gutem Grund. Wir waren fasziniert von den historischen Basaren, von den vielen Baumalleen mitten in der Stadt, vom einzigartigen Imam-Platz (übrigens Zweitgrößter weltweit!), vom armenischen Viertel, von den schönen historischen Brücken und der Freitagsmoschee, die eher einem Museum für islamische Architektur gleicht. Wir haben ganze fünf Tage hier verbracht um uns auszuruhen, die Stadt anzuschauen, Souvenirs zu kaufen, unsere Iran-Visa zu verlängern und um unsere Batterien mit gutem, aber oft auch wenig gesundem Essen aufzuladen. Um ehrlich zu sein, haben wir fast jeden Tag Hamburger oder Ähnliches gegessen! Snackbars boomen überall im Iran und Hamburger, Hot Dogs, Falafel Sandwiches & Co. sind hier mittlerweile fast so alltäglich wie Kebab.

Der großartige Imam-Platz: 

DSCF2246

At a mosque
Vor einer Moschee auf dem Platz

Imam square

DSCF2366

School kids
Schülerinnen-Ausflug

DSCF2571

DSCF3109

DSCF3171

DSCF3172DSCF3201

Auf dem Basar: DSCF2755

DSCF2757

DSCF2600

DSCF2772

DSCF2769

Curry!
Curry!

In unserem Hostel haben wir unseren ersten Radreisenden im Iran, Jakob aus Stuttgart getroffen und uns mit ihm rege ausgetauscht. Wir trafen dort auch auf einen Iraner, der nach französisch sprechenden Touristen Ausschau hielt. Da ich die einzige war, übte er mir mir. Nach den typischen Frage wie “Woher kommt ihr? Wie heißt ihr? Gefällt es euch im Iran?” lud er uns spontan zu sich nach Hause zum Essen ein. Etwas überrumpelt lehnten wir jedoch ab, da wir die wirkliche Absicht des Iraners nicht kannten. War er ein Reiseführer, der auf Kundenschau war? Wollte er sonst irgendetwas von uns? Oder war er doch nur ein weiterer freundlicher Iraner, der uns zeigen wollte, wie gastfreundlich hier doch die Menschen sind? Wir sollten es wohl nie erfahren.

Die Freitagsmoschee: DSCF2653DSCF2836DSCF2698DSCF2895

In Esfahan fiel uns auch zum ersten Mal der übertriebene Schönheitswahn auf, für den die Iraner so bekannt sind. Nirgendwo haben wir so viele Frauen – und übrigens auch Männer – mit Pflastern auf den Nasen und Mundschutz aufgrund einer kürzlich durchgeführten Operation gesehen. Frauen tragen sehr viel Make-Up, rasieren sich ihre Augenbrauen komplett weg, um sie in etwas merkwürdigen, oft eckigen Formen und viel zu kurz nachzuzeichnen. Mittlerweile sehen viele Nasen genau gleich aus und leider werden auch oft die Wangen und Lippen aufgespritzt. Innerhalb von Sekunden konnten wir ein natürliches von einem ‘bearbeiteten’ Gesicht unterscheiden. Für uns ein sehr irritierender und trauriger Trend, wo doch die Iraner eigentlich sehr schöne Menschen sind.

Männermoschee auf dem Imam-Platz:

DSCF2824DSCF2872DSCF2881DSCF2928Am Fluss: 

DSCF3010

DSCF3034

DSCF3044

With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
Diesen Polen haben wir bereits in unserem Hostel getroffen
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival - before there was no water in the river
Am Tag unserer Ankunft wurden die Schleusen des Damms geöffnet, davor floss hier im Fluss kein Wasser

In der Zwischenzeit wurde es allmählich Winter. Auf einer Höhe von ungefähr 1.500 Metern kletterte das Thermometer tagsüber noch immer auf um die 20 Grad, fiel aber nachts stark ab. Wir mussten immer wieder mit Nachtfrost rechnen, waren aber für den noch immer geringen Niederschlag sehr dankbar.

Noch mehr aus Esfahan: 

DSCF2734

DSCF3086

DSCF3189

At a fancy restaurant - a former hamam, food was just average though!
In einem coolen Restaurant, das früher einmal ein Hamam war. Leider war das Essen nur mäßig gut.

Am Tag unserer Abreise mussten wir nochmals über den Imam-Platz fahren. Wieder wurden wir mehrfach von Iranern nach Hause eingeladen und wieder lehnten wir ab. Sobald wir auf unseren voll beladenen Rädern sitzen, zählen wir nicht mehr zu den gewöhnlichen Touristen sondern sind eher eine Attraktion, selbst in Touristenhochburgen wie Esfahan.

DSCF3276

Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.
Beste Freunde? Nicht wirklich. Nach einem kurzen Pläuschchen wurden wir von ihr zum Tee eingeladen.

P1230524

Auf dem Weg aus der Stadt kam uns ein weiterer Radreisender hinterher geradelt – Samuel (19) aus Deutschland war ebenfalls auf dem Weg nach Shiraz und schloss sich uns an. Er ist aus Deutschland bis hierher geradelt und schreibt über seine Abenteuer auf samuelontour.com. Jetzt waren wir endlich eine Familie. Im Iran dürfen Unverheiratete kein Hotelzimmer teilen. Aus diesem Grund erzählten wir auch immer, dass wir verheiratet seien, was natürlich immer gleich die Kinderfrage zur Folge hatte. Eine Verneinung führte dann immer zu betretenem Schweigen. Mit Samuel hatten wir allerdings ein weiteres Problem – nur ein Sohn war natürlich nicht genug!

Leaving Esfahan
Kurz nach Esfahan
With Samuel
Mit Samuel
Always trying to find a good road to cycle - this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder
Immer auf der Suche nach guten Alternativen – dieses Mal ein Schotterweg neben der verkehrsreichen Hauptstraße ohne Seitenstreifen

An unserem ersten gemeinsamen Abend schliefen wir in einer Moschee. Während unser Organisator Johan das Zimmer inspizierte, wartete ich gemeinsam mit Samuel vor der Moschee. Irgendwann kam ein Mann auf uns zu und stellte die üblichen Fragen. Als er herausfand, dass Samuel weder mein Ehemann (!!!) noch mein Sohn war, wandte er sich Samuel zu, um ihm etwas ins Ohr zu flüstern. An seiner Reaktion war mir klar, dass er wieder einmal ein unmoralisches Angebot von einem schwulen Iraner bekommen hatte. Und das, obwohl die Regierung so stolz erklärt, dass es im Land keine Homosexuellen gäbe – haha! Es dauerte eine Weile, bis der Typ verstand, dass Samuel nicht mit ihm die Kiste springen will. Später erzählte uns Samuel, dass ihm das im Iran bereits öfters passiert sei. Diese Nacht verbrachten wir in einem luxuriösen Zimmer mit Küche, Bad und zwei riesigen Betten. Am Morgen wurde uns das Frühstück serviert und die zehn Dollar, die wir eigentlich hätten bezahlen müssen, bekamen wir auch wieder zurück. Wieder einmal ist es uns sehr gut ergangen!

 

The mosque we stayed at
In dieser Moschee haben wir übernachtet

Je weiter wir uns von Esfahan entfernten, desto schöner und interessanter wurde die Landschaft. Wir befanden uns jetzt auf einem Hochplateau auf ungefähr 2.000 Metern. Die karge, wüstenartige Landschaft wurde in der Ferne von schroffen, teils schneebedeckten Bergen eingerahmt. Der Verkehr wurde auch immer weniger und wir radelten entweder auf Schottenwegen neben der Hauptstraße oder auf einem breiten Seitenstreifen. Wir überquerten einige Pässe, kämpften häufig gegen den Wind, hatten aber manches Mal auch Glück und durften mit dem Wind fahren. 
DSCF3354DSCF3360

Fixing a problem with Samuel's chain
Behebung eines Kettenproblems

Die zweite gemeinsame Nacht mit Samuel verbrachten wir beim Roten Halbmond. Dieses Mal waren wir in einem richtigen Haus untergebracht, bekamen unser eigenes Zimmer und es gab sogar Duschen und eine Küche. Wieder waren wir froh, dass wir im Warmen übernachten konnten. Diese Reise am Rande der Wüste wurde sehr komfortabel, sind wir doch davon ausgegangen, dass wir die fünf Tage ohne Duschen und sonstigen Luxus verbringen würden.

We are family!
Eine richtige Familie!
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn't filling enough
Zweites Frühstück, nachdem unser Porridge scheinbar nicht genug war
Johan having fun on the road
Ich will Spaß, ich will Spaß…

Am dritten Tag nach Esfahan verbrachten wir die längste Zeit im Sattel und radelten auch die meisten Kilometer. Fast den ganzen Tag ging es bergauf und der Gegenwind machte die Sache nicht einfacher. Ich fuhr fast den ganzen Tag entweder in Johans oder Samuels Windschatten, um mir die Arbeit zu erleichtern und die Wartezeiten für die beiden zu verkürzen. Mir macht das allerdings keinen wirklichen Spaß, den ganzen Tag auf den Rücken des Vorausfahrenden zu schauen, auch wenn es Johans Rücken ist! Gegen 16 Uhr erreichten wir dann den Gipfel auf ungefähr 2,500m, mussten bis zur nächsten Stadt aber noch 25km radeln. Da es fast ausschließlich bergab ging, schafften wir das in einer Stunde. Kaputt und ausgekühlt fragten wir nach Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten und wir wurden zu einem Haus gefahren, in dem dreckige Zimmer vermietet wurden. Für etwas mehr als 10 EUR blieben wir, obwohl Samuel mit unserer Entscheidung nicht glücklich war, da ein zu bezahlendes Zimmer weder abenteuerlich noch interessant ist. Am Ende waren wir dann aber doch alle froh, in einem warmen Zimmer zu übernachten, anstelle unser Zelt im Dunkeln im Park bei eisigen Temperaturen aufzuschlagen.

DSCF3461 DSCF3508 DSCF3465

P1230557

Den nächsten Morgen ließen wir gemächlich angehen und trotz Badezimmer duschte nur Samuel. Heute wollten wir Pasergardae erreichen, die Grabstelle von Kyros dem Großen. An einem weiteren Pass trafen wir Jakob (19), noch einen deutschen Radfahrer, der sich unserer kleinen Familie anschloss. Jetzt waren wir nach iranischen Maßstäben endlich eine richtige Familie! Pasargadae ist als Touristenattraktion nicht sehr bekannt und bis auf das Grab auch ein wenig langweilig. Trotzdem verbrachten wir einige Stunden und überzeugten Jakob später, mit uns hinter einem Restaurant zu zelten. Am nächsten Morgen waren Landschaft und unsere Zelte wie mit Zuckerguss überzogen – alles war weiß und sehr mystisch, aber leider auch sehr kalt. Zum Glück konnten wir unsere Zelte und Schlafsäcke im völlig überheizten Restaurant trocknen. Das fiel uns übrigens überall auf: plötzlich wurde wie verrückt geheizt – mit für uns extrem unangenehmen Temperaturen von oft über 25 Grad.

Samuel and Jakob
Samuel und Jakob
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Mittagessen mit Samuel und Jakob in Pasergardae
Cyrus' tomb
Das Grab Kyros des Großen

P1230565

DSCF3554

P1230565

Freezing cold!
Arschkalt!

DSCF3570

Nachdem wir einen halben Tag nur bergab rollten, auf einer Straße, die sich durch einen riesigen Canyon schlängelte, erreichten wir Persepolis, Unesco Weltkulturerbe und einer unserer kulturellen Höhepunkte im Iran. Persepolis war die Hauptstadt des achaemenidischen Imperiums, gegründet von Darius I 515 v.Chr. Er hat einen beeindruckenden Palastkomplex mit monumentalen Treppenaufgängen, exquisiten Reliefs, markanten Toren und massiven Säulen geschaffen, das keine Zweifel offen lies, wie groß diese Imperium einmal gewesen sein muss. Erst 1931 wurde der gesamte Komplex wiederentdeckt, bis dahin war alles mit Staub und Sand bedeckt.

Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones
Zweites Frühstück für unsere hungrigen Jungs, Kaffee für die Alten

DSCF3590

Onion harvest
Zwiebelernte

P1230586

DSCF3628

Persepolis: 

For the family album :-)
Für’s Familienalbum 🙂

P1230603

Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front
Der Versuch zu fotografieren, ohne störendes Glas im Vordergrund

DSCF3681

DSCF3777

DSCF3707

P1230610

DSCF3699

Noch einmal zelteten wir alle zusammen auf einem offiziellen Zeltplatz unter Pinienbäumen in der Nähe der Persepolis-Ruinen und fuhren am nächsten Morgen erst weiter, nachdem wir nochmals einen letzten Blick auf Persepolis geworfen hatten. Kurz nach unserem Aufbruch verloren wir allerdings unsere ‘Kinder’, die Shiraz offensichtlich so schnell wie möglich erreichen wollten. Also fuhren wir wieder alleine, über zwei kleine Berge, bevor wir endlich in Shiraz einrollten. Auf diesem Streckenteil war der Verkehr grausam und das Fahrradfahren hat nicht wirklich Spaß gemacht und so waren wir froh, als wir endlich unser Hotel erreichten.

Samuel hat zwei Videos unserer gemeinsamen Zeit veröffentlicht, die ihr hier anschauen könnt: Video 1 und Video 2.

Getting closer to Shiraz
Auf dem Weg nach Shiraz

P1230632

Through the Iranian Desert

619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)
619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)

25 October – 5 November, 2015 – We were ready to leave before 8am after a bad night’s sleep with noisy neighbors when two men from the local newspaper approached us for an interview without even asking if it was OK for us. Thirty minutes and many questions and photos later we left the mosque with a bag full of raisins and walnuts – a gift from the journalists. They filmed us while we were leaving the city and wished us good luck for our next part of the trip through the desert.

We were now looking forward to quiet roads and starry nights. The first night we camped behind some abandoned stables off the highway and while cooking dinner we were approached by a man in a car.  For minutes he talked in Farsi to us. When he finally noticed that we didn’t understand a word, he left again. We wondered for a while how he found us as we had followed a small track and thought nobody could see us here.

This is our daily bread - not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
This is our daily bread, best eaten fresh from the bakery as it feels like chewing on cardboard after a few hours – not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
Photo session at the mosque
Photo session at the mosque
One of the reporters
Reporter 1 and photographer…
...and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions.
…and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions and with our bag full of raisins and walnuts..

DSCF0663

Finally an empty road
Finally an empty road
There is still some life in the desert
There is still some life in the desert
Who's the camel?
Who’s the camel?
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Preparing breakfast...
Preparing breakfast…
Breakfast at a what we thought well-hidden place
…eating breakfast!
A typical desert village
A typical desert village

During the day temperatures still climbed well beyond 30 degrees and the cloudless sky and treeless desert left us with nowhere to shelter from the heat. Every once in a while people would stop to give us food or just ask if we were OK or needed anything. In the early afternoon we reached a small desert town and were stopped by a police car. By the time I caught up with Johan, he was surrounded by four men – three policemen and an English teacher. I got a little worried only to learn later, that the police had seen us earlier and as they didn’t speak English they had picked up the English teacher to welcome us. They wanted to make sure we would find a good place to sleep and food for the evening. I was overwhelmed when the English teacher asked us to tell our friends and families at home that Iranians are good people. That was not the first time we were asked that. Iranians feel pretty misunderstood by the Western world and they are extremely keen on being seen as hospitable and kind. Often we would be asked if we also thought that all Iranians are terrorists, as this is – according to their understanding – what BBC and CNN would broadcast.

DSCF0685

Another village
Another village

DSCF0751

Relaxing at the guesthouse
Lunch break
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling

After three days of difficult cycling through undulating barren landscapes and daily headwinds we reached the desert town Tabas from where we took the train to Yazd. Iran is four times the size of Germany or three times the size of France which made it impossible for us to cycle every single stretch. Trains in Iran are pretty cool, but leave at pretty uncool times, which again makes them very cool, as they are empty and a lot of train staff takes care of a few passengers. Our train left at 2am in the morning and we got our own comfortable sleeping compartment and our bikes got their own next to us. In fact, we were the only passengers in our carriage. In the morning we had breakfast in the train restaurant and we felt a bit like sitting in the famous Orient-Express.

Change of scenery
Change of scenery
Sand dunes
Sand dunes
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius

DSCF0990

DSCF1025

At the mosque in Tabas
At the mosque in Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
In the mosque
In the mosque
And the mosque at night
And the mosque at night
Leaving Tabas by train
Leaving Tabas by train
Sleeping in the train...
Sleeping in the train…
...and breakfast with the train staff
…and breakfast with the train staff.

In Yazd we checked into a far too expensive hotel for a shabby room and filthy shared bathrooms only to change the next day to a traditional hotel at the same price with our own clean bathroom. Yazd is one of the highlights in Iran with its forests of windtowers, the so-called badgirs and winding lanes through the mud-brick old town. We cycled through a labyrinth of small alleys, got lost in the huge covered bazaar and chilled with good coffee and food in one of the many rooftop restaurants while enjoying a fabulous vista of old Yazd.

Impressions of Yazd: 

DSCF1304
The famous badgirs (wind towers) of Yazd – formerly used as air-conditioning
Cycling through the narrow alleys
Cycling through the narrow alleys
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
Sweets shop
Sweets shop
The dome of a mosque
The dome of a mosque
Imam Hossein celebrations
Imam Hossein celebrations

DSCF1491

DSCF1647

Praying
Praying

P1230459

At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
At the bazaar
At the bazaar

From Yazd we continued once more North in the direction of famous Esfahan. Unfortunately the wind had changed and instead of coming from the South it now blew straight into our faces. Cranky we continued anyway. Wind is the most unfair cycling condition and without doubt the most hated by cyclists. As our cycling friend Annika from Tasting Travels nicely put it in one of her blog posts: Mountains are fair as you know that after a long climb a downhill will follow. However, you cannot expect that a headwind turns into a tailwind the next day. Nonetheless we pedaled on and gave up at around lunchtime to visit an old castle from 4000 BC and the beautiful and much less touristy mud-brick town Meybod.

Roadside billboards
A typical roadside billboard…
...and another one!
…and another one!
At the Maybod castle
At the Meybod citadel
Always searching for the perfect shot :-)
Always searching for the perfect shot 🙂
The castle in its full glory or what's left from it
The citadel in its full glory or what’s left from it
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn't allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn’t allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!

DSCF1983

Meybod
Meybod

DSCF2042

Shopping
Shopping

Even though we were still cycling through the desert it was clearly getting winter. The evenings and nights were cold with temperatures close to or below 0 degrees Celsius and during the day the quicksilver seldom climbed over 20 degrees anymore. On our way to Esfahan we camped two more times, once for free behind a what we thought abandoned caravanserai. We had just finished our abundant dinner of two hard boiled eggs each and were ready to crawl into our sleeping bags, when a car passed. It seemed that there were still people living at the caravanserai, but they either hadn’t seen us or weren’t interested, they left us alone all night. The second night we camped for very little money in a hotel garden.

At a police checkpoint. They would always exhibit terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving
At a police checkpoint. They would always show terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving

DSCF2093

Another quiet campspot behind a caravanserai
Another quiet camp spot behind a caravanserai

DSCF2095

Selfie with a 'roadworker'
Selfie with a ‘roadworker’
What is he doing there?
What is he doing there?
The truck drivers love their Macks
The truck drivers love their Macks

Thanks to the headwind we made very little progress and needed four full days to reach Esfahan. The scenery was relatively boring compared to what we had seen before and on top we were cycling on busy roads without shoulders and often had to leave the road to avoid collisions with passing trucks. The last 40 kilometers into Esfahan were absolutely dreadful with extreme heavy truck traffic. We must have breathed in tons of diesel exhaust and cycling didn’t feel very healthy anymore. Additionally we were cycling through a vast industrial area with mainly steel and petrochemical plants. That day I thought to myself that this might be the first day we wouldn’t get anything from passing people. But also this time I was wrong. Right at the entrance of Esfahan we were handed over two pomegranates, 500 meters further we got a rice-dish – perfect for us as it was lunchtime. In the middle of the busy traffic in the city center a man stuck his hand out of his open car window with a bucket full of a yummy rice-and-saffron dessert. Iranians treated us once again very well!

DSCF2102

We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn't stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car :-)
We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn’t stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car 🙂
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km

DSCF2136

To avoid the worst
To avoid the worst

DSCF2166

And now me?
And now me?
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road

Durch die Wüste Irans

Bildschirmfoto 2015-12-25 um 11.48.30
619km, 2.659 Höhenmeter ( insgesamt 3.753km und 29.872 Höhenmeter)

25. Oktober – 5. November 2015 – Nach einer sehr schlecht geschlafenen Nacht mit lärmenden Nachbarn waren wir trotzdem um 8 Uhr startklar. Plötzlich kamen zwei Reporter der lokalen Zeitung auf uns zugestürmt, und begannen, uns zu interviewen ohne uns zu fragen, ob wir das auch wollten. Nach einer halben Stunde, vielen Fragen und Fotos machten konnten wir uns endlich auf den Weg – aber erst, nachdem wir eine Riesentüte mit Rosinen und Walnüssen verstaut hatten – ein Geschenk der Journalisten. Sie filmten uns noch, wie wir aus der Stadt rausfuhren und riefen uns “Good luck” hinterher. Jetzt freuten wir uns auf die Wüste und etwas ruhigere Straßen und die nächtlichen Sternenhimmel. In der ersten Nacht zelteten wir hinter verlassenen Ställen abseits der Straße. Als wir kochten, kam plötzlich ein Mann in seinem Auto angefahren und sprach minutenlang in Farsi auf Johan ein. Als ihm dann endlich klar wurde, dass Johan kein Wort verstand, zog er wieder von dannen. Wir wunderten uns noch eine Weile, wie er uns hatte finden können, da wir einem kleinen Sandpfad in die Wüste folgten und hinter den Ställen waren wir eigentlich von der Straße aus nicht zu sehen.

This is our daily bread - not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
Unser tägliches Brot, das am Besten frisch gegessen wird, da es sich nach ein Paar Stunden anfühlt, als kaue man auf Pappkarton.
Photo session at the mosque
Fotosession in der Moschee
One of the reporters
Reporter 1 und Fotograf…
...and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions.
…und Reporter 2, der Englischlehrer, der die Fragen stellte mit unseren Rosinen und Walnüssen..

DSCF0663

Finally an empty road
Endlich leere Straßen
There is still some life in the desert
Es gibt noch Leben in der Wüste
Who's the camel?
Wer ist hier das Kamel?
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Wunderbarer Zeltplatz
Preparing breakfast...
Frühstück wird vorbereitet…
Breakfast at a what we thought well-hidden place
…und schnell verzehrt!
A typical desert village
Ein typisches Wüstendorf

Tagsüber kletterten die Temperaturen weit über 30 Grad und ein wolkenloser Himmel und die baumlose Wüste boten keinerlei Schatten. Immer wieder hielten Autofahrer an, um uns etwas zu essen zu geben oder um nur nachzufragen, ob alles in Ordnung sei. Eines frühen Nachmittags erreichten wir eine kleine Wüstenstadt, an deren Stadtrand wir von einem Polizeiauto und vier Männern empfangen wurden. Mir wurde zunächst etwas mulmig, nur um dann zu erfahren, dass die Polizisten uns bereits vor ein Paar Stunden gesehen hatten. Da sie selbst kein Englisch sprachen, holten sie sich den Englischlehrer, der uns begrüßte und erklären sollte, wo wir schlafen und essen könnten. Darüber war ich schon äußerst positiv überrascht, haben wir doch so viele Gruselgeschichten von der iranischen Polizei gehört. Als uns dann später der Englischlehrer noch bat, dass wir doch unseren Freunden und Familien zuhause erzählen sollten, dass Iraner gute Menschen seien, waren wir beide sehr gerührt. Und das passierte uns nicht zum ersten Mal. Iraner fühlen sich vom Westen ziemlich missverstanden und sind sehr darauf bedacht, als gastfreundlich und liebenswürdig angesehen zu werden. Oft wurden wir sogar gefragt, ob wir auch denken würden, dass alle Iraner Terroristen seien, da dies ja schließlich das sei, worüber die Medien im Westen berichten.

DSCF0685

Another village
Ein anderes Wüstendorf

DSCF0751

Relaxing at the guesthouse
Mittagspause
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling
Mein Outfit, Gegenwind und Hitze erschweren das Wüstenradeln

Nach drei sehr schweren Tagen durch hügelige und karge Landschaften mit täglichem Gegenwind kamen wir in der Wüstenstadt Tabas an, von wo aus wir den Zug nach Yazd nahmen. Iran ist viermal so groß wie Deutschland oder dreimal so groß wie Frankreich, wodurch es uns zeitlich nicht möglich war, jeden Kilometer per Rad zurückzulegen. Züge im Iran sind übrigens ziemlich cool, die Abfahrtszeiten dagegen ziemlich uncool, was Züge wiederum sehr cool macht, da sie leer sind und sich viel Zugpersonal um wenig Reisende kümmern kann. Unser Zug fuhr um 2 Uhr morgens ab und wir hatten ein eigenes, komfortables Abteil ganz für uns alleine, ein weiteres bekamen unsere Räder. Tatsächlich hatten wir sogar einen ganzen Waggon für uns alleine. Am Morgen frühstückten wir dann im  Bordrestaurant und fühlten uns ein bisschen wie im Orientexpress.

Change of scenery
Endlich ändert sich die Landschaft ein wenig
Sand dunes
Sanddünen
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius
Mittagsschläfchen bei ungefähr 40 Grad Celsius

DSCF0990

DSCF1025

At the mosque in Tabas
Vor der Moschee in Tabak
The gardens of Tabas
In den Gärten von Tabas
In the mosque
In der Moschee
And the mosque at night
Und die Moschee bei Nacht
Leaving Tabas by train
Mitten in der Nacht am Bahnhof von Tabas
Sleeping in the train...
Ein Schlafplatz im Zug…
...and breakfast with the train staff
…und Frühstück mit dem Zugpersonal.

In Yazd angekommen bezahlten wir die erste Nacht viel zu viel Geld für ein schäbiges Zimmer und dreckige Gemeinschaftsbäder und suchten uns am nächsten Tag ein traditionelles Hotel zum gleichen Preis, allerdings mit eigenem Badezimmer. Yazd zählt zu den touristischen Highlights Irans mit seinen vielen Windtürmen, die sogenannten Badgirs und sich windenden Gassen mit Lehmbauten in der Altstadt. Wir radelten durch ein Labyrinth kleiner Straßen, verliefen uns im riesigen Basar und genossen leckeren Kaffee und gutes Essen in einem der zahlreichen Restaurants mit Dachterrasse und fantastischer Aussicht über die Stadt.

Eindrücke von Yazd: 

DSCF1304
Die berühmten Windtürme von Yazd – diese dienten früher zur Kühlung der Häuser, als es noch keine Klimaanlagen gab.
Cycling through the narrow alleys
Radfahren durch enge Gassen
The view from the roof top cafe at our hotel
Aussicht von der Dachterrasse unseres Hotels
Sweets shop
Süßigkeitenladen
The dome of a mosque
Eine Moscheekuppel
Imam Hossein celebrations
Imam Hossain-Feierlichkeiten

DSCF1491

DSCF1647

Praying
Beten

P1230459

At the Zoroastrian Fire Temple where it is believed that a flame has been burning for over 1,500 years
Zoroastrischer Feuertempel, in dem eine Flamme anscheinend seit über 1.500 Jahren ununterbrochen brennt.
At the bazaar
Basar

Von Yazd ging es dann weiter in Richtung Norden, nach Esfahan. Leider drehte auch der Wind und blies jetzt auf einmal aus dem Norden. Schlecht gelaunt fuhren wir trotzdem weiter. Wind ist für Radfahrer so mit das unwillkommenste und meist gehasste Element. Annika von Tasting Travels hat das in einem ihrer Blogs einmal sehr schön formuliert: Berge sind fair, da man sich nach einem langen Anstieg auch immer auf die Abfahrt freuen kann. Anders ist das mit Gegenwind, der am nächsten Tag nicht automatisch zu Rückenwind wird. Trotzdem gaben wir nicht auf und radelten bis mittags weiter, um die wenig touristische Lehmstadt Meybod und ihre alte Zitadelle, die es anscheinend seit 4000 v.Chr. gibt, zu besichtigen.  .

Roadside billboards
Ein typisches Plakat am Straßenrand…
...and another one!
…und noch so eines!
At the Maybod castle
Zitadelle von Meybod
Always searching for the perfect shot :-)
Immer auf der Suche nach dem perfekten Foto!
The castle in its full glory or what's left from it
Die Zitadelle in voller Pracht oder das, was davon noch übrig ist.
Johan successfully hiding his new and far too short haircut. In fact, I wasn't allowed to take his picture for the coming three weeks!!!
Johan versteckt sich erfolgreich hinter seiner Kamera und das wegen seiner neuen und viel zu kurzen Frisur. Ganze drei Wochen durfte ich ihn nicht mehr fotografieren!

DSCF1983

Meybod
Meybod

DSCF2042

Shopping
Einkaufen

Obwohl wir noch immer durch die Wüste fuhren wurde es spürbar Winter. Die Abende und Nächte waren kalt mit Temperaturen um oder unter 0 Grad Celsius und tagsüber kletterten die Temperaturen kaum über 20 Grad. Auf dem Weg nach Esfahan zelteten wir noch zweimal, einmal hinter einer wie wir dachten verlassenen Karawanserei. Nachdem wir unser üppiges Abendmahl von je zwei hartgekochten Eiern verdrückt hatten und wir gerade in unsere Schlafsäcke kriechen wollten, fuhr plötzlich ein Auto vorbei. Scheinbar wohnten doch noch Menschen in der Karawanserei, aber entweder hatten sie uns nicht gesehen oder sie interessierten sich nicht für uns. Jedenfalls ließen sie uns die ganze Nacht über in Ruhe. In der folgenden Nacht zelteten wir in einem Hotelgarten für wenig Geld.

At a police checkpoint. They would always exhibit terribly damaged cars to promote safe driving
Ein Polizei-Checkpoint. Hier werden oft völlig zerstörte Autos ausgestellt, um für sicheres Autofahren zu werben

DSCF2093

Another quiet campspot behind a caravanserai
Ein ruhiger Zeltplatz hinter einer Karawanserei

DSCF2095

Selfie with a 'roadworker'
Selfie mit einem “Straßenarbeiter”
What is he doing there?
Was macht er da?
The truck drivers love their Macks
Die LKW-Fahrer lieben ihre Macks

Aufgrund des starken Gegenwindes kamen wir nur sehr langsam voran und brauchten ganze vier Tage bis Esfahan. Die Landschaft war vergleichsweise langweilig, außerdem mussten wir auf sehr befahrenen Straßen ohne Seitenstreifen fahren. Das führte oft dazu, dass wir bei Gegenverkehr von der Straße runter mussten. Die letzten 40km vor Esfahan waren absolut fürchterlich: starker LKW-Verkehr und Industriegebiete mit Stahl- und Petrochemiefabriken. An diesem Tag dachte ich noch, heute bekommen wir wohl nichts geschenkt, doch auch dieses Mal hatte ich mich getäuscht. Am Stadteingang von Esfahan bekamen wir auf der befahrenen Straße erst zwei Granatäpfel und keine 500m später hielt ein Mann an, um uns ein leckeres Reisgericht zu überreichen. Und in der Innenstadt hielt plötzlich ein weiterer Mann seinen Arm aus dem Fenster, um uns einen kleinen Eimer Reispudding zu schenken. Auch auf diesem Abschnitt unserer Reise haben uns die Iraner sehr verwöhnt!

DSCF2102

We had just finished our second breakfast when this man came over to give us more food. He couldn't stop and each time we accepted something, he would get more out of his car :-)
Wir hatten soeben zum zweiten Mal gefrühstückt, als dieser Mann dazukam, um uns noch mehr Essen zu geben. Jedes Mal, wenn wir etwas akzeptieren, kam er mit etwas anderem an :-).
An old caravanserai along the silk road which can be found every 30 km to 40 km
Eine alte Karawanserei an der Seidenstraße, die es hier alle 30 bis 40 km zu sehen gibt.

DSCF2136

To avoid the worst
Um Schlimmeres zu vermeiden

DSCF2166

And now me?
Und ich jetzt auch noch?
Enjoying our lunch we just got from another nice Iranian next to the busy road
Leckeres Mittagessen am Straßenrand, das uns soeben ein netter Iraner überreichte

New Clothes, New Customs – Getting a Feel for Iran

Fast facts Iran

  • Three times the size of France or four times the size of Germany
  • Population of 78 million people
  • According to Iran Journal, Iran is the country with the most plastic surgeries in the world – and we tend to confirm that, as we’ve never seen so many (wo)men with plasters on their noses or with injected lips and cheeks
  • Bordering countries: Irak, Turkey, Azerbaijan and Armenia (West and Northwest), Turkmenistan (North/Northeast), Afghanistan and Pakistan (East/Southeast)
  • Iran is home to one of the world’s oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Proto-Elamite and Elamite kingdoms in 3200–2800 BC. The Iranian Medes unified the area into the first of many empires in 625 BC, after which it became the dominant cultural and political power in the region (Wikipedia)
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)

13 – 24 October, 2015 – Getting through customs and to Iran was easy. Between the two borders I dressed up and replaced short trousers by long trousers, T-Shirt by long-sleeved tunic and wrapped a beige scarf around my head. Once our visas were checked and stamped the customs officers who had to check our luggage welcomed us, chatted a while with us and let us through without checking anything. After five strange days in a little welcoming country we were now very anxious to experience Iranian hospitality we’ve heard so much about. But first we had to cycle through barren mountainous and remote landscapes where we would hardly meet a soul. At the end of the first day in Iran we stopped at a small and desolate village to find a place to sleep but only succeeded after almost an hour. A shop owner let us sleep in his storage room that strongly smelled of gasoline.

New outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
New cycling outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel - tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel – tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
The barren landscape
The barren landscape
At our first Iranian 'homestay'
At our first Iranian ‘homestay’

We continued early the following morning still having the smell of gasoline in our noses. Traffic had picked up quite a bit as we were now on one of the main transit routes for trucks between Turkey and Turkmenistan. After all these quiet roads we still needed to get used to heavy traffic. Arriving in Quchan, our first town in Iran, felt bizarre. We hadn’t seen any Iranian women so far and suddenly the town was crowded with women dressed in their black Chadors – a huge piece of fabric wrapped around them. People were staring at us, I think not many tourists have ever passed this town. Whenever somebody could speak some English, that person would approach us and ask if they could help. A nice couple even helped us with buying me a new cycling outfit and accompanied us to many different shops until I found something suitable for Iran. I still felt a little awkward in my now even more colorful new clothes but they confirmed that there was no need for me to wear black as all Iranian women. In fact she told me that she would wear dark colours only at official occasions and for work. I was relieved as I didn’t want to get arrested by the moral police for non-conformal attire.

Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Where is the black sheep?
Where is the black sheep or is it even a goat?
One of the first villages close to Quchan
One of the first villages close to Quchan
Arriving in Quchan - a typical black religious banner
Arriving in Quchan – a typical black religious banner
A woman - finally! And a billboard with men that died in the Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.
A woman – finally! And a billboard with men that died during the Iran/Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.

It was more difficult for me to get used to the scarf and it happened more than once that my scarf went loose and I often only noticed when I saw people laughing about my clumsiness. That reaction also made me feel much more comfortable in my attire, knowing that most Iranians didn’t care too much about what I was wearing. And covering up also has its advantages: I saved a lot on sunscreen and bad-hair-days belonged to the past, even better, my hair wouldn’t get as filthy anymore from the truck and car exhaust, so I was also saving on shampoo.

What we definitely couldn’t get used to was the sudden lack of free access to information. Not only were our Facebook and Blog websites no longer accessible for us, most Western news sites were suddenly blocked after we went there more than once. Internet was slow and at times non-existing, even in big cities. Everything is controlled by the government in this country.

My new outfit - over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing :-(
My new outfit – over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing 😦

We were now cycling in the direction of the Iranian desert but still had to overcome a few mountains and passes. Until now we were still waiting for the so famous Iranian hospitality, so far we hadn’t noticed any difference to Central Asian or Southeast Asian countries. But that would change almost immediately. We were cycling uphill and – surprise, surprise – with a very cold wind in our backs. At the police control at the top of a hill we were treated with hot tea and later at a village the local English teacher would invite us to stay at his home for the night. We declined, as we wanted to benefit from the tailwind and the downhills knowing our luck with this element. The landscape reminded us a lot on Kyrgyzstan with its rugged mountains and sparse vegetation around us. Around 10km before our final stop for the day – dusk was around – a police car turned up, escorted us into town and showed us a truck stop where we could sleep for free and enjoy the Iranian staple food chicken kebab.

Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches
Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches – and trying to get used to sitting on the ground instead of a table
Potato harvest - there is clearly no lack of workforce
Potato harvest – there is clearly no lack of workforce

DSCF0376

DSCF0380

DSCF0390

DSCF0399

With our host at the truck stop
With our host at the truck stop

That night it rained heavily and we were happy we weren’t sleeping in our tent. We were now looking forward to our first real rest day in Sabzevar in a while – but first we had to cross another pass with tired legs and Johan not feeling well. Again we were rewarded by beautiful weather and stunning rugged landscapes. Traffic continued picking up tremendously after the pass which I didn’t like too much and Johan didn’t mind at all. Our rest day in Sabzevar turned out to become a rest week – at least for me – as Johan got the flu and stayed most of the time in bed trying to recover.

Coffee break right before the pass
Coffee break right before the pass
At this point we thought it would now only go down - but another peak was waiting for us
At this point we thought it would now only go down – but another peak was waiting for us

DSCF0438

DSCF0458

Arrival in Sabzevar
Arrival in Sabzevar

The day we could finally move on again it rained. We left anyhow, we couldn’t wait riding our bikes again. So far we hadn’t gotten a real feel for Iran staying in hotels most of the time. Not only did it rain, we also had to cycle against the wind. Not a good start for a long cycling day. Within no time the rain got worse and the temperature dropped. At lunchtime we luckily reached a village and knocked at the door of the Red Crescent facilities to ask if we could eat inside to get warm and dry. We were welcomed by four young guys in Red Crescent uniforms and seated on the ground in front of the heating. Of course we were not allowed to unpack our lunch and instead ate Dizi after the Iranian table – a square plastic tablecloth – was set on the ground. As the rain and wind just continued they invited us to sleep at their facilities and we happily accepted. We both weren’t keen on cycling in the rain and even less on camping in the rain. It also happened to be the first day of the 10-day-long Imam Hossein mourning ceremonies and in the late afternoon a few villagers accompanied by an English teacher visiting her family for the celebrations came by to have tea with us and ask us all kinds of questions, e.g. if we had problems with using the Iranian squat toilets. They invited us to join their celebrations at the mosque and we again happily accepted. We went by car to the mosque that was around 200m away. I then went with the English teacher to the women’s mosque and Johan continued with the men. Before we entered the mosque, I got introduced to the about 100 women already sitting in a huge hall along the walls. Everybody was curiously looking at this stranger in even stranger colourful clothes. We sat down as well and shortly after the Iranian table was laid out once more, dinner was served: bread with yoghurt, Dizi again, which is a greasy soup where you soak in bread crumbs and later add sheep meet and vegetables. The women couldn’t stop looking and smiling at me, and telling me how happy they were that I was joining them. After what I thought was a short prayer by one woman and a reply by all the other women, everybody stood up – to first take a photo with me – and then to leave. Within one hour we had eaten and the celebrations were over – only to be continued over the coming ten days. I was a bit disappointed as I earlier saw processions on TV where men dressed in black chastised themselves. I thought similar things would happen here. When I met Johan later again, not much more happened in the men’s mosque.

Saffron
Saffron – looks like crocus
The two well-known guys again!
The two well-known guys again!

P1230333

Lunch at the Red Crescent
Lunch at the Red Crescent
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star

The following morning we left after a long photo session at chilly temperatures and of course against the wind. At least the rain had stopped. We were heading into the mountains and were climbing until after 3pm before we could start our fast descend – we only had little time left before nightfall for the remaining 40km, but with a strong tailwind and a continuous downhill we managed easily. Each time we stopped for a break, a car would stop and people would give us food. By the end of the day we had collected ten pomegranates, three apples, two cucumbers, one rice pudding dessert, three bags full of pistachios, chocolate, four tangerines, special cookies from Kashmar and other cookies. We finally got a feel for Iranian hospitality. We stayed for free at a mosque in Bardeskan where we had our own room with a bed and could make use of a shared bathroom including shower. We were just preparing our dinner when we heard a knock on our door and a few locals who earlier showed us to this mosque gave us another box of cookies and invited us to their home for a tea. We declined with a bad conscience but we were keen on going to bed early as another long cycling day laid ahead.

Our room at the Red Crescent
Our room at the Red Crescent
The very basic facilities!
The very basic facilities!
...and climbing...
Slowly climbing,…
...and climbing...
…and climbing…
...and climbing...
…and climbing,…
...stopping for another important photo shoot
…stopping for another important photo shoot,…
...with some rolling landscape in between...
…with some rolling landscape in between…
...and finally and happily descending.
…and finally and happily descending.

DSCF0570

Our room at the mosque
Our room at the mosque
What's left from our donations
What’s left from our presents

Neue Kleider, neue Angewohnheiten – oder wie man sich im Iran eingewöhnt

Daten und Fakten für den Iran:

  • Viermal so groß wie Deutschland oder dreimal so groß wie Frankreich
  • 78 Millionen Einwohner
  • Laut Iran Journal finden im Iran die meisten Schönheitsoperationen der Welt statt. Und wir können das bestätigen: Noch nie haben wir so viele Männer und Frauen mit Pflastern auf den Nasen, Mundschutz oder aufgespritzten Lippen und Wangen gesehen.
  • Nachbarländer: Irak, Türkei, Aserbaidschan und Armenien (Westen und Nordwesten), Turkmenistan (Nord/Nordost), Afghanistan und Pakistan (Osten/Südosten).
  • Iran ist die Wiege einer der ältesten Zivilisationen beginnend mit den Elamitischen Staaten zwischen 3200 – 2800 v.Chr. Die iranischen Meder vereinten das Gebiet in das erste von vielen Imperien 625 v.Chr. und übernahmen die Führerschaft in der Region (Wikipedia).
435km and 2,767m altitude gain (3,211km and 27,414m altitude gain in total)
435km und 2,767m Höhenmeter (insgesamt 3.211km and 27.414m)

13. – 24. Oktober 2015 – Die iranischen Grenzkontrollen waren einfach. Im Niemandsland zog ich mich um, ersetzte kurze Hosen durch lange Hose, kurzes T-Shirt durch lange Tunika und wickelte einen beigen Schal um meinen Kopf. Unsere Visa wurden geprüft und gestempelt und anstelle unser Gepäck zu durchsuchen, hieß uns der zuständige Grenzbeamte im Land recht herzlich willkommen. Nach den letzten für uns sehr merkwürdigen Tagen in Turkmenistan freuten wir uns jetzt auf die iranische Gastfreundschaft, von der wir schon so viel gehört hatten. Aber erst mussten wir durch karge, abgeschiedene und menschenleere Landschaften radeln, bevor wir überhaupt eine Menschenseele treffen sollten. Am Ende dieses Tages hielten wir in einem kleinen heruntergekommenen Dorf, um uns um unseren Schlafplatz zu kümmern. Es dauerte eine geschlagene Stunde bis uns ein Ladenbesitzer einlud, in seinem stark nach Benzin riechenden Lagerraum zu übernachten.

New outfit and two faces that would follow us for the coming two months
Neues Outfit zum Radeln und zwei Gesichter, die uns die nächsten Wochen überall hin begleiten sollten.
On our first day in Iran we had to pass a pitch-dark tunnel. While there was not traffic at all before, several trucks passed me in the tunnel - tunnels are always the worst experiences wherever you are
Gleich am ersten Tag im Iran mussten wir einen stockdunklen Tunnel durchfahren. Und obwohl bisher die ganze Zeit überhaupt kein Verkehr war, wurde ich von mehreren LKWs im Tunnel überholt – Tunnel sind immer die schrecklichsten Erfahrungen, egal in welchem Land!
The barren landscape
Die karge Landschaft

Wir fuhren am nächsten Morgen früh weiter, noch immer den Geruch von Benzin in den Nasen. Der Verkehr hatte plötzlich stark zugenommen, da wir uns nun auf der wichtigsten Transitroute für LKWs zwischen Turkmenistan und der Türkei befanden. Nach den vielen ruhigen Straßen mussten wir uns erst wieder an viel Verkehr und Dieselgeruch gewöhnen. Unsere Ankunft in Quchan, unserer ersten Stadt im Iran, war sehr merkwürdig fühlte. Bisher hatten wir keine einzige Frau gesehen und plötzlich wimmelte es nur so von Frauen, eingehüllt in ihre schwarzen Chadors. Wir wurden angestarrt, ich glaube nicht, dass hier schon viele Touristen durchgekommen sind. Wann immer jemand des Englischen mächtig war, wurden wir angesprochen und immer wurde gefragt, ob wir irgendwelche Hilfe bräuchten. Ein freundliches Ehepaar half mir, ein neues Radoutfit zu kaufen und begleitete uns in viele verschiedenen Läden, bis ich etwas Passendes zum Radeln gefunden hatte. Auch in diesen farbenfrohen Kleidern fühlte ich mich noch ein wenig unwohl, aber die Iranerin meinte, ich müsse auf keinen Fall schwarz tragen wie all die anderen Frauen hier. Sie selbst würde das auch nur zur Arbeit und offiziellen Anlässen so handhaben. Das beruhigte mich erst einmal, da ich nicht unbedingt von der Moralpolizei wegen unsittlicher Garderobe verhaftet werden wollte.

At our first Iranian 'homestay'
Unser erster iranischer ‘Homestay’
Pretty cycling with pretty barren landscapes
Schönes Radeln bei schöner, schroffer Landschaft
Where is the black sheep?
Wo ist das schwarze Schaf oder ist es doch eine Ziege?
One of the first villages close to Quchan
Unser erstes Dorf in der Nähe von Quchan
Arriving in Quchan - a typical black religious banner
Ankunft in Quchan – mit einem typischen, schwarzen, religiösen Banner
A woman - finally! And a billboard with men that died in the Irak war. You will find these pictures at the entrance of every village and town in Iran.
Eine Frau – endlich! Und ein Plakat mit den Gesichtern von Männern, die während des Iran/Irak-Krieges gefallen sind. Diese Bilder sieht man überall am Ortseingang von Städten und Dörfern.

Mehr Schwierigkeiten hatte ich allerdings, mich an das Kopftuch zu gewöhnen und mehr als einmal rutschte es mir von den Haaren, was ich nur aufgrund des Grinsens der Leute um mich herum bemerkte. Diese Reaktion bestätigte mir dann auch, dass sich viele Iraner nicht darum scheren, wie Touristen gekleidet sind und ich fühlte mich dann auch gleich wohler. Und die Ganzkörperverhüllung hat auch ihre Vorteile: Sonnencreme brauchte ich nur noch für Gesicht und Hände, Bad-Hair-Days gehörten der Vergangenheit an und was noch viel besser war, meine Haare wurden nicht mehr so dreckig von den Abgasen, ich sparte also auch Haarshampoo. Außerdem setzte ich meinen Radhelm jetzt immer auf, da ansonsten der Schal weggeweht wäre.

Woran wir uns aber absolut nicht gewöhnen konnten war die plötzlich Zensur, und dass wir keinen freien Zugang zu Informationen mehr bekamen. Nicht nur Facebook und unsere Blog-Website waren für uns gesperrt, auch Nachrichtenseiten, die wir mehr als einmal besuchten, wurden automatisch blockiert. Das Internet war außerdem extrem langsam und funktionierte oft selbst in Großstädten überhaupt nicht. In diesem Land ist alles unter Regierungskontrolle.

My new outfit - over time you might notice that this is getting shorter and shorter as it would shrink with every washing :-(
Mein neues Outfit – ihr werdet im Laufe der Zeit merken, dass das Shirt immer kürzer wird, da es mit jedem Waschen mehr einlief 😦

Wir waren mittlerweile auf dem Weg in die iranische Wüste, mussten aber erst noch ein Paar Bergkämme überqueren. Bisher warteten wir vergeblich auf die so berühmte iranische Gastfreundschaft, denn wir stellten keine spürbare Veränderung gegenüber Zentral- oder Südostasien fest. Das sollte sich schnell ändern. Wir mühten uns gerade an einem Berg ab und zu unserer positiven Überraschung blies der kalte Wind mal von hinten. Oben angekommen, hielten wir an einer Polizeikontrolle und wurden mit heißem Tee begrüßt. Im nächsten Dorf, wo wir Mittagessen wollten, lud uns der Englischlehrer zu sich nach Hause ein, um bei ihm zu übernachten. Wir lehnten allerdings ab, da wir den Rückenwind ausnutzen wollten, der bei uns ja selten genug vorkommt. Die Landschaft hat uns sehr an Kirgisistan erinnert mit seinen rötlichen, rauen Bergen und der kargen Vegetation. Ungefähr zehn Kilometer vor Ankunft – es wurde schon leicht dämmrig – tauchte plötzlich ein Polizeiauto auf, eskortierte uns in die Stadt und organisierte uns sogar einen kostenlosen Schlafplatz bei einer Raststätte für LKW-Fahrer, wo wir zur Abwechslung mal wieder Kebab aßen.

Lunch break with fresh herbal tea and yummy sandwiches
Mittagspause mit frischem Kräutertee und leckeren Sandwiches – und der Versuch uns ans Essen auf dem Boden zu gewöhnen
Potato harvest - there is clearly no lack of workforce
Kartoffelernte – von Personalmangel kann hier nicht die Rede sein

DSCF0376

DSCF0380

DSCF0390

DSCF0399

With our host at the truck stop
Mit dem Restaurantbesitzer beim LKW-Rastplatz

In dieser Nacht regnete es heftig und wir waren froh, nicht im Zelt zu schlafen. Wir freuten uns jetzt auf unseren ersten richtigen Ruhetag in Sabzevar seit Langem, aber erst mussten wir mit müden Beinen und Johan etwas angeschlagen noch einen Pass hochstrampeln. Belohnt wurden wir wieder von tollem Wetter und atemberaubenden, kargen Landschaften. Nach dem Pass wurden die Straßen plötzlich voll und ich fühlte mich auf der engen Straße sehr unwohl, Johan schien das irgendwie gar nichts auszumachen. Unser Ruhetag in Sabzevar wurde zu einer Ruhewoche, da Johan sich eine Grippe eingefangen hatte und die meiste Zeit im Bett verbringen musste.

Coffee break right before the pass
Letzte Stärkung vor dem Pass – Kaffee und Kekse
At this point we thought it would now only go down - but another peak was waiting for us
Hier dachten wir, wir hätten es geschafft, aber eine weitere Steigung wartete um die Ecke

DSCF0438

DSCF0458

Arrival in Sabzevar
Ankunft in Sabzevar

Als wir dann endlich wieder weiterfahren konnten, regnete es. Wir fuhren trotzdem los, da wir es hier keinen Tag länger ausgehalten hätten. Zum Regen gesellte sich auch noch Gegenwind und so war der erste Tag nach einer Woche Ruhen sehr beschwerlich. Es regnete immer stärker und die Temperatur fiel drastisch. Gegen Mittag erreichten wir ein Dorf und beim Roten Halbmond, dem islamischen Pendant zum Roten Kreuz, fragten wir, ob wir uns aufwärmen und drinnen essen dürften. Natürlich durften wir das. Vier junge Männer in Uniformen begrüßten uns und setzten uns vor die Heizung. Natürlich durften wir auch nicht unser eigenes Essen auspacken, sondern aßen Dizi mit den Jungs nachdem der iranische Tisch gedeckt war –  eine Plastiktischdecke auf dem Boden. Weder Regen noch Wind ließen am Nachmittag nach und so wurden wir eingeladen, in den Räumlichkeiten des Roten Halbmonds zu übernachten, was wir gerne annahmen. Wir hatten beide nicht wirklich Lust, im Regen zu radeln und noch viel weniger Lust im Regen zu campen. Zufällig war dieser Tag auch der Beginn der zehn Tage andauernden Imam Hossain Passionsspiele und am späten Nachmittag kamen dann einige Dorfbewohner mit einer Englischlehrerin vorbei, um uns alle möglichen Fragen zu stellen. Unter anderem, ob wir denn Schwierigkeiten hätten, die iranischen Stehklos zu benutzen. Wir wurden eingeladen, an den Passionsspielen teilzunehmen. Mit dem Auto fuhren wir zur 200m entfernten Moschee. Dann wurden wir nach Männern und Frauen getrennt und ich ging mit der Englischlehrerin in die Frauenmoschee und wurde den bereits über 100 anwesenden Frauen vorgestellt, die in Reihen entlang der Wände eines riesigen Raumes saßen. Alle schauten mich neugierig an und wunderten sich wahrscheinlich, was ich Paradiesvogel in meinen bunten Kleidern unter den vielen schwarzen Gestalten wohl zu suchen hätte. Wir setzten uns dazu und dann wurde auch gleich wieder der Tisch ausgerollt und das Essen serviert: Brot mit Joghurt, Dizi, das ist eine fette Suppe, in die erst Brot eingetunkt wird und danach Hammelfleisch und Gemüse. Die Hauptattraktion war noch immer ich, alle starrten mich an, lächelten und freuten sich, dass ich dabei war. Nach einem kurzen Gebet einer Frau und der Antwort vom Rest der Frauen standen alle auf, umringten mich, um mit mir fotografiert zu werden und gingen dann nach Hause. Das Ganze dauerte nicht länger als eine Stunde und sollte danach noch ganze zehn Tage andauern. Ich war ein wenig enttäuscht, denn am Nachmittag sah ich im Fernsehen, wie sich Männer in schwarz bei einer Prozession selbst kasteiten und ich dachte, so etwas ähnliches würde hier auch passieren. Und bei Johan lief das Ganze ähnlich ab, wie er mir später erzählte.

Saffron
Safran – die Pflanze sieht aus wie Krokus
The two well-known guys again!
Drei Wohl-Bekannte

P1230333

Lunch at the Red Crescent
Mittagessen beim Roten Halbmond
Johan was welcomed by the local youngsters like a football star
Johan wurde von den Jugendlichen wie ein Fußballstar begrüßt

Nach einer etwas länger dauernden Fotosession fuhren wir am nächsten Morgen bei schönem, eisigen Wetter und mit Gegenwind los. Wir fuhren wieder einmal in Richtung Berge und es ging bis 15 Uhr bergauf. Danach liefen die verbleibenden 40km wie am Schnürchen – wir hatten starken Rückenwind und außerdem ging es nur noch bergab. Das war auch gut so, denn wir wollten unbedingt vor Einbruch der Dunkelheit in Bardaskan ankommen. An diesem Tag erhielten wir jedes Mal, wenn wir anhielten, etwas zu essen. Am Ende des Tage hatten wir zehn Granatäpfel, drei Äpfel, zwei Gurken, ein Reispudding-Dessert, drei volle Tüten mit Pistazien, Schokolade, vier Mandarinen, besondere Kekse aus Kashmar und weiter Kekse eingesammelt. So allmählich bekamen wir ein Gefühl für die iranische Gastfreundlichkeit. In Bardaskan bekamen wir ein Zimmer in der Moschee, wo wir auch die Gemeinschaftsduschen nutzen konnten. Als wir unser Abendessen vorbereiteten, klopfte es und die jungen Männer, die uns zuvor den Weg zur Moschee gezeigt hatten, brachten uns eine große Dose Kekse und luden uns zu sich nach Hause ein. Mit schlechtem Gewissen lehnten wir ab, denn wir wollten am nächsten Morgen früh aufstehen, da ein langer Tag vor uns lag.

Our room at the Red Crescent
Unser Zimmer beim Roten Halbmond
The very basic facilities!
Die sehr einfachen Container des Roten Halbmonds
...and climbing...
Langsam geht es nach oben,…
...and climbing...
…und nach oben…
...and climbing...
…und immer noch nach oben,…
...stopping for another important photo shoot
… wir halten für ein weiteres wichtiges Foto,…
...with some rolling landscape in between...
…genießen zwischendurch ein wenig Auf und Ab…
...and finally and happily descending.
…und freuen uns schließlich auf die lange Abfahrt.

DSCF0570

Our room at the mosque
Unser Zimmer in der Moschee
What's left from our donations
Ein Teil unserer Ausbeute

Night cycling, toilet seats and other surprises

30 September – 8 October, 2015 – After four days in Samarkand of which Johan spent almost two days in bed with a severe diarrhoea it was time to move on for the 270km- distance to Bukhara, another well-preserved Silk Road town. The first day passed uneventful on good and undulating roads, through a boring cotton field landscape and in the afternoon against the wind. The first night we stayed at a huge house with an Uzbek family and for the first time we successfully refused sweets and bread. And for the first time there was a bathroom – basic, but we could wash ourselves and go to sleep clean. The second day begun uneventful. At a monument we met a funny Korean guy who works for Korean Air at the huge International Airport we just passed. He walked with a golf club to protect himself from chasing dogs in the villages. We had a very funny conversation and could have talked much longer but we had to move on as it was already getting late and we had to look for a place to sleep.

Leaving Samarkand
Leaving Samarkand
Johan was getting concerned about being on the wrong road as he couldn't find Buxoro (which is Bukhara) on his map!
Johan was getting concerned about being on the wrong road as he couldn’t find Buxoro (which is Bukhara) on his map!
Boring landscape and headwinds
Boring landscape and headwinds
Lunchtime
Lunchtime

DSCF9991

DSCF9972

When the Korean asked where we would sleep at night when there are no hotels Johan replied that we would look for a nice house and ask if we could pitch our tent in their garden. The Korean's answer: "How can you find nice house, they all look the same?"
When the Korean asked where we would sleep at night when there are no hotels Johan replied that we would look for a nice house and ask if we could pitch our tent in their garden. The Korean’s answer: “How can you find nice house, they all look the same?”

DSCF9916

Cotton after cotton field
Cotton after cotton field

Which turned out to become a challenge. We dismissed the luxury 4-star-hotel on the way because we didn’t want to pay 60$. If we had had the second sight we would have just stayed and made use of a luxury stay. But we continued instead and stopped at a brand-new village to try to find a camp spot. We asked a few people but all refused and sent us away. One woman belonging to the local police asked 50$ to stay at her home but we also dismissed this ‘friendly’ offer and moved on to the next village. A few questions and a few more refusals later, one family finally invited us in. We showed them our instant noodle soup as we didn’t want them to cook for us – this time the place looked rather poor – and for the first time the whole family would join us for dinner. We of course would get our noodle soup but also had to eat their food – cabbage with saussages. All evening neighbours and more family members would pass by to say hello and at around 8pm we could go to sleep. About an hour later there was a knock on the door, our host came in repeating several times: “Palatka, you go, go!” Someone must have told the police about us and our hosts were getting into trouble. We quickly packed up our stuff and cycled in our pyjamas into the dark back to the very busy main highway. There was no way to pitch our palatka (tent) in the fields around us, that we knew from when we arrived here. We though remembered a small platform next to the highway and a house where we now wanted to ask to pitch our tent. As we couldn’t see anything, we cycled slowly on the shoulder against the traffic and reached that place after a few hundred meters that felt like kilometres. Unfortunately we were directly refused and couldn’t convince them to let us pitch the tent anywhere near the house. Instead, they sent us back to the expensive hotel. Grudgingly we moved to the right side of the road and cycled another five kilometres back to the hotel through the eerie darkness to where we’ve been a few hours ago, checked into a very nice, clean and luxury room with a soft bed, white bed sheets, soft pillows, and a perfectly working bathroom with white towels, a real shower, a sink and a Western-style toilet and still went to bed dirty at around 10:30pm. The shower had to wait until the next morning.

Family dinner
Family dinner

Given our blackmarket exchange rate we only had to pay 30$ for our hotel room including breakfast, as the hotel used the official exchange rate. After a long shower we raided the breakfast buffet. In fact Johan ate so much, that the toilet seat broke into 100 pieces when he sat on it later. Back in our room we also noticed that there wasn’t neither electricity nor water anymore – we once again had to use our headlights and drinking water for brushing our teeth. At the check-out I told the receptionist about the problems and all she replied was “Yes”. When I said that she didn’t even tell us about these issues, she again replied with “Yes”. Johan then told me that she doesn’t speak English and I gave up complaining. Five minutes later she approached us asking in perfect English for 25.000 Sum (5$) for the broken toilet seat! If it comes to getting money people suddenly know how to communicate. After a short discussion we left without paying the fine and reached Bukhara around lunch time. The following day was Johan’s birthday which we spent sightseeing in Central Asia’s holiest city with buildings spanning a thousand years of history. As per our travel guide Bukhara is one of the best places for a glimpse of pre-Russian Turkestan.

Village life
Village life
Refueling stop
Refueling stop
Beautiful remainder of the Soviet architecture
Beautiful remainder of the Soviet architecture
While we were having a short coffee break this family stepped out of their car, sat next to us to take pictures. The boy was nicely dressed up in a velvet suit.
While we were having a short coffee break this family stepped out of their car, sat next to us to take pictures. The boy was nicely dressed up in a velvet suit.

DSCF1095

And we reached another important Silk Road city
And we reached another important Silk Road city

Bukhara impressions:

A beautiful and - in the early morning only - peaceful square
One of the few surviving hauz (ponds) in Bukhara created in the 16th and 17th century which was in the past the principal source of water but also notorious for spreading disease.

DSCF1151

DSCF1157
Boobies alert

DSCF1182

Counting money in Uzbekistan takes a while

P1230246
Counting money takes a while in Uzbekistan – even if it’s not much

P1230248

DSCF1215

DSCF1227

DSCF1230

DSCF1233

DSCF1237

DSCF1273

A restaurant with a view
A restaurant with a view
The same restaurant's cooks and kitchen - according to our travel guide the best place in town
The same restaurant’s cooks and kitchen – according to our travel guide the best place in town

DSCF1289

DSCF1293

DSCF1294

DSCF1403

DSCF1432
At the gate of the Bukhara fortress Ark
The massive walls of the Bukhara fortress Ark
The massive walls of the Ark

DSCF1447

DSCF1490

Working at our 12-Dollars-per-night-including-breakfast guesthouse
Working at our 12-Dollars-per-night-including-breakfast guesthouse

DSCF1496

DSCF1706

Knowing that it would be unlikely for us to return to Uzbekistan we took a taxi to Khiva, 600km North of Bukhara. The Silk Road town is famous for its slave caravans, barbaric cruelty, terrible desert journeys and steppes infested with wild tribesmen. The town itself is like an open air museum with well preserved minarettes, medressas, mosques and boring museums and feels a bit like stepping into another era, if it wasn’t for the many tourist shops and cafés mainly catering for groups. We met Christian from France again and decided to have dinner together. We had met him first in Samarkand, he has been travelling through Central Asia from France with his 4WD car and was now on his way back home on more or less the same route as we were. Earlier that day we had made a reservation at the best restaurant in town and thought it wouldn’t be a problem to dine with one more person. We could not have been more wrong. It took us 15 minutes to convince the waiter that we would either eat all together or not at all at this place. We were almost about to leave when they finally agreed and angrily put a third chair at our table. After weeks of Laghman (noodle soup), Plov (fried rice) and Manty (dumplings filled with meat) we happily ordered hamburgers. Our mouths were watering by the thought of yummy juicy hamburgers American style. The bigger was our disappointment: two meat patties with some rice and mashed potatoes decorated with a leave of lettuce. We were bemused about our own naivity but enjoyed a nice evening with Christian. To our surpise we got a free dessert from the kitchen – maybe they understood that their earlier reaction wasn’t appropriate.

Khiva impressions:

DSCF1895

Winter is approaching
Winter is approaching

Looking for the right outfit 🙂

DSCF2149
The beautiful unfinished minaret which was supposed to become the highest minaret ever to be able to see Bukhara

DSCF2220

DSCF1992

DSCF1973

The next day we continued sightseeing in the morning and got annoyed by the poor service culture once more. We entered a café and the first question they asked us was “do you belong to a group?” Our usual answer, “Yes, we do, we are a group of two and sometimes even our group is too big!” didn’t amuse the waiters and we could see their disappointment. We got seated but nobody served us, despite us desperately trying to order coffee until finally a group arrived who got served immediately. Normally we would have left but as this was a place where Wifi reception was good and I had work-related emails to be sent we endured and stayed. We spent the afternoon in the taxi back to Bukhara to reunite with our bikes.

DSCF1929

DSCF1942

DSCF1966

DSCF2125

DSCF2196

DSCF1969

DSCF2240

DSCF2179 DSCF2206

It was once more time to leave the country as our Turkmen transit visas started on 9 October. With only five days to cross the country we wanted to make sure to pass the border as early as possible. We now had two days for the 100 km to get to the border and we only left Bukhara in the early afternoon, cycled until 5pm and pitched our tent in an apple orchard. That night we noticed that our matresses were deflating and by midnight we were both laying on the hard ground. Not a very good prospect as we had to cross the desert in Turkmenistan and would have to camp the coming days with no possibilities to repair the matresses. After a bad-night’s sleep we woke shattered and bad tempered as on top we were facing headwinds. By midday the wind was becoming a sand storm, the air was completely yellow and sandy, our sight very limited and the atmosphere eerie. We struggled to get to the border on time even though we had only a distance of around 60km to cover. But this time our delay turned to our favour as the customs officers wanted to go home and hardly checked our luggage and within 20 minutes we were officially checked out of Uzbekistan.

The Silk Road
The Silk Road

We had a lot of nice experiences and a few bad ones in Uzbekistan. Despite opening up for foreign tourism, the country is still a harshly governed police state. Nonetheless we felt genuinely welcome by people be it through their greetings when we cycled through villages, their gold-teethed smiles, their tea invitations, their children running or cycling happily with us, by those who invited us to stay at their homes and who shared their meals with us and of course by those who gave us fruit or bread when we cycled past. We were deeply impressed by the cities of Samarkand, Bukhara and Khiva with their fabulous architecture, positively surprised by the beautiful landscapes up until Samarkand and less impressed by the landscapes as from Samarkand dominated by vast deserts and cotton plantations. Dating back to Russian times – at least that’s what we assumed – the state administers itself to death. Our passport was stacked with little hotel slips, neatly filled in by the hotel managers, stamped and signed and when Johan got money from a bank he had to sign endless papers that were handed from one person to another, before they would retrieve the dollars.

Nacht-Radeln, Klobrillen und andere Überraschungen

30. September – 8. Oktober 2015 – Nach vier Tagen in Samarkand, von denen Johan fast die Hälfte der Zeit im Bett beziehungsweise auf der Toilette mit schlimmem Durchfall verbracht hat, machten wir uns wieder auf den Weg in die 270km entfernte Stadt Bukara, ein weiteres Highlight auf der Seidenstraße. Am ersten Tag passierte nicht wirklich viel, wir fuhren auf guten und leicht hügeligen Straßen an Baumwollfeldern entlang und am Nachmittag gegen den Wind. Wir übernachteten bei einer usbekischen Familie in einem riesigen Haus und zum ersten Mal gelang es uns, Brot und Süßigkeiten abzulehnen. Und zum ersten Mal gab es sogar ein Badezimmer – die Ausstattung war zwar sehr einfach, aber immerhin konnten wir uns waschen und sauber ins Bett gehen. Auch der zweite Tag begann unspannend. Die einzige Abwechslung war die Begegnung mit einem lustigen Südkoreaner, der am Internationalen Flughafen arbeitete, an dem wir gerade vorbeiradelten. Er war mit einem Golfschläger unterwegs, um die Hunde in den Dörfern abzuwehren. Wir hatten eine sehr lustige Unterhaltung und hätten ewig weiterreden können, mussten aber leider weiter, da es für uns an der Zeit war, uns um einen Schlafplatz zu kümmern.

Leaving Samarkand
Am Stadtrand von Samarkand
Johan was getting concerned about being on the wrong road as he couldn't find Buxoro (which is Bukhara) on his map!
Hier wurde Johan nervös, da er auf seiner Landkarte Buxoro (Bukara) nicht finden konnte und dachte, wir hätten uns verfahren!
Boring landscape and headwinds
Gegenwind bei eintöniger Landschaft
Lunchtime
Mittagessen

DSCF9991

DSCF9972

When the Korean asked where we would sleep at night when there are no hotels Johan replied that we would look for a nice house and ask if we could pitch our tent in their garden. The Korean's answer: "How can you find nice house, they all look the same?"
Als der Koreaner fragte, wo wir denn schlafen würden, wenn es kein Hotel gibt, meinte Johan, “wir suchen uns ein schönes Haus und fragen, ob wir im Garten unser Zelt aufschlagen dürfen.” Seine Antwort: “Wie findet ihr denn ein schönes Haus, die sehen hier doch alle gleich aus!”

DSCF9916

Cotton after cotton field
Baumwolle, Baumwolle und noch mehr Baumwolle

Die Suche nach einem Schlafplatz stellte sich allerdings als etwas schwieriger heraus als erwartet. Das 4-Sterne-Luxushotel, wo Zimmer 60 Dollar kosten, ließen wir links liegen. Könnten wir hellsehen, wären wir geblieben und hätten den Rest des Tages in Luxus gebadet. Anstelle fuhren wir weiter und hielten an einem Neubaudorf, um einen Zeltplatz zu finden. Leider schickten uns alle weiter außer einer älteren Frau, die bei der Polizei arbeitete und uns ein Zimmer in ihrem Haus für 50 Dollar anbot. Dieses allzu großzügige Angebot lehnten wir ab und fuhren ins nächste Dorf. Viele Fragen und fast ebenso viel Kopfschütteln später, lud uns eine Familie zu sich ein. Der Hausfrau übergaben wir unsere Tütensuppen, da wir nicht wollten, dass sie für uns kocht, da dieses Haus etwas ärmer aussah, und zum ersten Mal setzte sich die ganze Familie mit uns zum Essen an den Tisch. Wir bekamen auch unsere Nudelsuppe, mussten danach aber weiter mit der Familie essen. Dieses Mal gab es Kohl mit Würstchen. Im Laufe des Abends schaute der Rest der Familie und alle Nachbarn vorbei, um uns zu bestaunen und gegen 20 Uhr durften wir uns schlafen legen. In etwa eine Stunde später klopfte es plötzlich an der Tür, unser Gastgeber kam ins Zimmer und schrie aufgeregt: “Palatka, you go, go!”. Irgendjemand musste uns bei der Polizei verraten haben und die Familie bekam Schwierigkeiten. So schnell es ging packten wir unsere Siebensachen und radelten in unseren Schlafanzügen so schnell es ging in die Nacht in Richtung Schnellstraße. Unmöglich hätten wir unser Palatka (Zelt) hier in den Feldern aufschlagen können, das wussten wir vom Nachmittag. Wir erinnerten uns aber an eine kleine überdachte Plattform neben dem Schnellweg und da wollten wir hin. Da es wirklich stockdunkel war und wir absolut nichts sehen konnten, mussten wir mehrere Hundert Meter auf dem Standstreifen entgegen der Fahrtrichtung radeln. Leider ließ uns der Besitzer auch hier nicht zelten, da half kein Bitten und Betteln. Sie schickten uns zurück ins Hotel. Genervt schoben wir unsere Räder auf die richtige Fahrbahnseite und radelten die fünf Kilometer zurück zum Hotel durch die unheimliche Dunkelheit. Wir bekamen ein sehr schönes, sauberes und luxuriöses Zimmer mit weichen Betten, weißen Bettlaken, weichen Kissen und einem funktionierenden Badezimmer mit weißen Handtüchern, einer richtigen Dusche, einem Waschbecken und einem Klo, wie wir es gewohnt sind. Trotzdem gingen wir ungeduscht gegen 22:30 Uhr schlafen, das konnte bis zum nächsten Morgen warten.

Family dinner
Abendessen mit der ganzen Familie

Zu unserer großen Freude konnten wir unser Hotelzimmer in usbekischen Sum bezahlen und so zahlten wir aufgrund unserer sehr guten Tauschkurses nur 30 Dollar. Nach einer ausgiebigen Dusche plünderten wir das Frühstücksbuffet. Johan aß in der Tat so viel, dass später die Klobrille in Tausend Teile zerbrach. Und nicht nur das, nach dem Frühstück hatten wir plötzlich weder Strom noch Wasser und wir mussten uns die Zähne wieder einmal bei Stirnlampenlicht und mit unserem eigenen Wasser putzen. Beim Auschecken beschwerte ich mich und die Rezeptionistin beantwortete alle meiner Kommentare nur mit “Yes”. Johan meinte dann nur, dass sie kein Wort Englisch spräche und ich gab schließlich auf. Fünf Minuten später kam sie plötzlich auf uns zugerannt und forderte in perfektem Englisch 25.000 Sum (5$) von uns für die kaputte Klobrille. Wenn’s um’s Geldeintreiben geht, klappt es auf einmal mit dem Englischen. Nach einer kurzen Diskussion machten wir uns dann auf den Weg, ohne zu bezahlen. Gegen Mittag erreichten wir dann Bukara. Johans Geburtstag verbrachten wir in Zentralasiens heiligster Stadt mit Gebäuden, die auf eine 1000-jährige Geschichte zurückblicken. Laut Reiseführer ist die Stadt auch eine der Besten, um eine Vorstellung vom vorrussischen Turkestan zu bekommen.

Village life
Dorfleben
Refueling stop
Nachschub
Beautiful remainder of the Soviet architecture
Wunderbares Überbleibsel sowjetischer Architektur
While we were having a short coffee break this family stepped out of their car, sat next to us to take pictures. The boy was nicely dressed up in a velvet suit.
Während einer kurzen Kaffeepause kam diese Familie an, setzte sich zu uns und machte Fotos. Der Junge hatte einen schicken Samtanzug an.

DSCF1095

And we reached another important Silk Road city
Eine weitere Stadt an der Seidenstraße

Eindrücke von Bukara: 

A beautiful and - in the early morning only - peaceful square
Einer der wenigen Teiche, die in Bukara überlebt haben. Sie wurden im 16. und 17. Jahrhundert gebaut und waren in der Vergangenheit die einzige Wasserquelle und verantwortlich für die schnelle Ausbreitung von Krankheiten.

DSCF1151

DSCF1157
Atombusen-Alarm

DSCF1182

Counting money in Uzbekistan takes a while

P1230246
Geld zählen ist eine langwierige Angelegenheit in Usbekistan – auch wenn’s ganz wenig ist

P1230248

DSCF1215

DSCF1227

DSCF1230

DSCF1233

DSCF1237

DSCF1273

A restaurant with a view
Restaurant mit Ausblick
The same restaurant's cooks and kitchen - according to our travel guide the best place in town
Köche und Küche im selben Restaurant – laut Reiseführer das Beste vor Ort

DSCF1289

DSCF1293

DSCF1294

DSCF1403

DSCF1432
Am Tor der Festung Ark
The massive walls of the Bukhara fortress Ark
Die riesigen Schutzwälle der Festung

DSCF1447

DSCF1490

Working at our 12-Dollars-per-night-including-breakfast guesthouse
Arbeit in der 12-Dollar-pro-Nacht-inklusive-Frühstück-Pension

DSCF1496

DSCF1706

Da wir nicht davon ausgingen, irgendwann in naher Zukunft nach Usbekistan zurückzukehren, fuhren wir mit dem Taxi in das 600km entfernte Kiva im Norden Bukaras. Diese Stadt an der Seidenstraße ist berühmt-berüchtigt für ihre Sklavenkaravanen, barbarischen Grausamkeiten, schrecklichen Wüstenreisen und Steppen, die von wilden Stammesangehörigen heimgesucht werden. Für uns war die Stadt wie ein Freilichtmuseum mit gut erhaltenen Minaretten, Medressen, Moscheen und langweiligen Museen und wir kamen uns ein bisschen vor, als wären wir in ein anderes Jahrhundert eingetaucht, wenn da nicht die vielen Souvenirläden und Cafes gewesen wären. Hier haben wir auch Christian aus Frankreich wiedergetroffen und verabredeten uns zum Abendessen. Er ist mit seinem Geländewagen von Frankreich aus bis Zentralasien gefahren und war nun mehr oder weniger auf derselben Route unterwegs wie wir. Am Vormittag hatten wir einen Tisch im besten Restaurant am Platz gebucht und dachten, dass es sicherlich kein Problem sei, zu dritt aufzutauchen. Wir sollten uns täuschen. Es dauerte geschlagene 15 Minuten, bis der Kellner schließlich nachgab und verärgert einen dritten Stuhl an unseren Tisch stellte. Nach Wochen kulinarischer Entbehrungen und der Einnahme von Laghman (Nudelsuppe), Plov (gebratener Reis) und Manty (mit Fleisch gefüllte Knödel) bestellten wir Hamburger. Schon beim Gedanken daran lief uns das Wasser im Mund zusammen. Umso größer war unsere Enttäuschung als unsere Teller ankamen, auf denen je zwei Frikadellen, Reis, Kartoffelpüree und ein Salatblatt lagen. Schmunzelnd über unsere eigene Naivität verbrachten wir einen netten Abend mit Christian. Und zu unser aller Überraschung bekamen wir ein Dessert auf’s Haus – wahrscheinlich wurde dem Personal bewusst, dass sie sich nicht wirklich korrekt verhalten hatten.

Eindrücke von Kiva:

DSCF1895

Winter is approaching
Der Winter ist im Anmarsch

Johan sucht nach dem richtigen Outfit 🙂

DSCF2149
Das wunderschöne unfertige Minarett, das eigentlich das höchste der Welt werden sollte, damit der Sultan Bukara sehen kann

DSCF2220

DSCF1992

DSCF1973

Am nächsten Morgen schlenderten wir noch ein wenig durch die Stadt und ärgerten uns ein weiteres Mal über die nicht vorhandene Service-Kultur. Wir gingen in ein Cafe und die erste Frage, die uns entgegensprang war: “Gehören Sie zu einer Gruppe?”. Unsere übliche Antwort “Ja, unsere Gruppe besteht aus genau zwei Personen und selbst diese Gruppe ist manchmal zu groß,” fand der Kellner nicht wirklich lustig. Ganz im Gegenteil: Die Enttäuschung stand ihm ins Gesicht geschrieben. Wir durften uns an einen Tisch setzen, wurden aber nicht bedient, obwohl wir mehrfach versuchten, Kaffee zu bestellen. Eine Gruppe, die kurz nach uns ankam, wurde sofort bedient. Normalerweise wären wir spätestens jetzt aufgestanden und gegangen, aber da es hier die einzig funktionierende WLan-Verbindung kam, rissen wir uns zusammen und blieben, denn ich musste noch dringend ein Paar wichtige E-Mails verschicken. Den Nachmittag verbrachten wir dann wieder im Taxi auf dem langen Rückweg nach Bukara, um uns wieder zu unseren Rädern zu gesellen.

DSCF1929

DSCF1942

DSCF1966

DSCF2125

DSCF2196

DSCF1969