Steep mountains, abundant castles and unrivaled hospitality

587 km and altitude gain of 1907m (7,503 km and altitude gain of 47,110 m in total)
587 km and altitude gain of 1907m (7,503 km and altitude gain of 47,110 m in total)
xx km and xx meters altitude gain (xx km and altitude gain of xx m in total)
102 km and 421 meters altitude gain (7,605 km and altitude gain of 47,531 m in total)

19 January – 13 February, 2016 – We left Nizwa in the late morning and shortly afterwards we also left the highway to cycle through small villages and old abandoned villages. Every Omani gets a plot of land in the village they grew up and they usually rather build a new house than keep an old one. A very unfortunate development we noticed everywhere, people don’t really appreciate the old if it comes to objects. It’s the contrary if it comes to people. Grown and married children continue living with their parents and most houses are full of life with several generations living under one roof. The younger ones take care of the elderly, grandparents take care of their grandchildren and everybody seems to be happy this way. Parents are well respected and always have the last word. We once got invited by an Omani to his old house and he mentioned that he had built a new one but cannot live in it, because his father doesn’t want to move.

DSCF9897

Old and new
Old and new
A fertile oasis
A fertile oasis
From dawn till dusk
From dawn till dusk
DSCF9936
A peaceful camp spot…
and some very welcome visitors eating our food scraps
…and some very welcome visitors eating our food scraps

P1250034

P1250042

Our next longer stop was Al Hamra, a town consisting of many different villages. On day one we walked through a seven kilometer long wadi on an ever winding road with spectacular canyon views to a lonely village consisting of a few houses. The next day we cycled up to Jabal Shams, the highest road in Oman at around 2,000m with a dramatic vista of a 1,000-meter-deep canyon called the Grand Canyon. From there we could see the tiny houses of the village we walked to the day before. It took us six hours for an amazing and mind-blowing 40km-cycle up the stunning mountains and even without luggage we had to walk our bikes several times. Oman has unbelievably steep roads.

A beautiful walk through a wadi: 

DSCF0060

DSCF0066 DSCF0077 DSCF0090 DSCF0119 DSCF0127 DSCF0141 DSCF0164

P1250070 DSCF0229 DSCF0233 DSCF0277

Cycling up the highest road in Oman: 
DSCF0318 DSCF0326 DSCF0346 P1250079 P1250092 DSCF0384 DSCF0428 DSCF0438 DSCF0457 DSCF0469 DSCF0486 DSCF0497

DSCF0529
Friendly Omanis helping us out with water on these steep slopes

DSCF0537

DSCF0515P1250101 P1250105 P1250113 P1250124 P1250141DSCF0563 DSCF0577 DSCF0610 DSCF0629 DSCF0647 DSCF0653 DSCF0685 DSCF0690 DSCF0711 DSCF0716 DSCF0722 DSCF0745 DSCF0761 DSCF0778 DSCF0814

With our host in Al Hamra
With our host in Al Hamra

After a day’s rest we continued our journey along the mountain range, enjoyed Omani and Western hospitality through Warm Showers (an organization of people offering a place to sleep, to shower and often as well to eat for free), visited beautiful forts and castles along the way and two Unecso World heritage sites. The latter were tombs from about 2000 years ago, where one would assume that there are signs, entrance fees or at least a few explanatory signs. The first sight was already difficult to find as there were no sign posts at all. Once we had found it, we could just climb up the hill and look at the beehive tombs. The second site was even more difficult to find, we only noticed it because of a tiny brown sign stating that this was an archaeological site. Very bizarre!

Bahla
Bahla

At the Bahla fort – a Unesco World Heritage site: 

DSCF0861 DSCF0910 DSCF0931 DSCF0955 P1250165

P1250177

With our Warm Showers host in Bahla where we stayed several days
With our Warm Showers host in Bahla with whom we stayed several days
Sightseeing around Bahla
Sightseeing around Bahla
Bahia at sunset
Bahla at sunset
The new computer shop of our host
The new computer shop of our host

DSCF1027

The shared kitchen at our host's house - we had a room at his old house where his staff lives
The shared kitchen at our host’s house – we had a room at his old house where his staff lives
Enjoying a cuppa in the sun
Enjoying a cuppa in the sun

More sightseeing in and around Bahla:

These guys look friendlier than they were - they started throwing stones at us when Johan took their picture
These guys look friendlier than they were – they started throwing stones at us when Johan took their picture

DSCF1111 DSCF1123 DSCF1166

Jabreen castle – another World Heritage Site:

DSCF1356 DSCF1185 DSCF1371 DSCF1462

On the way to Al Ayn and Bat to see the beehive tombs:

P1250184
In the end we did not choose this road as we were afraid it was too remote and too difficult to cycle – instead we returned.
Lunch break
Lunch break at a mosque

DSCF1639 DSCF1689 DSCF1767

P1250181

Two nice Belgian cyclists we met several times on the road
Two nice Belgian cyclists we met several times on the road

P1250194 P1250198

DSCF1921

P1250207

The beehive tombs - more than 2000 years old!
The beehive tombs – more than 2000 years old!

DSCF1998

P1250218

P1250243 P1250240

DSCF2209

DSCF1809

P1250244

With our wonderful Warm Showers host Catherine in Ibri
With our wonderful Warm Showers host Catherine in Ibri
When we left Ibri we met the guy with the glasses in his fancy sports car who desperately wanted to invite us to demonstrate Omani hospitality - we spent a nice hour with his and a big part of his very big family
When we left Ibri we met the guy with the glasses on the right in his fancy sports car who desperately wanted to invite us to demonstrate Omani hospitality – we spent a nice hour with him and part of his very big family

Having visited many historical sites and having enjoyed the luxury of staying at houses it was time for us to cross the mountain range back to Sohar at the coast, go camping again and make use of the many free wilderness campsites along the way. In Sohar we finally met Salim again, who invited us to a delicious fish meal at the fish market. This time we had to say our final goodbyes to another great Omani we had met on the road.

Sultan Quaboos, the well respected head of Oman
Sultan Quaboos, the well-respected head of Oman
P1250260
‘Wadi Al Arshi’ – interesting naming, especially if you are German-speaking

DSCF2444 DSCF2475

Back at the park in Sohar again
Back at the park in Sohar again
P1250319
Can’t get any better….

P1250263 P1250292 P1250306 P1250307 P1250314 P1250315

Now we wanted to visit Musandam at the tip of the Arabian peninsula, a remote and rugged part of Oman separated from the rest of the country by the UAE. Cycling there was impossible for us as we couldn’t leave Oman and re-enter the same day on one visa as immigration laws require a gap of at least 30 days in between. For us the only way to get there was to take the bi-weekly ferry to Khasab. While looking for the cheapest ferry option we noticed, that there were Omani Warm Shower hosts close to the harbor about 60km north of Sohar. Happily we cycled along the coast, stopped at a gift shop to buy some chocolate for our soon-to-be-hosts and were welcomed by Khalid, shown into our room, got a delicious lunch served before we were left alone to be able to rest. Hospitality at its best! Khalid, his friends and family spoilt us the coming days and we started to feel heavily embarrassed for all their goodness and generosity. We went sightseeing in the area, each day accompanied by some other friends of the family, they paid for our ferry tickets even though we tried everything to pay ourselves, and to our biggest embarrassment we noticed that they had even paid for first class tickets. And as if that wasn’t enough after a full board accommodation and other treats we got more presents the evening before our departure: Johan a T-shirt and a scarf and I an Omani dress (which I left behind for practical reasons).

Leaving Sohar
Leaving Sohar

DSCF2511

With our Warm Showers hosts in Shinaz: 

P1250325
With Omar

P1250355 P1250359 P1250361 P1250374 P1250396

DSCF2565
Khalid’s friends, Hashim and Ibrahim
DSCF2582
My new outfit I decided to leave behind even though all Omanis thought it to be so beautiful on me 🙂
DSCF2584
Khalid and Ibrahim
DSCF2593
Ibrahim (on the right) and his nephew cycled with us to the ferry. When I told him that he was wearing a nice shirt he immediately took it off to give it to Johan – there was no way we could refuse this gift!

After a 4-hour ferry journey we disembarked in Khasab and pitched our tent at the huge beach just outside of town where we spent a full week. We made friends with another German couple ‘residing’ there as well in their camper van. We discovered the area by bike and by boat, watched dolphins during our little cruise around the peninsula and saw a stingray swimming along the full length of our beach. Every evening at around 5pm between 20 and 50 small speed boats left the harbor – Iranian smugglers who had to leave Oman before  nightfall. During the day we could see small trucks with all kinds of goods arriving at the harbor and we knew they were destined for Iran. Furthermore we collected shells, enjoyed the sea, built a fence around our home, got annoyed with people being noisy in the middle of the night, got even more annoyed with people throwing garbage carelessly on the beach, smiled at the thousands of cruise tourists arriving almost every other day with their huge cruise boats and just enjoyed our last days in beautiful Oman.

DSCF2641
First class to Khasab
DSCF2661
Our home for a week

DSCF2679

Dolphin watching cruise
Dolphin watching cruise

DSCF2893 DSCF2934 DSCF2941

DSCF3076
Last coffee with our new German friends Andrea und Lutz and another German who had just passed by
DSCF3114
Our fenced area – one day a few Omanis stopped next to our fence, talked with Johan and – when entering ‘our’ area, they were taking off their shoes. Hilarious!
P1250431
Bad hair day! But what can you expect after days without a shower 😉
P1250449
On our way to a beautiful viewpoint
Arrived and worth all the sweating up the once more very steep road
Arrived and worth all the sweating up the once more very steep road
Well deserved lunch break
Well deserved lunch break
One late afternoon a group of motor club sportscars showed up to have a fun afternoon in Oman
One late afternoon a group of people from a UAE motor club showed up in their sports cars to have a fun afternoon in Oman

 

Steile Berge, unzählige Burgen und einzigartige Gastfreundschaft

587 km and altitude gain of 1907m (7,503 km and altitude gain of 47,110 m in total)
587 km und 1.907 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 7.503 km und 47.110 Höhenmeter)
xx km and xx meters altitude gain (xx km and altitude gain of xx m in total)
102 km und 421 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 7.605 km und 47.531 Höhenmeter)

19. Januar – 13. Februar 2016 – Am späten Vormittag verließen wir Nizwa und kurz darauf auch den Highway, um durch kleine und alte, oft verlassene Dörfer zu radeln. Jeder Omani bekommt vom Staat ein Stück Land und zwar genau dort, wo er oder sie aufgewachsen ist. Meist bauen sie sich dann ein neues Haus, da das einfacher ist, als ein altes zu renovieren. Wir fanden das sehr schade, da uns die alten Häuser deutlich besser gefielen als die Neuen. Im Oman wird Altes leider nicht so sehr wertgeschätzt. Das verhält sich allerdings ganz anders, wenn es um Menschen geht. Verheiratete Paare leben meist weiter gemeinsam mit ihren Eltern im selben Haus und die Häuser sind immer voller Leben, da mehrere Generationen unter einem Dach leben. Die jüngeren Bewohner kümmern sich um die Älteren und Gebrechlichen, die Großeltern kümmern sich um ihre Enkel und alle scheinen damit glücklich zu sein. Die Eltern werden immer sehr respektvoll behandelt und haben meist auch das letzte Wort. In Ibri wurden wir von einem Omani in sein altes Haus eingeladen. Er erzählte uns, dass er bereits ein neues Haus gebaut habe, aber nicht umziehen könne, da sein Vater dies nicht wolle.

DSCF9897

Old and new
Alt und neu
A fertile oasis
Eine fruchtbare Oase
From dawn till dusk
Vom Morgengrauen bis zur Abenddämmerung
DSCF9936
Ein friedvoller Zeltplatz…
and some very welcome visitors eating our food scraps
.. und willkommene Besucher, die unseren Biomüll genüsslich verputzen.

P1250034

P1250042

In Al Hamra stoppten wir wieder für einige Tage, einer Stadt, die aus vielen verschiedenen Dörfern besteht. An einem Tag wanderten wir durch ein sieben Kilometer langes Wadi auf einer sich windenden Schotterstraße mit spektakulären Canyons zu einem einsamen Dorf, das aus nur wenigen Häusern bestand. Am nächsten Tag radelten wir dann auf den Berg Jabal Shams auf der höchsten Straße Omans auf etwa 2.000 m ü.M. mit dramatischen Aussichten in den 1.000m tiefen Canyon, durch den wir tags zuvor gewandert sind und wir konnten sogar das Dorf sehen. Wir brauchten für die traumhafte 40km-lange Strecke satte sechs Stunden und das ohne Gepäck. Teilweise waren die Steigungen so steil, dass wir sogar ohne Gepäck schieben mussten. Oman ist bisher das Land mit den steilsten Straßen!

Eine herrliche Wanderung durch ein Wadi: 

DSCF0060

DSCF0066 DSCF0077 DSCF0090 DSCF0119 DSCF0127 DSCF0141 DSCF0164

P1250070 DSCF0229 DSCF0233 DSCF0277

Radelnderweise auf der höchsten Straße Omans: 
DSCF0318 DSCF0326 DSCF0346 P1250079 P1250092 DSCF0384 DSCF0428 DSCF0438 DSCF0457 DSCF0469 DSCF0486 DSCF0497

DSCF0529
Freundliche Omanis, die uns auf diesen steilen Straßen mit Wasser aushelfen

DSCF0537

DSCF0515P1250101 P1250105 P1250113 P1250124 P1250141DSCF0563 DSCF0577 DSCF0610 DSCF0629 DSCF0647 DSCF0653 DSCF0685 DSCF0690 DSCF0711 DSCF0716 DSCF0722 DSCF0745 DSCF0761 DSCF0778 DSCF0814

With our host in Al Hamra
Mit unserem Gastgeber in Al Hamra

Nach einem weiteren Tag Ruhepause ging es entlang der Berge weiter. Wir nutzen mehrfach das Warm Showers Netzwerk (eine Organisation von Menschen, die Reiseradlern ein Bett, eine warme Dusche und oft auch Essen umsonst anbietet), besuchten Festungen und Burgen und noch mehr Unesco Weltkulturdenkmäler. Bei den Letzteren handelte es sich um 2000 Jahre alte Gräber. Man sollte annehmen, dass solche Stätten gut ausgeschildert sind oder dass es zumindest an den Denkmälern irgendwelche Hinweistafeln, Eintrittsgebühren oder Ähnliches gibt. Doch dem war nicht so. Nachdem wir die ersten Grabmäler mit Mühe und Not gefunden hatten, führte nur ein kleiner schmaler Weg zu den Gräbern. Die zweite Gedenkstätte fanden wir rein zufällig, da wir auf der anderen Straßenseite ein kleines braunes Schild sahen mit dem Hinweis auf archäologische Ausgrabungen. Das war alles schon sehr merkwürdig!

Bahla
Bahla

Die Festung in Bahla – auch ein Unesco Weltkulturerbe: 

DSCF0861 DSCF0910 DSCF0931 DSCF0955 P1250165

P1250177

With our Warm Showers host in Bahla where we stayed several days
Mit unserem Warm Showers Gastgeber in Bahla, bei dem wir mehrere Tage blieben
Sightseeing around Bahla
Besichtigungen in und um Bahla
Bahia at sunset
Bahla bei Sonnenuntergang
The new computer shop of our host
Der neue Computerladen unseres Gastgebers

DSCF1027

The shared kitchen at our host's house - we had a room at his old house where his staff lives
In der Küche bei unserem Gastgeber – wir bekamen ein Zimmer in seinem alten Haus, in dem auch seine Mitarbeiter wohnten
Enjoying a cuppa in the sun
Ein Tässchen Kaffee in der noch nicht zu warmen Morgensonne

Noch mehr Besichtigungen in und um Bahla:

These guys look friendlier than they were - they started throwing stones at us when Johan took their picture
Diese Jungs sehen freundlicher aus als sie tatsächlich waren – nachdem Johan sie fotografierte schmissen sie mit Steinen nach uns

DSCF1111 DSCF1123 DSCF1166

Kastell Jabreen – auch ein Weltkulturerbe:

DSCF1356 DSCF1185 DSCF1371 DSCF1462

Auf dem Weg nach Al Ayn und Bat, um die sogenannten ‘Bienenstockgräber’ zu besichtigen: 

P1250184
Am Ende sind wir hier dann doch nicht hochgefahren, da wir Angst hatten, dass diese Straße zu steil wird und zu abgelegen ist.
Lunch break
Mittagspause im Schatten einer Moschee

DSCF1639 DSCF1689 DSCF1767

P1250181

Two nice Belgian cyclists we met several times on the road
Zwei nette Belgier, die wir mehrfach unterwegs trafen

P1250194 P1250198

DSCF1921

P1250207

The beehive tombs - more than 2000 years old!
Die mehr als 2000 Jahre alten Bienenstockgräber

DSCF1998

P1250218

P1250243 P1250240

DSCF2209

DSCF1809

P1250244

With our wonderful Warm Showers host Catherine in Ibri
Mit Catherine, unserer super netten Warm Showers Gastgeberin in Ibri
When we left Ibri we met the guy with the glasses in his fancy sports car who desperately wanted to invite us to demonstrate Omani hospitality - we spent a nice hour with his and a big part of his very big family
Als wir dann von Ibri aufbrachen, haben wir diesen Omani mit Brille (rechts) in seinem Sportwagen getroffen, der uns unbedingt zu sich nach Hause einladen wollte, um uns die omanische Gastfreundschaft zu zeigen – wir verbrachten eine gute Stunde mit ihm und seiner großen Familie

Nachdem wir nun viele historische Stätten besucht und den Luxus genossen hatten, in Häusern zu übernachten, war es an der Zeit, die Berge zu überqueren und wieder zurück nach Sohar an der Küste zu radeln. Jetzt hieß es wieder zelten und die vielen wilden Zeltplätze auf dem Weg zu nutzen. In Sohar trafen wir dann auch wieder Salim, der uns abends zu einem leckeren Fischessen auf dem Fischmarkt einlud. Dieses Mal mussten wir nun wirklich von Salim Abschied nehmen, da uns unsere Wege nicht mehr kreuzen würden.

Sultan Quaboos, the well respected head of Oman
Sultan Quaboos, das sehr angesehene Oberhaupt Omans
P1250260
‘Wadi Al Arshi’ – für uns Deutsche doch ein eher lustiger Ortsname

DSCF2444 DSCF2475

Back at the park in Sohar again
Zurück im Park von Sohar
P1250319
Viel besser kann’s kaum werden….

P1250263 P1250292 P1250306 P1250307 P1250314 P1250315

Jetzt wollten wir Musandam an der Spitze der arabischen Halbinsel besuchen, ein sehr schroffes und abgelegenes Gebiet Omans, das außerdem vom restlichen Oman abgeschnitten ist, da die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate dazwischen liegen. Leider konnten wir dorthin nicht radeln, denn wir hätten dann wieder 30 Tage warten müssen, bis wir ein neues Visum für den Oman bekommen hätten. Um das zu umgehen gibt es aber zweimal die Woche eine Fähre nach Khasab. Als wir uns nach den Optionen erkundigten, fiel uns auf, dass es am nächstgelegenen Hafen sogar Warm Showers Gastgeber gab. Was für ein Zufall. Freudiger Erwartung radelten wir die 60km von Sohar in Richtung Norden, kauften Schokolade für unsere Gastgeber und wurden am frühen Nachmittag von Khalid in Empfang genommen. Er zeigte uns unser Zimmer, in dem wir auch unsere Räder parkten, servierte unser Mittagessen und ließ uns dann den restlichen Nachmittag ausruhen. Das nenne ich Gastfreundschaft vom Feinsten! Khalid, seine Freunde und seine Familie verwöhnten uns die nächsten Tage und wir fühlten uns fast peinlich berührt von dieser Güte und Großzügigkeit. Gemeinsam schauten wir uns die Gegend an, jeden Tag wurden wir von irgendwelchen Freunden der Familie begleitet, sie bezahlten sogar unsere Fährtickets obwohl wir heftigst dagegen protestierten. Zu unserer größten Überraschung bekamen wir dann sogar 1. Klasse-Tickets. Und als ob das alles nicht schon mehr als genug gewesen wäre bekamen wir zum Abschied auch noch Geschenke: Johan ein T-Shirt und einen Schal und ich ein Omani-Kleid (das ich allerdings aus nachvollziehbaren Gründen zurückgelassen habe).

Leaving Sohar
Auf dem Weg nach Shinas

DSCF2511

Mit unseren Warm Showers Gastgebern in Shinas: 

P1250325
Mit Omar

P1250355 P1250359 P1250361 P1250374 P1250396

DSCF2565
Khalids Freunde, Hashim und Ibrahim
DSCF2582
Mein neues Outfit, das ich dann doch zurückgelassen habe, obwohl alle Omanis das so schön fanden 🙂
DSCF2584
Khalid und Ibrahim
DSCF2593
Ibrahim (rechts) und sein Neffe radelten mit uns zur Fähre. Als ich Ibrahim sagte, dass mir sein T-Shirt gefiel, zog er es sofort aus und gab es Johan und alle Proteste halfen nichts, Johan musste es behalten.

Nach einer ungefähr vierstündigen Fährfahrt kamen wir in Khasab an und stellten unser Zelt am riesigen Strand außerhalb der Stadt auf und blieben dort eine ganze Woche lang. Wir befreundeten uns mit einem anderen deutschen Pärchen, das ebenfalls mit seinem Campervan am Strand residierte. Wir entdeckten Musandam per Rad und mit dem Boot und beobachteten Delphine auf unserer kleinen Bootsrundfahrt um die Halbinsel. Wir sahen einen wunderschönen Stachelrochen, der den ganzen Strand entlang schwamm. Abends gegen 17 Uhr verließen immer zwischen 20 und 50 Schnellboote den Hafen – das waren die iranischen Schmuggler, die vor Einbruch der Dunkelheit den Oman wieder verlassen mussten. Tagsüber sahen wir viele kleine LKWs mit täglich unterschiedlichen Waren in den Hafen einfahren und wir wussten, dass diese für den Iran bestimmt waren. Außerdem sammelten wir Muscheln, genossen Abkühlungen im Meer, bauten einen Zaun um unser Zelt, waren genervt von Leuten, die sich mitten in der Nacht lärmend am Strand aufhielten oder waren noch genervter von denjenigen, die ihren Müll einfach am Strand liegen ließen. Wir belächelten Tausende von Kreuzfahrttouristen, die fast täglich mit den riesigen Kreuzfahrtschiffen ankamen und genossen unsere letzten Tage im Oman.

DSCF2641
1. Klasse nach Khasab
DSCF2661
Unser Zuhause für eine Woche

DSCF2679

Dolphin watching cruise
Bootsfahrt, um Delphine zu beobachten

DSCF2893 DSCF2934 DSCF2941

DSCF3076
Eine letzte Tasse Kaffee mit unseren neuen deutschen Freunden Andrea und Lutz und einem weiteren Deutschen, der gerade vorbeikam
DSCF3114
Unser eingezäunter Bereich – an einem Tag hielten ein Paar Omanis neben unserem Zaun, sprachen kurz mit Johan und als sie dann in ‘unseren’ Bereich eintraten, zogen sie doch tatsächlich die Schuhe aus :-). Fantastisch!
P1250431
Bad hair day! Aber was kann man auch erwarten nach Tagen am Meer ohne Dusche…
P1250449
Auf dem Weg zu einem herrlichen Aussichtspunkt
Arrived and worth all the sweating up the once more very steep road
Da ist er auch schon und jeden Tropfen Schweiß wert, den wir auf dem Weg nach oben verloren haben
Well deserved lunch break
Wohlverdientes Mittagessen
One late afternoon a group of motor club sportscars showed up to have a fun afternoon in Oman
Eines späten Nachmittags kam eine Gruppe eines Motorsportclubs mit ihren Sportwagen aus den VAE an, um sich hier am Strand zu amüsieren.

 

Von Schiras bis an den Persischen Golf

309km, 1,636 m altitude gain (4,578km and 33,988m altitude gain in total)
309km, 1.636 Höhenmeter (4.578km und 33.988m Höhenmeter insgesamt)

12. – 24. November 2015 – In Schiras wollten wir uns nochmals selbst verwöhnen und gönnten uns ein etwas besseres Hotel, um uns zu erholen und auf die letzte Etappe im Iran vorzubereiten. Im Hotel angekommen – einem alten traditionellen Gebäude, das um einen Innenhof herum gebaut ist – verhandelte Johan hart für einen Rabatt von fünf US-Dollar. Nicht gerade viel, aber immerhin. Müde machten wir uns auf den Weg in unser Zimmer. Dazu mussten wir durch enge, sich windende Gässchen radeln, unsere zahlreichen Taschen durch den kompletten Innenhof, der gleichzeitig Restaurant und Lounge war, schleppen und dann nochmals eine enge und steile Treppe hochklettern, um unser Mini-Zimmer zu beziehen. Obwohl alles sehr stilgerecht eingerichtet war, waren wir doch enttäuscht, da wir immerhin 30 US-Dollar für ein extrem kleines Zimmer ohne Bad bezahlen mussten. Daher packten wir am nächsten Morgen unsere Siebensachen wieder, um uns ein anderes Hotel zu suchen. Wieder schleppten wir alles eine Treppe nach unten, durch den Innenhof, bepackten unsere Räder und radelten durch die Gassen zurück zur Rezeption. Die heutige Rezeptionistin bot uns sofort einen weiteren Rabatt von 10 US-Dollar an und so radelten wir wieder zurück und schleppten unsere Taschen ein drittes Mal durch den Innenhof und die steile Treppe hoch.

View from our room
Aussicht aus unserem Zimmer

An diesem Nachmittag teilten uns unsere ‘Jungs’ mit, dass sie bereits am nächsten Tag wieder aufbrechen würden, da ihre Visa leider nicht verlängert wurden und wir luden sie zum Abendessen in unser Hotel ein. Wir tauschten nochmals Fotos und Adressen aus und drehten letzte gemeinsame Videos bevor wir sie endgültig verabschiedeten. Wir hatten eine sehr schöne gemeinsame Zeit und hatten uns sehr an ihre Gesellschaft und ihren großen Appetit gewöhnt – wir hätten nie gedacht, dass es Menschen gibt, die noch mehr essen können als wir –  und waren doch ein bisschen traurig, sie weiterziehen zu lassen. Aber das ist die Kehrseite der Medaille von Reisenden: Wir treffen immer wieder liebe Menschen, lernen sie besser kennen und schätzen und müssen dann wieder Abschied nehmen. Das ist oft sehr schwer, aber der Gedanke, sie irgendwann irgendwo auf der Welt wiederzutreffen, macht das Ganze dann erträglicher. Alles Gute euch beiden!

Schiras hat uns nicht ganz so sehr beeindruckt wie Esfahan, hat sich aber trotzdem gelohnt. Bekannt ist die Stadt für seine Dichter, den Wein und Blumen. Während Wein weder produziert noch konsumiert werden darf – wie übrigens überall im Iran, da Alkohol verboten ist – ist die Stadt voll mit Gärten und Zitrusbäumen, die die Straßenränder säumen. Wir besuchten das Mausoleum und den Schrein des Lichtkönigs, wofür wir sogar einen persönlichen Guide bekamen, der eine Schärpe mit der Aufschrift “International Affairs” (Internationale Angelegenheiten) trug – alleine durften wir das Mausoleum und die Moschee nicht betreten. Ich musste einen Chador tragen und Fotos durften wir auch keine machen. In rasender Geschwindigkeit erklärte uns der Guide  alles Mögliche über den Lichtkönig und seinen Bruder, ich hatte fast Angst, er würde ersticken. Alles ging so schnell, dass wir Gesagtes innerhalb von Minuten wieder vergaßen. Die Moschee betraten wir dann getrennt und ich trat in eine glitzernde Halle ein mit Frauen, die das silberne Gestänge des Schreins und danach ihr Gesicht berührten. Diese Prozedur wurde entlang des kompletten Schreins mehrfach wiederholt. Die Halle selbst sah wunderschön aus, mit kleinen Spiegelmosaiken, die das Licht der Kronleuchter widerspiegelten und dafür sorgen sollten, dass sich die Menschen nicht auf ihr Aussehen, sondern auf Gott konzentrieren, da man sich selbst nicht mehr im Spiegel erkennen konnte. Der ganze Komplex war wunderschön und eine tolle Kombination von alt und neu.

P1230669

The only way for me to enter the mosque
Nur mit Chador durfte ich Mausoleum und Moschee betreten

P1230739

P1230722

P1230733

P1230692

P1230702

P1230713

Wir haben auch das Mausoleum von Hafez besichtigt, einer der berühmtesten Dichter Irans. Man sagt, dass jeder Iraner mindestens drei Bücher besitzt: den Koran, und die gesammelten Gedichte von Hafez und Saadi. Uns wurde auch erzählt, dass die Iraner am Grab sitzen, und Hafez-Gedichte zitieren. Zu unserer größten Enttäuschung sahen wir leider nur stark herausgeputzte Iraner, die mit ihren Selfie-Sticks Selfies machten.

DSCF4003

DSCF4024

DSCF4046

DSCF4028

Eine weitere wunderschöne und friedvolle Sehenswürdigkeit ist die Pink Moschee, bekannt für ihre riesigen farbigen Fenster. Sie wird Pink genannt, da im Inneren viele pinkfarbenen Fliesen verwendet wurden.

P1230779

P1230783

P1230772

P1230814

P1230832

Und hier noch weitere Eindrücke von Schiris: 

The Shiraz fort
Die Festung, mitten in der Stadt

DSCF3982

P1230648

Und dann war es wieder an der Zeit, weiterzuziehen. Wir hatten uns dieses Mal für eine etwas abgelegenere Route durch die Berge entschieden, um den starken Verkehr zu vermeiden. Am Ende des ersten Tages hielten wir in einem kleinen Dorf, um nach einem Schlafplatz zu suchen. Schnell wurde uns geholfen, und wir wurden zu einer Moschee gebracht – einer riesigen Halle, die in der Mitte durch einen Vorhang getrennt war. Wir richteten uns ein, in einer Ecke das Schlafzimmer und in der Mitte des Raumes, direkt unter der einzigen Lampe, das Esszimmer. Danach begannen wir zu kochen, als plötzlich zwei Männer kamen, uns etwas irritiert anschauten, in der Moschee verschwanden, um ein Tonband mit dem Gebetsaufruf anzuschalten, um dann sofort wieder herauszukommen. Zumindest wussten wir jetzt, dass nicht jeder Gebetsaufruf live stattfindet! Allerdings mussten wir alle unsere Sachen wieder wegräumen, da wir unser Lager in der Frauenmoschee aufgeschlagen hatten. Super! Während ich weiterkochte, räumte Johan alles so gut es ging in eine Ecke. Kurz darauf kamen dann auch fünf Frauen, um in unserem Schlafzimmer für ungefähr zehn Minuten zu beten und gingen dann wieder. Während wir aßen, fanden sich auf der Männerseite noch ein Paar weitere Männer ein. Nachdem alle mit dem Beten fertig waren, wurden wir von bestimmt zehn Familienoberhäupten eingeladen, doch besser bei ihnen zu nächtigen. Wir lehnten ab, hatten wir so gar keine Lust, wieder alles einzupacken und umzuziehen. Dafür wurden uns dann aber zwei Jungs an die Seite gestellt, die im Männerabteil schlafen sollten, damit uns auch ja nichts passierte. Am nächsten Morgen hatte Johan dann eine etwas unschöne politische Diskussion mit einem der Jungs. Es ging um das Thema Zensur, und dass der Iran Fernsehsender wie BBC und CNN nicht zulässt. Er war tatsächlich überzeugt, dass dies das einzig Richtige sei, da die US-Regierung ja extrem schlecht sei und den Islamischen Staat unterstütze. Zum Glück haben wir nicht sehr viele so gehirngewaschenen Menschen im Iran getroffen.

At 'our' mosque
Früh morgens in ‘unserer’ Moschee
Ready to leave
Fertig für einen neuen Tag

Die Route, die wir uns ausgesucht hatten, war einsamer und schöner, als wir dachten. Ganze zwei Tage hatten wir kein Mobilnetz und Verkehr gab es auch kaum. Wir radelten durch eine steinige und sehr bergige Wüste und die Landschaft änderte sich ständig von baumgesäumten Straßen bis hin zu kargen Bergen, wo kein Leben möglich scheint. Manchmal sah die Landschaft mit ihren vielen kleinen Erhebungen aus wie eine große Baustelle mit aufgehäuften Schotterbergen. In der letzten größeren Stadt durften wir in einem Hotelgarten zelten, dies aber erst nach einer langen und sehr unfreundlichen Diskussion mit den Hotelmanagern. Die folgenden Nächte verbrachten wir zum ersten Mal bei iranischen Familien, da wir keine guten Zeltplätze finden konnten. Die zweite Familie warnte uns vor der Küste, dort gäbe es viele Ali Babas und zwei Radfahren seien wohl erst vor Kurzem dort überfallen worden. Mit gemischten Gefühlen und verunsichert fuhren wir am nächsten Tag weiter, da wir nicht wussten, wie wir den letzten Teil unserer Reise durch den Iran gestalten sollten.

DSCF4094

P1230873

We're not really fond of tunnels
Auch eine Möglichkeit, um eine Straße fahruntauglich zu machen
P1230896
Johans neues Fortbewegungsmittel
P1230909
Bienenstöcke in den Bergen

P1230887

P1230910
Natürlich gegen den Wind – was sonst?

DSCF4060

We're not so fond of tunnels
Tunnel finden wir nicht wirklich toll, sind in den Bergen aber oft unumgänglich

P1230913

DSCF4122

DSCF4156

Our campsite at the hotel garden
Zelten im Hotelgarten unter Orangenbäumen

DSCF4200

DSCF4215

Local nomads

P1230916
Lokale Nomaden

DSCF4236

The first family we stayed with
Bei unserer ersten Familie…
...and whith who we had a wonderful evening.
…mit der wir einen wunderschönen Abend verbrachten. 

DSCF4359

DSCF4353

DSCF4381

DSCF4386

A road just for the two of us - unfortunately only for about 10km
Eine Straße nur für uns beide – leider aber nur für ungefähr 10 Kilometer. 
Super yummy food: Rice, chicken with French fries, raw vegetable salad and prawns
Super leckeres Essen: Reis, Hähnchen mit Pommes, Gemüsesalat und Garnelen 
With our hosts - the men from the gas station
Mit unseren Gastgebern – die Männer von der Tankstelle 
And the second family - the ones who were worried about Ali Baba at the coast
Bei der zweiten Familie – die sich vor Ali Baba an der Küste fürchteten! 

We are Family

515km, 2.480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)
515km, 2,480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)

6 – 16 November, 2015 – Esfahan is the number-one tourist destination in Iran for good reason. We were blown away by its historic bazaars, tree-lined boulevards, the magnificent Imam Square, the second-largest square on earth, the Armenian quarter, its beautiful historic bridges and the Jameh Mosque, a veritable museum of Islamic architecture. We spent five full days relaxing, sightseeing, buying ourselves some nice souvenirs, extending our Iran visas and re-filling our batteries with good and often not so very healthy food – actually we had a burger or similar fast food almost every day. Fast food places are booming everywhere in Iran and hamburgers, hot dogs – often misspelled as hat dogs – or falafel sandwiches have become staple snacks besides kebab.

The great Imam Square: 

DSCF2246

At a mosque
In front of a mosque at the square

Imam square

DSCF2366

School kids
School kids

DSCF2571

DSCF3109

DSCF3171

DSCF3172DSCF3201At the bazaar: DSCF2755

DSCF2757

DSCF2600

DSCF2772

DSCF2769

Curry!
Curry!

At our hostel we met the first touring cyclist, Jakob from Stuttgart, and we exchanged roadside stories. There we also met an Iranian who was looking for French-speaking tourists. As I was the only one around he started chatting with me to practice his French. After all the usual questions such as “Where are you from?, What is your name?, Do you like Iran?” he invited us for lunch to his home. We were a little bit surprised by this spontaneous invitation and decided to decline it as we weren’t really sure about the man’s real intention. Was he a tour guide and expecting money from us? Was he trying to get anything else from us? Or was he just another friendly Iranian keen on demonstrating Iranian hospitality? We would never find out.

The Jameh (or Friday) Mosque: DSCF2653DSCF2836DSCF2698DSCF2895

In Esfahan we also noticed the exaggerated beauty-mania Iran is famous for. Never had we seen so many women – and men by the way – with plasters on their noses or face masks given their recent plastic surgery. Women are wearing an awful lot of make-up, shave off their eyebrows to repaint them in for us bizarre and unnatural shapes. Not only look all noses the same in a very unnatural way but also their lips and cheeks have been injected. We were easily able to distinguish a natural from an artificial Iranian face within seconds. For us a very disturbing and sad trend, as Iranian women and men are very handsome, even more so without plastic surgery.

The men’s mosque at the Imam Square:

DSCF2824DSCF2872DSCF2881DSCF2928At the river: 

DSCF3010

DSCF3034

DSCF3044

With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival - before there was no water in the river
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival – before there was no water in the river

In the meantime we also noticed that it was getting winter. At an altitude of around 1500 meters day temperatures were still around 20 degrees but declined heavily at night. Night frost became more common day by day but we were grateful for the still low precipitation.

Some random Esfahan shots: 

DSCF2734

DSCF3086

DSCF3189

At a fancy restaurant - a former hamam, food was just average though!
At a fancy restaurant – a former hammam, food was just average though!

We couldn’t leave Esfahan without going once more back to the Imam Square, this time with our bikes. Again, we got several invitations to come with people to their homes and again we declined. As soon as we are sitting on our fully loaded bikes, we are no longer the ‘normal’ tourists and attract a lot of attention, even in tourist-spoilt cities like Esfahan.

DSCF3276

Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.
Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.

P1230524

On our way out of Esfahan we met another touring cyclist on his way to Shiraz – Samuel (19) from Germany. Samuel has been cycling from Germany to Iran and is writing about his adventures on samuelontour.com. Together we cycled to Shiraz. We finally were a family! In Iran it is forbidden to share a hotel room, if a couple is not married. Hence, we kept telling people, that we are married, which always triggered the question of children we declined and which usually resulted in an awkward silence. But now we had another problem – just one son wasn’t enough either!

Leaving Esfahan
Leaving Esfahan
With Samuel
With Samuel
Always trying to find a good road to cycle - this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder
Always trying to find a good road to cycle – this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder

On our first evening together we slept at a mosque. While Johan, the organizer, checked the room I waited together with Samuel when a man approached us and started the usual talking. As soon as he found out that Samuel was neither my husband (!!!) nor my son he turned to Samuel whispering in his ears. Samuel’s reaction told me clearly that he got an immoral offer from a gay Iranian. And this, while the government declares proudly, that there are no gay people in the country ;-). It took a few minutes to make the guy understood that Samuel seriously doesn’t want to have sex with him before he drove off in his car. Samuel told us, that this has happened quite often to him and all the times in Iran. We spent the night in a warm and spacious room with two huge beds, a bathroom and even our own kitchen. In the morning we got breakfast served and our 10 Dollars for the room returned – again, people were treating us very well!

The mosque we stayed at
The mosque we stayed at

DSCF3349The longer we cycled the more interesting became the landscape. We were moving at an altitude of around 2000 meters. The barren desert-like landscape was lined by rugged mountains in the far distance, some of them snow-capped by now. Traffic lessened the further away we got from Esfahan and we could either cycle on good dirt roads right next to the main highway or on a wide shoulder. We crossed a few passes, often struggled with headwinds but sometimes also flew with the wind.

DSCF3354

DSCF3360

Fixing a problem with Samuel's chain
Fixing a problem with Samuel’s chain

The second night with Samuel we spent at the Red Crescent. This time, they were housed in a real building, not just containers and we got our own room, could use their showers and kitchen and once more enjoyed the warmth inside. This journey along the edge of the desert was becoming a very comfortable one as we had anticipated another 5-day-journey without showers or any other luxuries.

We are family!
We are family!
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn't filling enough
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn’t filling enough
Johan having fun on the road
Johan having fun on the road

Our third day after leaving Esfahan was our longest in terms of kilometers and time in the saddle. Almost all day we had to climb and the headwind didn’t make it any easier. I spent most of the day in Johan’s or Samuel’s slipstream to reduce waiting time for them and to make it easier for me. It’s not my preferred way of cycling, as I don’t like looking at the back of somebody all day long, even if it is Johan’s back. By 4pm we reached the top of a pass at around 2,500m and still had around 25km to cycle into town, which we reached within an hour as we now cycled mostly downhill. Shattered and cold we asked a few people for a place to stay and they drove us to a house, where we could stay in a filthy room for a bit more than 10 EUR. Despite Samuel being unhappy about our decision, as paying for accommodation wasn’t neither adventurous nor interesting, we took the room. In the end we all were glad to be able to stay at a warm place instead of pitching the tent in a dark park at freezing temperatures.

DSCF3461 DSCF3508 DSCF3465

P1230557After a slow start the following morning and with only Samuel being showered we continued our journey with today’s planned destination of Pasergardae, the place of Cyrus the Great’s tomb. At the beginning of another pass we met Jakob (19), another German touring cyclist, who joined our little family. Finally we were a ‘real’ family according to Iranian standards. Pasargadae is lesser known and besides Cyrus’ tomb not a really exciting site. The four of us still spent a few hours there and convinced Jakob to camp with us at the nearby restaurant. The following morning we woke to a completely frozen tent – very mystique, but very cold. Thankfully we could dry our tents and sleeping bags in the once again overheated restaurant. Something we noticed everywhere: now that it was getting colder, people started using their gas heating to an extent that was becoming extremely uncomfortable for us with inside temperatures of 25 degrees and above.

Samuel and Jakob
Samuel and Jakob
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Cyrus' tomb
Cyrus’ tomb

P1230565

DSCF3554

Our little campsite behind the restaurant
Our little campsite behind the restaurant
Freezing cold!
Freezing cold!

DSCF3570

After half a day’s downhill cycling on a road meandering through a huge canyon we reached Persepolis, a Unesco World Heritage Site and one of the cultural highlights of our Iran trip. Persepolis was the capital of the Achaemenid Empire founded by Darius I in 518 B.C.. He created an impressive palace complex with monumental staircases, exquisite reliefs, striking gateways and massive columns that left us in no doubt how great this empire must have been. The whole complex had been covered in dust and sand and was only rediscovered in 1931.

Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones
Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones

DSCF3590

Onion harvest
Onion harvest

P1230586

DSCF3628

Persepolis: 

For the family album :-)
For the family album 🙂

P1230603

Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front
Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front

DSCF3681

DSCF3777

DSCF3707

P1230610

DSCF3699

We once more camped all together at an official campsite under pine-trees close to the Persepolis ruins and did not leave the following morning before having a final look from the outside at the palaces. Shortly after our departure we lost our ‘kids’, who obviously were keen to reach Shiraz as quickly as possible. So we continued once more alone, crossing two more small passes before rolling down into Shiraz. Traffic was massif and cycling no fun and we were glad when we finally reached our hotel.

Watch Samuel’s videos of our time together here: video 1 and video 2.

Coffee break as there was no more need to hurry having lost the boys anyway

Getting closer to Shiraz
Getting closer to Shiraz

P1230632

Familienglück

515km, 2.480 m altitude gain (4,268km and 32,352m altitude gain in total)
515km, 2.480 Höhenmeter (insgesamt 4.268km und 32.352 Höhenmeter)

6. – 16. November 2015 – Esfahan ist die wichtigste Touristenattraktion im Iran aus gutem Grund. Wir waren fasziniert von den historischen Basaren, von den vielen Baumalleen mitten in der Stadt, vom einzigartigen Imam-Platz (übrigens Zweitgrößter weltweit!), vom armenischen Viertel, von den schönen historischen Brücken und der Freitagsmoschee, die eher einem Museum für islamische Architektur gleicht. Wir haben ganze fünf Tage hier verbracht um uns auszuruhen, die Stadt anzuschauen, Souvenirs zu kaufen, unsere Iran-Visa zu verlängern und um unsere Batterien mit gutem, aber oft auch wenig gesundem Essen aufzuladen. Um ehrlich zu sein, haben wir fast jeden Tag Hamburger oder Ähnliches gegessen! Snackbars boomen überall im Iran und Hamburger, Hot Dogs, Falafel Sandwiches & Co. sind hier mittlerweile fast so alltäglich wie Kebab.

Der großartige Imam-Platz: 

DSCF2246

At a mosque
Vor einer Moschee auf dem Platz

Imam square

DSCF2366

School kids
Schülerinnen-Ausflug

DSCF2571

DSCF3109

DSCF3171

DSCF3172DSCF3201

Auf dem Basar: DSCF2755

DSCF2757

DSCF2600

DSCF2772

DSCF2769

Curry!
Curry!

In unserem Hostel haben wir unseren ersten Radreisenden im Iran, Jakob aus Stuttgart getroffen und uns mit ihm rege ausgetauscht. Wir trafen dort auch auf einen Iraner, der nach französisch sprechenden Touristen Ausschau hielt. Da ich die einzige war, übte er mir mir. Nach den typischen Frage wie “Woher kommt ihr? Wie heißt ihr? Gefällt es euch im Iran?” lud er uns spontan zu sich nach Hause zum Essen ein. Etwas überrumpelt lehnten wir jedoch ab, da wir die wirkliche Absicht des Iraners nicht kannten. War er ein Reiseführer, der auf Kundenschau war? Wollte er sonst irgendetwas von uns? Oder war er doch nur ein weiterer freundlicher Iraner, der uns zeigen wollte, wie gastfreundlich hier doch die Menschen sind? Wir sollten es wohl nie erfahren.

Die Freitagsmoschee: DSCF2653DSCF2836DSCF2698DSCF2895

In Esfahan fiel uns auch zum ersten Mal der übertriebene Schönheitswahn auf, für den die Iraner so bekannt sind. Nirgendwo haben wir so viele Frauen – und übrigens auch Männer – mit Pflastern auf den Nasen und Mundschutz aufgrund einer kürzlich durchgeführten Operation gesehen. Frauen tragen sehr viel Make-Up, rasieren sich ihre Augenbrauen komplett weg, um sie in etwas merkwürdigen, oft eckigen Formen und viel zu kurz nachzuzeichnen. Mittlerweile sehen viele Nasen genau gleich aus und leider werden auch oft die Wangen und Lippen aufgespritzt. Innerhalb von Sekunden konnten wir ein natürliches von einem ‘bearbeiteten’ Gesicht unterscheiden. Für uns ein sehr irritierender und trauriger Trend, wo doch die Iraner eigentlich sehr schöne Menschen sind.

Männermoschee auf dem Imam-Platz:

DSCF2824DSCF2872DSCF2881DSCF2928Am Fluss: 

DSCF3010

DSCF3034

DSCF3044

With a Polish guy we met at our guesthouse
Diesen Polen haben wir bereits in unserem Hostel getroffen
The dam had been opened just the day of our arrival - before there was no water in the river
Am Tag unserer Ankunft wurden die Schleusen des Damms geöffnet, davor floss hier im Fluss kein Wasser

In der Zwischenzeit wurde es allmählich Winter. Auf einer Höhe von ungefähr 1.500 Metern kletterte das Thermometer tagsüber noch immer auf um die 20 Grad, fiel aber nachts stark ab. Wir mussten immer wieder mit Nachtfrost rechnen, waren aber für den noch immer geringen Niederschlag sehr dankbar.

Noch mehr aus Esfahan: 

DSCF2734

DSCF3086

DSCF3189

At a fancy restaurant - a former hamam, food was just average though!
In einem coolen Restaurant, das früher einmal ein Hamam war. Leider war das Essen nur mäßig gut.

Am Tag unserer Abreise mussten wir nochmals über den Imam-Platz fahren. Wieder wurden wir mehrfach von Iranern nach Hause eingeladen und wieder lehnten wir ab. Sobald wir auf unseren voll beladenen Rädern sitzen, zählen wir nicht mehr zu den gewöhnlichen Touristen sondern sind eher eine Attraktion, selbst in Touristenhochburgen wie Esfahan.

DSCF3276

Best friends? Not really, we just met and got invited for tea.
Beste Freunde? Nicht wirklich. Nach einem kurzen Pläuschchen wurden wir von ihr zum Tee eingeladen.

P1230524

Auf dem Weg aus der Stadt kam uns ein weiterer Radreisender hinterher geradelt – Samuel (19) aus Deutschland war ebenfalls auf dem Weg nach Shiraz und schloss sich uns an. Er ist aus Deutschland bis hierher geradelt und schreibt über seine Abenteuer auf samuelontour.com. Jetzt waren wir endlich eine Familie. Im Iran dürfen Unverheiratete kein Hotelzimmer teilen. Aus diesem Grund erzählten wir auch immer, dass wir verheiratet seien, was natürlich immer gleich die Kinderfrage zur Folge hatte. Eine Verneinung führte dann immer zu betretenem Schweigen. Mit Samuel hatten wir allerdings ein weiteres Problem – nur ein Sohn war natürlich nicht genug!

Leaving Esfahan
Kurz nach Esfahan
With Samuel
Mit Samuel
Always trying to find a good road to cycle - this time a gravel road next to the busy highway without shoulder
Immer auf der Suche nach guten Alternativen – dieses Mal ein Schotterweg neben der verkehrsreichen Hauptstraße ohne Seitenstreifen

An unserem ersten gemeinsamen Abend schliefen wir in einer Moschee. Während unser Organisator Johan das Zimmer inspizierte, wartete ich gemeinsam mit Samuel vor der Moschee. Irgendwann kam ein Mann auf uns zu und stellte die üblichen Fragen. Als er herausfand, dass Samuel weder mein Ehemann (!!!) noch mein Sohn war, wandte er sich Samuel zu, um ihm etwas ins Ohr zu flüstern. An seiner Reaktion war mir klar, dass er wieder einmal ein unmoralisches Angebot von einem schwulen Iraner bekommen hatte. Und das, obwohl die Regierung so stolz erklärt, dass es im Land keine Homosexuellen gäbe – haha! Es dauerte eine Weile, bis der Typ verstand, dass Samuel nicht mit ihm die Kiste springen will. Später erzählte uns Samuel, dass ihm das im Iran bereits öfters passiert sei. Diese Nacht verbrachten wir in einem luxuriösen Zimmer mit Küche, Bad und zwei riesigen Betten. Am Morgen wurde uns das Frühstück serviert und die zehn Dollar, die wir eigentlich hätten bezahlen müssen, bekamen wir auch wieder zurück. Wieder einmal ist es uns sehr gut ergangen!

 

The mosque we stayed at
In dieser Moschee haben wir übernachtet

Je weiter wir uns von Esfahan entfernten, desto schöner und interessanter wurde die Landschaft. Wir befanden uns jetzt auf einem Hochplateau auf ungefähr 2.000 Metern. Die karge, wüstenartige Landschaft wurde in der Ferne von schroffen, teils schneebedeckten Bergen eingerahmt. Der Verkehr wurde auch immer weniger und wir radelten entweder auf Schottenwegen neben der Hauptstraße oder auf einem breiten Seitenstreifen. Wir überquerten einige Pässe, kämpften häufig gegen den Wind, hatten aber manches Mal auch Glück und durften mit dem Wind fahren. 
DSCF3354DSCF3360

Fixing a problem with Samuel's chain
Behebung eines Kettenproblems

Die zweite gemeinsame Nacht mit Samuel verbrachten wir beim Roten Halbmond. Dieses Mal waren wir in einem richtigen Haus untergebracht, bekamen unser eigenes Zimmer und es gab sogar Duschen und eine Küche. Wieder waren wir froh, dass wir im Warmen übernachten konnten. Diese Reise am Rande der Wüste wurde sehr komfortabel, sind wir doch davon ausgegangen, dass wir die fünf Tage ohne Duschen und sonstigen Luxus verbringen würden.

We are family!
Eine richtige Familie!
Second breakfast only shortly after our first, our porridge wasn't filling enough
Zweites Frühstück, nachdem unser Porridge scheinbar nicht genug war
Johan having fun on the road
Ich will Spaß, ich will Spaß…

Am dritten Tag nach Esfahan verbrachten wir die längste Zeit im Sattel und radelten auch die meisten Kilometer. Fast den ganzen Tag ging es bergauf und der Gegenwind machte die Sache nicht einfacher. Ich fuhr fast den ganzen Tag entweder in Johans oder Samuels Windschatten, um mir die Arbeit zu erleichtern und die Wartezeiten für die beiden zu verkürzen. Mir macht das allerdings keinen wirklichen Spaß, den ganzen Tag auf den Rücken des Vorausfahrenden zu schauen, auch wenn es Johans Rücken ist! Gegen 16 Uhr erreichten wir dann den Gipfel auf ungefähr 2,500m, mussten bis zur nächsten Stadt aber noch 25km radeln. Da es fast ausschließlich bergab ging, schafften wir das in einer Stunde. Kaputt und ausgekühlt fragten wir nach Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten und wir wurden zu einem Haus gefahren, in dem dreckige Zimmer vermietet wurden. Für etwas mehr als 10 EUR blieben wir, obwohl Samuel mit unserer Entscheidung nicht glücklich war, da ein zu bezahlendes Zimmer weder abenteuerlich noch interessant ist. Am Ende waren wir dann aber doch alle froh, in einem warmen Zimmer zu übernachten, anstelle unser Zelt im Dunkeln im Park bei eisigen Temperaturen aufzuschlagen.

DSCF3461 DSCF3508 DSCF3465

P1230557

Den nächsten Morgen ließen wir gemächlich angehen und trotz Badezimmer duschte nur Samuel. Heute wollten wir Pasergardae erreichen, die Grabstelle von Kyros dem Großen. An einem weiteren Pass trafen wir Jakob (19), noch einen deutschen Radfahrer, der sich unserer kleinen Familie anschloss. Jetzt waren wir nach iranischen Maßstäben endlich eine richtige Familie! Pasargadae ist als Touristenattraktion nicht sehr bekannt und bis auf das Grab auch ein wenig langweilig. Trotzdem verbrachten wir einige Stunden und überzeugten Jakob später, mit uns hinter einem Restaurant zu zelten. Am nächsten Morgen waren Landschaft und unsere Zelte wie mit Zuckerguss überzogen – alles war weiß und sehr mystisch, aber leider auch sehr kalt. Zum Glück konnten wir unsere Zelte und Schlafsäcke im völlig überheizten Restaurant trocknen. Das fiel uns übrigens überall auf: plötzlich wurde wie verrückt geheizt – mit für uns extrem unangenehmen Temperaturen von oft über 25 Grad.

Samuel and Jakob
Samuel und Jakob
Lunch with Samuel and Jakob at Pasergardae
Mittagessen mit Samuel und Jakob in Pasergardae
Cyrus' tomb
Das Grab Kyros des Großen

P1230565

DSCF3554

P1230565

Freezing cold!
Arschkalt!

DSCF3570

Nachdem wir einen halben Tag nur bergab rollten, auf einer Straße, die sich durch einen riesigen Canyon schlängelte, erreichten wir Persepolis, Unesco Weltkulturerbe und einer unserer kulturellen Höhepunkte im Iran. Persepolis war die Hauptstadt des achaemenidischen Imperiums, gegründet von Darius I 515 v.Chr. Er hat einen beeindruckenden Palastkomplex mit monumentalen Treppenaufgängen, exquisiten Reliefs, markanten Toren und massiven Säulen geschaffen, das keine Zweifel offen lies, wie groß diese Imperium einmal gewesen sein muss. Erst 1931 wurde der gesamte Komplex wiederentdeckt, bis dahin war alles mit Staub und Sand bedeckt.

Second breakfast for our hungry boys, coffee for the older ones
Zweites Frühstück für unsere hungrigen Jungs, Kaffee für die Alten

DSCF3590

Onion harvest
Zwiebelernte

P1230586

DSCF3628

Persepolis: 

For the family album :-)
Für’s Familienalbum 🙂

P1230603

Trying to take a picture without disturbing glass in front
Der Versuch zu fotografieren, ohne störendes Glas im Vordergrund

DSCF3681

DSCF3777

DSCF3707

P1230610

DSCF3699

Noch einmal zelteten wir alle zusammen auf einem offiziellen Zeltplatz unter Pinienbäumen in der Nähe der Persepolis-Ruinen und fuhren am nächsten Morgen erst weiter, nachdem wir nochmals einen letzten Blick auf Persepolis geworfen hatten. Kurz nach unserem Aufbruch verloren wir allerdings unsere ‘Kinder’, die Shiraz offensichtlich so schnell wie möglich erreichen wollten. Also fuhren wir wieder alleine, über zwei kleine Berge, bevor wir endlich in Shiraz einrollten. Auf diesem Streckenteil war der Verkehr grausam und das Fahrradfahren hat nicht wirklich Spaß gemacht und so waren wir froh, als wir endlich unser Hotel erreichten.

Samuel hat zwei Videos unserer gemeinsamen Zeit veröffentlicht, die ihr hier anschauen könnt: Video 1 und Video 2.

Getting closer to Shiraz
Auf dem Weg nach Shiraz

P1230632

Through the Iranian Desert

619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)
619km, altitude gain of 2,659km (3,753km and 29.872 m altitude gain in total)

25 October – 5 November, 2015 – We were ready to leave before 8am after a bad night’s sleep with noisy neighbors when two men from the local newspaper approached us for an interview without even asking if it was OK for us. Thirty minutes and many questions and photos later we left the mosque with a bag full of raisins and walnuts – a gift from the journalists. They filmed us while we were leaving the city and wished us good luck for our next part of the trip through the desert.

We were now looking forward to quiet roads and starry nights. The first night we camped behind some abandoned stables off the highway and while cooking dinner we were approached by a man in a car.  For minutes he talked in Farsi to us. When he finally noticed that we didn’t understand a word, he left again. We wondered for a while how he found us as we had followed a small track and thought nobody could see us here.

This is our daily bread - not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
This is our daily bread, best eaten fresh from the bakery as it feels like chewing on cardboard after a few hours – not that you are mistaking this for new scarves
Photo session at the mosque
Photo session at the mosque
One of the reporters
Reporter 1 and photographer…
...and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions.
…and reporter 2, the English teacher, asking all the questions and with our bag full of raisins and walnuts..

DSCF0663

Finally an empty road
Finally an empty road
There is still some life in the desert
There is still some life in the desert
Who's the camel?
Who’s the camel?
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Wonderful camping in the middle of nowhere
Preparing breakfast...
Preparing breakfast…
Breakfast at a what we thought well-hidden place
…eating breakfast!
A typical desert village
A typical desert village

During the day temperatures still climbed well beyond 30 degrees and the cloudless sky and treeless desert left us with nowhere to shelter from the heat. Every once in a while people would stop to give us food or just ask if we were OK or needed anything. In the early afternoon we reached a small desert town and were stopped by a police car. By the time I caught up with Johan, he was surrounded by four men – three policemen and an English teacher. I got a little worried only to learn later, that the police had seen us earlier and as they didn’t speak English they had picked up the English teacher to welcome us. They wanted to make sure we would find a good place to sleep and food for the evening. I was overwhelmed when the English teacher asked us to tell our friends and families at home that Iranians are good people. That was not the first time we were asked that. Iranians feel pretty misunderstood by the Western world and they are extremely keen on being seen as hospitable and kind. Often we would be asked if we also thought that all Iranians are terrorists, as this is – according to their understanding – what BBC and CNN would broadcast.

DSCF0685

Another village
Another village

DSCF0751

Relaxing at the guesthouse
Lunch break
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling
Outfit, headwind and heat make for hard desert cycling

After three days of difficult cycling through undulating barren landscapes and daily headwinds we reached the desert town Tabas from where we took the train to Yazd. Iran is four times the size of Germany or three times the size of France which made it impossible for us to cycle every single stretch. Trains in Iran are pretty cool, but leave at pretty uncool times, which again makes them very cool, as they are empty and a lot of train staff takes care of a few passengers. Our train left at 2am in the morning and we got our own comfortable sleeping compartment and our bikes got their own next to us. In fact, we were the only passengers in our carriage. In the morning we had breakfast in the train restaurant and we felt a bit like sitting in the famous Orient-Express.

Change of scenery
Change of scenery
Sand dunes
Sand dunes
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius
Power nap at almost 40 degrees Celsius

DSCF0990

DSCF1025

At the mosque in Tabas
At the mosque in Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
The gardens of Tabas
In the mosque
In the mosque
And the mosque at night
And the mosque at night
Leaving Tabas by train
Leaving Tabas by train
Sleeping in the train...
Sleeping in the train…
...and breakfast with the train staff
…and breakfast with the train staff.

In Yazd we checked into a far too expensive hotel for a shabby room and filthy shared bathrooms only to change the next day to a traditional hotel at the same price with our own clean bathroom. Yazd is one of the highlights in Iran with its forests of windtowers, the so-called badgirs and winding lanes through the mud-brick old town. We cycled through a labyrinth of small alleys, got lost in the huge covered bazaar and chilled with good coffee and food in one of the many rooftop restaurants while enjoying a fabulous vista of old Yazd.

Impressions of Yazd: